I’m annoyed …

This morning, well, actually it started last night, I have been growing increasing annoyed.

If I hear one more “expert”, former agent of some security/LE related government agency, “news” reader, politician, etc. say one more time “if you see it, report it” (last night’s message) I may start throwing things.   By the way, the innocuous sounding “say something” admonishment has this morning been twisted to say:   someone should have said something and this COULD have been prevented.   No it couldn’t.  No one knows that.

What is the point of the above comments anyway?  Are they saying —  it’s the victims’ own fault?   This is ludicrous.

The MSM is effectively telling the teenage victims they are to blame for the tragedy that occurred at their school if they did not say something.   This is not true, in fact, they, the non-shooters, did nothing wrong.   Do the experts and “news” idiots not realize the surviving students are likely “hearing” a message  that is saying  “You are responsible for the death of your friends”.   This is lie, and nothing less than insensitive bullying.   Can the “experts” be that stupid?  By the way, I haven’t heard evidence that anyone “knew” a tragedy would occur for a “fact” before the event occurred.

And while I am at it, why are they interrogating/interviewing “children” who who have just experienced a terrible traumatic event and are obviously  in shock?     Have the news personalities no sensitivity to the emotional state of the children and long term potential harm to the teens?   That said,  I did notice some of the females appeared to have gotten “dressed” for their appearance, and were being interviewed in their “bedrooms”?   Did they think it was an audition?  By the way, I saw no moms and or dads present during the interviews.   It all seemed a little “produced” to me.

This morning, I am hearing that one adult did report internet postings made by a person named Cruz to the FBI.   The FBI did what they could, or at least followed up as well as could be done.   However, this drum-beat Call for people to watch and report on their neighbors, is spooky to me.  Has anyone reading this ever spoken with a person from Cuba about the  Neighborhood Youth Groups in Cuba and how they are indoctrinated into watching and informing on friends and family to the government?  This entire “say something” message is a slippery slope.

In my opinion, the time to stop tragedies such as this, as much as it is possible to so at all, is long before any gun triggers  have been pulled.   It begins with a culture that values human life.  Human life belongs at the top of a society’s pyramid of values.   Not at the bottom somewhere around the “convenient” level.

All that said,  there is plenty of time in the weeks to come for Monday-morning quarterbacking this event.   Time enough to take advantage of free nationwide advertising of one’s “security” related “expertise”; to sell security services and sign new customers.  Time enough to create another new and unneeded school security government agency at the local, state, and federal levels.   Time enough to exploit this event and advance political causes.

But the time is not today.   Today is the day to mourn and gather family and friends near.   Or have we lost all our humanity?  It seems every time I turn on the television, I am reminded why I turned it off.

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33 thoughts on “I’m annoyed …”

  1. Good post and may I add that if anyone “says something” about anything unusual, they’re prone to being labeled a racist, sexist, homophobe, or alarmist. We send very mixed messages to young people in this country and then wonder why things like this are not prevented.

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  2. Good attitude, TT.

    Florida’s legislature has denied trained teachers the ability to carry weapons in schools.  It was primarily due to union and PTA forces against it.  How many times do we need to witness the fact that the only thing that stops nefarious use of a gun is a good guy with a gun.  Gun-free zones are always where these shootings occur.  They are free range zones, not safe zones. 

    The Israelis have federally mandated an armed guard at every school and they control entry; they’ve not had an incident since they instituted that program. 

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  3. Trinity Waters:
     

    The Israelis have federally mandated an armed guard at every school and they control entry; they’ve not had an incident since they instituted that program. 

    I much prefer this method to arming teachers only because of personal family feedback. Both my mother and her sister were educators and good ones, but they would have been discouraged if they’d been required to carry firearms. My mother has long since retired but feels strongly that teachers are distracted by too many things other than teaching as it is!

    I approve of specialization. Teachers should focus upon encouraging kids to learn and to reiterate Sean Hannity’s commentary last night, let’s put school security in the hands of retired police officers and military personnel.

    Let the experts excel in their individual arenas.

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  4. Robert A. McReynolds:
    In fact someone did say something to the FBI and they did nothing. I suppose they had bigger issues to deal with at the FBI.

    Anecdotal story but a true one. I was on a LAX-JFK flight three years after 9/11 and as always, extremely aware of the passengers around me. Without going into the politically incorrect details, I was disturbed by an individual at the gate before we boarded and expressed my concerns to airline personnel. I was ignored and all but accused of racial profiling.

