24 Kids

My new camera system is now optimized, so when we’re out and about we can keep an eye on the Koi.  This camera gives me an overhead view of most of the pond.  Even the clock is set…

Per previous posts, this makes me extremely grateful.

Have a rewarding day, Ratburghers, especially the latest arrivals.  They have made my gratefulness index climb.

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20 thoughts on “24 Kids”

  1. EThompson:
    You really do own some beauties here; love the assortment of colors and patterns!

    That was our goal in choosing the fish.  We don’t show our Koi competitively, although a couple are contenders, so we just looked for a nice color mix.

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  2. 10 Cents:

    Trinity Waters:

    Doctor Bass Monkey:
    I find Dime is often coy and loves a good fish tale

    The tale of the Koi, and the rest of their body for that matter, is just pretty Carp.

    Keep it up and I will pond one of you guys.

    Don’t wrinkle your fins.  I’ve been in my pond; fell off the waterfall and luckily didn’t sock my noggin on a rock.  Smelly.  I don’t relish a return.

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  3. How long have you had your pond, and have you continued to add koi over the years or populate it exclusively with successive generations from the founders?

    I ask because our pond has been running for around 25 years, all descended from the bunch of brightly-coloured tiddlers with which we initially stocked it (nothing fancy, just orange, yellow, multi-colour, ghost, etc., and no weird alien-looking things: just regular torpedo-shaped fish).  What we found is that it didn’t take many generations for a severe reversion to the mean to occur.  Just about all of the fish in the pond are now essentially ancestral carp: dark brown with only  a hint of variation.  Now, this could indicate that the fancy colours selected for by breeders are recessive and not genetically stable, or it may be the effect of natural selection due to the heron and ducks which regularly patrol the pond and can’t easily see the muddy-coloured ones in our less-than-pellucid water.

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  4. John Walker:
    How long have you had your pond, and have you continued to add koi over the years or populate it exclusively with successive generations from the founders?

    I ask because our pond has been running for around 25 years, all descended from the bunch of brightly-coloured tiddlers with which we initially stocked it (nothing fancy, just orange, yellow, multi-colour, ghost, etc., and no weird alien-looking things: just regular torpedo-shaped fish).  What we found is that it didn’t take many generations for a severe reversion to the mean to occur.  Just about all of the fish in the pond are now essentially ancestral carp: dark brown with only  a hint of variation.  Now, this could indicate that the fancy colours selected for by breeders are recessive and not genetically stable, or it may be the effect of natural selection due to the heron and ducks which regularly patrol the pond and can’t easily see the muddy-coloured ones in our less-than-pellucid water.

    We’ve had it for 16 and a half years.  The fish born in the pond are the luck of the draw.  Three years ago, we had fourteen black koi, not the dark brown of their antecedents, but black.  We had two black fish for luck (Japanese superstition) and they apparently had a lot of love to share.  Our luck is that hole 13 has a large water hazard, just about half a block up the course.  We stock it with unwanteds, much to the joy of the local Osprey.  Cycle of life and all that.

    Most of the fish are various ages, and only four were born in the pond.  Some we adopted from our local NWKG.org club.  You’re right about the Heron liking the small flashy ones.  We quit buying small fish and put up an electric fence.  I shot the largest Heron in the head one day with my pellet rifle, knocking him out for a few minutes, but he recovered.  Didn’t return, though.

    I know the cure for less-than-pellucid water.  John, let me know; my consultation fee is $0.

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  5. John Walker:
    Now, this could indicate that the fancy colours selected for by breeders are recessive and not genetically stable, or it may be the effect of natural selection due to the heron and ducks which regularly patrol the pond and can’t easily see the muddy-coloured ones in our less-than-pellucid water.

    Obviously, TW is the expert here but after having a koi pond for 10 years in a highly tropical (read highly dangerous climate), I did notice that my beautiful silvery white koi disappeared mysteriously; perhaps easy prey?

