Knowledge Base: Avatars, Profiles, Posts, and Comments

A series of changes recently made to the site are intended to improve navigation around the site and make it easier to keep track of your own activity and that of other members.  For complete implementation details, see the posts on the Updates group, which is usually updated around 22:00 UTC on any day in which the site’s software or configuration has been changed.

Avatars are the small round images which identify users.  Users can upload their own avatars or use avatars posted on the Gravatar site under the same E-mail address they used when registering their Ratburger membership.  Avatars appear on main page posts and comments, and on group posts and comments, along with the user’s name, which identifies people who haven’t uploaded an avatar image.  For likes on posts and comments, only avatars are shown, but you can “mouse over” or “hover” above the avatar to see the user’s name as a pop-up title.  On almost every place you see an avatar on the site, you can click it to display the user’s Profile page.

Profile pages are a one-stop shop for information about users.  A user’s profile shows you:

  • Display name (“John Walker”)
  • Avatar
  • Account name (“@johnwalker”)
  • Time of last activity
  • Description or biography, if any
  • “Party card number” (Order in joining the site)
  • Date joined

Below this information is a menu which allows you to view additional information about the user, including:

  • Activity in groups in which the user participates
  • Profile of the user
  • Friends of the user
  • Groups of which the user is a member
  • Posts made by the user since joining the site
  • Comments made by the user since joining the site

In addition, when viewing your own profile, additional information is available such as Notifications and Messages, plus the ability to edit most of the profile fields.  When viewing your own posts and comments, there are links that let you edit them.

(A note on “Party card numbers”: some users will have party card numbers which are greater than the number of members shown in the “At a Glance” section of the Dashboard.  This is because these numbers [formally, within the WordPress software, user IDs] are assigned when an account is created and never reused.  If an account fails to complete registration, is closed,  or is banned due to spamming or other misbehaviour, it will have a party card number which corresponds to no active account.  Like many other parties, Ratburger has “unpersons”.)

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Author: John Walker

Founder of Ratburger.org, Autodesk, Inc., and Marinchip Systems. Author of The Hacker's Diet. Creator of www.fourmilab.ch.

13 thoughts on “Knowledge Base: Avatars, Profiles, Posts, and Comments”

  1. Dime:
    What?! I am only Party No. 9! I should have waited to get the coveted 10 spot. “I was robbed.”

    Actually, as I recall, you had a lower number, but closed that account and re-opened it after several other people had registered.  The number for a closed account is never re-used, since it still identifies content posted by the departed member.

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  2. John Walker:

    Dime:
    What?! I am only Party No. 9! I should have waited to get the coveted 10 spot. “I was robbed.”

    Actually, as I recall, you had a lower number, but closed that account and re-opened it after several other people had registered.  The number for a closed account is never re-used, since it still identifies content posted by the departed member.

    I notice the person pounding the gavel is No. 2. Hmm.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0LaT6qVRpg

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  3. John Walker:

    Doctor Bass Monkey:
    Vivre le singe!

    May I be irritating, as everybody who speaks French is?  You’re absolutely right that «singe» takes «le».  That’s unusual—many words that end with «e» take «la», although there are exceptions: 99% of «…age» take «le» and there are others.  But «vivre» is the infinitive of the verb “to live”.  In this construction, which harks back to Middle French, you want the subjunctive, “Vive”, as in “Vive la France”.  The subjunctive has gone so much out of use in English that it is difficult to translate literally, but I’ll try: “That France shall live”, or more poetically, “That [God, Providence, History, our actions, etc.] shall cause France to live.”  It’s the conditional in the phrase which requires the subjunctive mood in the verb.

    «Vive le singe!»

    (Note that mother tongue speakers and those deeply marinated in the language don’t think about verbs and conditionals for a millisecond. They simply say «Vive» because it sounds right. It’s only people who have learned a language in adulthood who worry about grammar and why you should say that.)

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  4. John Walker:

    John Walker:

    Doctor Bass Monkey:
    Vivre le singe!

    May I be irritating, as everybody who speaks French is?  You’re absolutely right that «singe» takes «le».  That’s unusual—many words that end with «e» take «la», although there are exceptions: 99% of «…age» take «le» and there are others.  But «vivre» is the infinitive of the verb “to live”.  In this construction, which harks back to Middle French, you want the subjunctive, “Vive”, as in “Vive la France”.  The subjunctive has gone so much out of use in English that it is difficult to translate literally, but I’ll try: “That France shall live”, or more poetically, “That [God, Providence, History, our actions, etc.] shall cause France to live.”  It’s the conditional in the phrase which requires the subjunctive mood in the verb.

    «Vive le singe!»

    It’s okay; I don’t speak French. Dime thinks I barely speak English without subtitles

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  5.  

    Doctor Bass Monkey:

    John Walker:

    John Walker:

    Doctor Bass Monkey:
    Vivre le singe!

    May I be irritating, as everybody who speaks French is?  You’re absolutely right that «singe» takes «le».  That’s unusual—many words that end with «e» take «la», although there are exceptions: 99% of «…age» take «le» and there are others.  But «vivre» is the infinitive of the verb “to live”.  In this construction, which harks back to Middle French, you want the subjunctive, “Vive”, as in “Vive la France”.  The subjunctive has gone so much out of use in English that it is difficult to translate literally, but I’ll try: “That France shall live”, or more poetically, “That [God, Providence, History, our actions, etc.] shall cause France to live.”  It’s the conditional in the phrase which requires the subjunctive mood in the verb.

    «Vive le singe!»

    It’s okay; I don’t speak French. Dime thinks I barely speak English without subtitles

    I never knew a Grammar Nazi could be French. Is this what Haakon was trying to tell me?

    Minky, can I call you Prisoner No. 6? “I am not a NUMBER! I’m an ape!”

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  6. Dime:
     

    Doctor Bass Monkey:

    John Walker:

    John Walker:

    Doctor Bass Monkey:
    Vivre le singe!

    May I be irritating, as everybody who speaks French is?  You’re absolutely right that «singe» takes «le».  That’s unusual—many words that end with «e» take «la», although there are exceptions: 99% of «…age» take «le» and there are others.  But «vivre» is the infinitive of the verb “to live”.  In this construction, which harks back to Middle French, you want the subjunctive, “Vive”, as in “Vive la France”.  The subjunctive has gone so much out of use in English that it is difficult to translate literally, but I’ll try: “That France shall live”, or more poetically, “That [God, Providence, History, our actions, etc.] shall cause France to live.”  It’s the conditional in the phrase which requires the subjunctive mood in the verb.

    «Vive le singe!»

    It’s okay; I don’t speak French. Dime thinks I barely speak English without subtitles

    I never knew a Grammar Nazi could be French. Is this what Haakon was trying to tell me?

    Minky, can I call you Prisoner No. 6? “I am not a NUMBER! I’m an ape!”

    Somewhere, Patrick McGoohan is smiling

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  7. The subjunctive has gone so much out of use in English that it is difficult to translate literally, but I’ll try: “That France shall live”, or more poetically, “That [God, Providence, History, our actions, etc.] shall cause France to live.”  It’s the conditional in the phrase which requires the subjunctive mood in the verb.

    I always understood the subjunctive to be, “May France live,” or, “That France may live.” It can also be translated, especially in the 1st person plural, as “Let us live.”

    That’s how we learn it in my Latin class currently.

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