    I had a fretful flight indeed as this particular man was sitting in front of me in first class and quite accessible to the cockpit. Upon landing at JFK, a SWAT team boarded the plane and announced that nobody was allowed to disembark as they hauled this passenger right out of his seat. While watching the news the following day, I learned this individual was a suspected Al-Qaeda member and on a watch list.

    Why was I the only one to express concern before the flight took off?

    Adding a P.S. because I’m on a roll about national security now!
    Date: 2014
    Place: Paris Orly Airport

    My husband and I were boarding a flight in Paris and security was stopping and frisking random passengers as we stepped onto the plane after we’d gone through the tedious rigmarole already. As a 5’4″ 115 lb. blonde American I was stopped for a full body search because I obviously fit the profile of a terrorist. The woman searching me (a native of India) gasped when I complained: “Really? You’re going to frisk me as those two Arabic men in front of me get to waltz on the flight with nary a glance?”

    She decided to call the French authorities to interrogate me and I nearly missed the flight. It was un mauvais jour pour moi parce que mon mari wanted to shoot me pour ma grande bouche.

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  5. EThompson:

    Trinity Waters:

    The Israelis have federally mandated an armed guard at every school and they control entry; they’ve not had an incident since they instituted that program. 

    I much prefer this method to arming teachers only because of personal family feedback. Both my mother and her sister were educators and good ones, but they would have been discouraged if they’d been required to carry firearms. My mother has long since retired but feels strongly that teachers are distracted by too many things other than teaching as it is!

    Most of the proposals are not to require teachers to carry guns, but simply require schools to allow staff to carry guns, under the same rules as concealed carry elsewhere in public.  However:

    I approve of specialization. Teachers should focus upon encouraging kids to learn and to reiterate Sean Hannity’s commentary last night, let’s put school security in the hands of retired police officers and military personnel.

    Let the experts excel in their individual arenas.

    Defense against armed assailants is one of the few things in society that cannot be left to the experts, because there’s no time/opportunity in the midst of an event to call them in.  There was a day when chivalrous men would free women of the need to protect themselves, but those days are gone.

     

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  6. Defense against armed assailants is one of the few things in society that cannot be left to the experts, because there’s no time/opportunity in the midst of an event to call them in.

    I’m not suggesting in the least that we call in the experts; I’m suggesting we spend the dollars to keep them on staff full-time. Let teachers teach and experienced law enforcement/military personnel maintain security for the entire school year. You misinterpreted my comment entirely.

    Preventive medicine is always cheaper than the cure.

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  7. More people that you want to admit have had dangerous impulses. For most of us, they are controlled by the knowledge that we will die if we acted on an angry impulse. The brain deals in self protection as a priority most of the time.

    If you take a person who has a period of anger and add “Gun Free Zones” to the mix, you are saying they can have a target rich environment.

    This fantasy of safe zones must end. Safety comes from certain death to the angry impulse, not words and slogans.

    If we believe our children are precious, then why do we have armed guards for our money at the bank and not for our kids at school?

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  8. TempTime:
    Can the “experts” be that stupid?

    Yes, though the expression cognitive bias describes it better. Everyone has a tendency to project hindsight into the past, attributing prescience to themselves: “Anyone could have seen that coming.” Self-styled experts are worse because they think they have cause to be smarter and more informed than the rest of us.

    There’s also a selection bias for experts who appear in the media that favors the more assertive ones. Which would you rather have on your TV program: the expert who says, “I saw this coming” or the one who says, “These things are not predictable and I have no idea why this happened”? The fact the second statement is closer to the truth is irrelevant. People seek coherent explanations for events even if none exist.

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  9. EThompson:
    Preventive medicine is always cheaper than the cure.

    This is not true in medicine and it’s not true in broader society either. There are costs* and benefits to preventive efforts. Much medical literature is devoted to discovering if the benefits exceed the costs of a proposed preventive measure. Likewise, having law enforcement on site at every school in the nation is not without its costs. For instance, given that there are finite resources for law enforcement, would existing (or additional) officers best be deployed guarding each and every school or elsewhere?

    *Cost does not just mean dollars. Preventive measures sometimes also cause harm.

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  10. EThompson:
    Defense against armed assailants is one of the few things in society that cannot be left to the experts, because there’s no time/opportunity in the midst of an event to call them in.

    I’m not suggesting in the least that we call in the experts; I’m suggesting we spend the dollars to keep them on staff full-time. Let teachers teach and experienced law enforcement/military personnel maintain security for the entire school year. You misinterpreted my comment entirely.

    Preventive medicine is always cheaper than the cure.

