19 thoughts on “Washington’s Birthday Pix”

  1. Thanks, @Trinity Waters, for these lovely images. May I ask in what general part of the country they are taken?

    What do the fish do in the cold season? What do you have to do for them in the cold season?

    In upstate New York, Vassal Lands of Cuomo and the Lords of the City, we raise Herefords, who grow thick haircoats, eat lots of hay, and shelter out of the wind, while any small calves get grain when they wish it. I can’t imagine koi bestirring themselves in any comparable fashion. Can you set me straight on this?

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  2. jzdro, I’m at 45 and change latitude, 122 and change longitude, about 20 miles due south of PDX.  Koi, being cold blooded critters, have metabolism that goes with their ambient temp.  I’ve got a sensor in my water, and below about 49 degrees, they lose interest in their kibbles.  Even if they don’t lose interest, you don’t want to feed them below that temp, as their digestive tract is essentially shut down, and any food ingested will lay in their gut and rot before it is digested, causing problems up to and including death.  If it goes down to and stays colder than about 20 degrees, the surface of the pond will freeze, but not very thickly.  At these times I do two things.  I slow down the waterfall as it will super cool the water if it’s running vigorously and cold fish don’t need much oxygenation from it.  I also put out a floating heater to ensure that the ice doesn’t cover the pond completely, as the fish are still respirating, albeit slowly, and a port is needed for gas exchange.  Other than that, they hunker down on the bottom which is about 5 feet deep, and just hang out.  When warm weather returns and they begin feeding, I first provide them with food that has been soaked in several specific chemicals; that jump starts their immune system.  In today’s picture you can’t see the fish as they’re on the bottom.  When it warms up, they’ll be begging!  They know who their daddy is…

    4+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  3. Pencilvania:
    Gorgeous!  Must be even gorgeouser when spring arrives!

    Pencil, I hate to be a Grammar Baddie but it should be “Must be evener gorgeous when spring arrives!” Gorgeouser is not even a word. No need to thank me.

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  4. Trin, when you said I would be fed and have a place to bathe and wash my clothes if I stayed with you I naturally thought I would get a room too. Was I wrong?

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  5.  

     When it warms up, they’ll be begging!  They know who their daddy is…

    That sounds familiar. The critters let you know: you are their farmer and you need to hop to it.

    Lovely photos.

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  6. 1/10,000,000th of a Megabuck,

    Oh, yeah, you’ll have view alright!  The index of refraction will make me better looking, too.  But, sorry to report, no clothes dryer and hope you like spirulina and the occasional snatch of algae.  I still promise to intermittently love you.

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  7. Trinity Waters:
    1/10,000,000th of a Megabuck,

    Oh, yeah, you’ll have view alright!  The index of refraction will make me better looking, too.  But, sorry to report, no clothes dryer and hope you like spirulina and the occasional snatch of algae.  I still promise to intermittently love you.

    This sounds like I will be in the drink not given a drink. Are you going to smother/drown me with kindness, Trin? Remember cotton is a breathable fiber.

    1+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  8. @Trinity Waters, you and many others watch the thermometer every day and do what needs to be done, especially in the late winter and early spring, when the weather fluctuates.

    For mammals, the danger comes from the fact that temperature fluctuations come with fluctuations in humidity, so that pneumonia becomes a threat in these conditions. People work hard to keep barn air healthful. People with bottomland pasture near creeks move the cattle upland and away from the fog and mists.

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  9. jzdro:
    @Trinity Waters, you and many others watch the thermometer every day and do what needs to be done, especially in the late winter and early spring, when the weather fluctuates.

    For mammals, the danger comes from the fact that temperature fluctuations come with fluctuations in humidity, so that pneumonia becomes a threat in these conditions. People work hard to keep barn air healthful. People with bottomland pasture near creeks move the cattle upland and away from the fog and mists.

    jzdro, how long have you been on a farm?

    0

  10. Lo, these many years – all in this part of the country. But these imperatives are the same all over the country.

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  11. So, I woke up in the middle of the night worried that you recirculate the water in your koi pond! It doesn’t recirculate, right? Or does it? If it does, what treatment does it get before it returns to the pond? And does that treatment change with the seasons?

    And just out of nosiness, what is the immune system stimulant you give them at Spring Wake-Up?  All I can imagine are micronutrients like maybe cobalt or magnesium. But I don’t know from fish.

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  12. jzdro, my pond recirculates constantly.  I lower the flow in the winter.  The water flows down into the pond via a three foot waterfall/river rock decline.  The exposure to air oxygenates the water, a must in summer when the fish are very active.

    Inline, between the intake skimmers and the pond return is a bio-filter that contains plastic beads that maximize surface area for biological action.  It removes sediment and helps denature the fish poop.  Mine backflushes just like a pool sand filter.  The ejecta goes out onto the rough of hole 14 of the OGA golf course in our backyard.  Very convenient.  Lacking that, it would be pumped into the roadway runoff drain.

    The additives for immunostimulation are mainly vitamins, and I also give them an additive that eliminates anaerobic aeromona infectious bacteria.

    This whole topic is huge and if you need more info, I can recommend our club’s website: NWKG.org.

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  13. Just butting in here, 10 Cents: this is functionally equivalent to cow doctors and their dairymen clients worrying about and fussing over barn ventilation systems, for cow barns and for calf barns.

    Yay, Ratburger, for enabling this sort of comparison. From these comparisons we can, potentially, infer useful ideas and principles applicable to various problems.

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar

Leave a Reply