    This made me think about the fact that polar bears (who were once brown) are now snowy white and blend in beautifully to their environment of ice and snow.

     

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  6. EThompson:

    John Walker:
    Now, this could indicate that the fancy colours selected for by breeders are recessive and not genetically stable, or it may be the effect of natural selection due to the heron and ducks which regularly patrol the pond and can’t easily see the muddy-coloured ones in our less-than-pellucid water.

    Obviously, TW is the expert here but after having a koi pond for 10 years in a highly tropical (read highly dangerous climate), I did notice that my beautiful silvery white koi disappeared mysteriously; perhaps easy prey?

    This made me think about the fact that polar bears (who were once brown) are now snowy white and blend in beautifully to their environment of ice and snow.

     

    It’s both.

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  7. I was too young to remember it but our house had a pond with a map of Japan on the bottom of it. I don’t know if there were fish or not.

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  8. It’s both.  Show stock results from intensive selection by breeders of show stock; I’ll wager that is true for all Classes of animal. Release the selection pressure and the line reverts in the direction of original stock – in the survivors. At the same time, flashy traits attract predators, so there you go.

    Hunh –  the Greeks invented pottery. There you go. (Pssst, psst.)

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  9. jzdro:
    It’s both.  Show stock results from intensive selection by breeders of show stock; I’ll wager that is true for all Classes of animal. Release the selection pressure and the line reverts in the direction of original stock – in the survivors. At the same time, flashy traits attract predators, so there you go.

    Hunh –  the Greeks invented pottery. There you go. (Pssst, psst.)

    I don’t like your Pssst, but you’re right about selection  At the end of the day (barf), my dog is prettier than your dog.

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  10. Hi, TW,

    I don’t like your Pssst, 

    That line is from My Big Fat Greek Wedding. It’s all about the Dad saying There you go and spraying from his Windex spray bottle.

    Sorry TW – you have to know the movie get the joke!

     

     

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  11. jzdro:
    Hi, TW,

    I don’t like your Pssst, 

    That line is from My Big Fat Greek Wedding. It’s all about the Dad saying There you go and spraying from his Windex spray bottle.

    Sorry TW – you have to know the movie get the joke!

     

     

    I’d forgotten about that.  Your reference was a bit oblique.  Love that movie.  Sincere apologies.  I’m not Greek, but I’m all in favor of Windex!

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  12. jzdro:
    Sorry to be oblique. Congratulations on the24 youngstock!

    This is a serious site. No humor that Trinity Waters can understand will be allowed. (This gives us plenty of leeway.)

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  13. 10 Cents:

    jzdro:
    Sorry to be oblique. Congratulations on the24 youngstock!

    This is a serious site. No humor that Trinity Waters can understand will be allowed. (This gives us plenty of leeway.)

    Been waiting for the counter punch.  Still waiting, Sir Sock.  Be advised that I own an attack English Cocker, and she’s frosty.  She’s freshly groomed, by yours truly, and is lookin’ for trouble.

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  14. Trinity Waters:

    10 Cents:

    jzdro:
    Sorry to be oblique. Congratulations on the24 youngstock!

    This is a serious site. No humor that Trinity Waters can understand will be allowed. (This gives us plenty of leeway.)

    Been waiting for the counter punch.  Still waiting, Sir Sock.  Be advised that I own an attack English Cocker, and she’s frosty.  She’s freshly groomed, by yours truly, and is lookin’ for trouble.

    I know when I’m licked, Trin.

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  15. 10 Cents:

    Trinity Waters:

    10 Cents:

    jzdro:
    Sorry to be oblique. Congratulations on the24 youngstock!

    This is a serious site. No humor that Trinity Waters can understand will be allowed. (This gives us plenty of leeway.)

    Been waiting for the counter punch.  Still waiting, Sir Sock.  Be advised that I own an attack English Cocker, and she’s frosty.  She’s freshly groomed, by yours truly, and is lookin’ for trouble.

    I know when I’m licked, Trin.

    Perfect! G’nite.

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