    I didn’t misinterpret you.  I reject your implied assertion that such staffing can be both sufficient and affordable on a widespread scale.  You are talking about multiples of the current total of all local police in this country.  And if they aren’t going to be sworn law officers, what value are they adding beyond voluntarily armed teachers?

    As for preventive medicine, what’s wrong with vaccinating (arming) everyone who wishes?

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  11. TKC 1101:
    If we believe our children are precious, then why do we have armed guards for our money at the bank and not for our kids at school?

    A simple and obvious answer is that money is a far more attractive target for criminals than children are. The preciousness argument does not account for how many criminals are interested in robbing banks versus shooting schoolkids.

    Even with armed guards at banks, there are far more bank robberies per year than school shootings. This points to two problems with the comparison:

    1. The availability heuristic: School shootings are reported in the national media for days while bank robberies are not. The vastly greater attention to school shootings make them seem more frequent.
    2. The threat to banks is clearly much greater: Even with armed guards at banks, there are still thousands of bank robberies per year.
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  12. I think one must look at the second-order effects.  It isn’t so much a matter as whether some unknown fraction of teachers are armed compared to a visible armed guard at the school, but rather whether a potential attacker perceives the school to be a soft or hard target.  If the school is prominently labelled as a “gun-free zone”, the attacker knows they’ll be unopposed in what amounts to a free fire zone.  If there’s the possibility teachers and/or administrators may be carrying, they can’t assume that, and have to factor in the possibility that their attack will come to an ignominious end as soon as they are seen to be brandishing a weapon.

    There’s no way to account for the number of attacks deterred by the uncertainty on the part of potential attackers about those who may oppose them, but we’re observing the frequency of attacks when aggressors are confident they will be unopposed.

    One might, for example, compare the number of hold-ups which occur in businesses which declare themselves “gun-free zones” and gun stores which, for the most part, don’t.

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  13. What causes a person to think that going on a shooting spree will help? Part of me hates the news coverage because some people who are unstable will think this is an option to get even. Those people need to know there are better ways to deal with people they don’t get along with.

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  14. John Walker:There’s no way to account for the number of attacks deterred by the uncertainty on the part of potential attackers about those who may oppose them, but we’re observing the frequency of attacks when aggressors are confident they will be unopposed.

    I think this is an important aspect of the problem.  I heard one (only one) person suggest people/students need to have the mindset to defend themselves.  And they must also learn to “think” defensively.   People must learn how to react without hesitation to  “defend and survive”.  One should be ready to run, hide, yes, but when necessary they must also be ready to actively defend … throw a backpack at the attacker, a chair, a desk, anything, everything  … whatever you need to do, do it!  People say but he had a gun!   So what, ever try to hit your target while being hit in the face with a backpack and ducking to avoid a chair hurled at you?   Please, we really need to teach our children to be ready to defend themselves and also teach them a sense of self-reliance.  Teach them to defend when necessary for survival and to not wait for the Calvary to arrive — it frequently doesn’t, and when it does, it is usually too late.

    I have often wondered in so many situations, why don’t people seem to think to fight back?  Where is the self-defense mentality?

    I once was a victim of an strong-arm robbery … my very first reaction was to run after the thief shouting give me back my purse.  I took a few seconds to recognize that it was dark, I was mostly alone (in a grocery store parking lot), and no one was coming to help.  The thief jumped into a waiting car, which then began backing up towards me (the woman running and screaming at them) before I realized I needed to stop running, stop screaming and take cover between two nearby cars, which I did quickly.  The thieves then drove off into the night.   In hindsight, my actions may have been foolish or even stupid; but that’s what I did.   My point?  Win or lose, my first instinctual reaction was to fight back.    Am I an anomaly?

    Criminals and the mass murderers seem too confident that they will not encounter opposition; we need to change their minds, their expectations.   Uncertainty and immediate negative consequences can be deterrents.

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  15. Column by Charles Hurt:

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/feb/15/see-something-say-something-lie-florida-school-sho/

    In this latest case, the FBI was reportedly informed that some nut job named “Nikolas Cruz” announced “Im gonna be a professional school shooter” a few months back.

    Funny thing, a kid named “Nikolas Cruz” was also kicked out of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, and was considered such a threat that the kid was specifically banned from carrying a backpack on school grounds.

    Something was seen. Something was said. Yet nothing was done.

    The FBI apparently followed up but determined it was a dead end.

    Understandably, the feds and TSA and local police and school officials have day jobs. They cannot run down every lead.

    So, my question is: Why make the stupid promise behind “See something, say something”?

    Meanwhile, Nikolas Cruz was all but voted Most Likely to Shoot up the School. He was kicked out. He was listed as a security threat.

    He made little secret of his twisted mind on social media and in conversations with other students.

    Everybody saw something. Nobody did anything.

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  16. I enjoyed your post TempTime and the variety of responses it invoked.

    I’d like to summarize my point of view on the subject of school massacres:

    1.  A longtime acquaintance is a retired narcotics detective for the NYPD and the conversations I have had with him about his job revolved around the infamous ‘tells’ that cops learn in both the police academy and on the beat. He was particularly irate about de Blasio’s suspension of “stop and frisk” because cops don’t usually look at race; there are numerous forms of body language that communicate everything they need to know. He advises his kids (Jersey residents) to stay aware of these ‘signals’ while in school and speaks once or twice a year to classrooms in the tri-state area. He would be an excellent candidate to stand guard at  entry points of schools and admires the methods of the Israelis.

    2. It isn’t prohibitively expensive to appoint one or two guards to schools. A lot of these individuals are retired professionals with comfortable pensions and are less interested in the money than contributing to the safety of society. Most of them are truly concerned citizens as is my friend and miss the responsibilities of their previous jobs. They also understand the nature of protecting citizens and worry about placing that kind of responsibility on non-professionals (i.e. teachers).

    Let’s take advantage of this bonanza of retired talent!

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  17. I am not backing down on this. All teachers should be required to be armed, and take training, and be given range sessions monthly. All staff in the school should get this. In every School.

    Using Guns ought to be a normal American thing, like it used to be. In WWI, our boys were far better shots than the Euroweenies.

    This would fix the school shooting issues pretty well.

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  18. @EThompson,  Thanks.  I, too, have really enjoyed the comments and differing perspectives shared.   But what I really like is that it was accomplished without “spitting”.

    I have a couple other questions I’d also like to seek thoughts/opinions.

    I will try to post one or two this weekend.   Just waiting for the “weather” to cool off a little.

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  19. Bryan G. Stephens:
     
    This would fix the school shooting issues pretty well.

    Bryan, I agree with nearly everything you post but I have to ask you if “All teachers should be required to be armed, and take training, and be given range sessions monthly,” then when do they get the time to teach Shakespeare, calculus, debate, grammar, biology? This was disturbing to read:
    U.S. now ranks near the bottom among 35 industrialized nations …

  20. Bryan G. Stephens:
    I am not backing down on this. All teachers should be required to be armed, and take training, and be given range sessions monthly. All staff in the school should get this. In every School.

    I would quibble with this.  It would be excellent were all teachers armed, trained, and exercised on the range.  But they are not commandos or cops, but rather deterrents.  If one in five teachers were packing a Glock 17 (or equivalent) and trained only to the extent to “point the business end at the bad guy and only pull the trigger when aiming at somebody you want to kill” their pupils would be much safer than the “cuck and cower” strategy promoted by the quisling media.

    Sure, some of the teachers wouldn’t know what to do.  Some may shoot themselves in the leg.  Some may even shoot their own students.  But the mere fact of their existence would reduce the probability of a mass-shooter carrying out their malign mission by an order of magnitude.

    It’s all about deterrence.  Coward shooters don’t shoot up armed targets.  “Gun-free zones” invite them in.

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  21. John Walker:
    If one in five teachers were packing a Glock 17 (or equivalent) and trained only to the extent to “point the business end at the bad guy and only pull the trigger when aiming at somebody you want to kill” their pupils would be much safer than the “cuck and cower” strategy promoted by the quisling media.

    I agree wholeheartedly.  If the school district were allowed to ask for teacher and staff volunteers to undertake a review for carrying their weapon of choice on school property, that would dramatically improve school safety.  There are lots of teachers with military experience, and even some who are former police.  We don’t need every teacher to take training, but if some teachers were allowed to substitute range time for some of their required continuing education, we could create a situation in which schools were not automatically considered soft targets.

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  22. MJBubba:

    We don’t need every teacher to take training, but if some teachers were allowed to substitute range time for some of their required continuing education, we could create a situation in which schools were not automatically considered soft targets.

    If we require teachers to take time from continuing education, that compromises the academic future of our students. Again, there are retired cops/military personnel ready, willing and able to take on these security issues. Most importantly, these individuals can keep it out of the classrooms. If a teacher has to use a firearm, this means the intruder has infiltrated the interior of the school and there will be carnage.

    Why on earth are we not willing to learn from the Israelis who do exactly this? They are indeed the experts on all things regarding safety.

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