The Pruitt thing to do

I realize maybe the admin is relieved to get rid of Pruitt, but still,  after seeing the video of that cheeky, self-righteous  b—-   accosta-ing  him in that restaurant,  I wish he had said, “Put the kid down, l’il sister, and I’ll throw my drink in your face. ”

In-effing-tolerable.

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48 thoughts on “The Pruitt thing to do”

  1. Phil Turmel:
    I’ll bet PHP is at the top of that list… O-:=

    The top of the list seems to rotate over time as new horrors appear.  Yes, at the moment, I’d say PHP is at the top.

    Near the bottom, I have an inordinate fondness for Perl, having written a 625 page program [PDF] in it which currently has more than 30,000 users and has barely been touched since I put it into production in 2007, and Haskell, which is in some ways intensely irritating but never fails to give me a feeling of satisfaction that I’ve done something right when I’m done.

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  2. EThompson:
    You know John I would swear in court that I have never run into a person who references  computer code on events as much as you do.  While it may be common in your community (coworkers etc.) It is not common where I grew up or where I work. …. it sounded very bizarre and actually got under my skin a bit.  

    I could swear, people who say that about me must be stuck in some kind of “for (;;)” loop.  Getting them out can be as difficult as dealing with a deadly embrace in critical section locking or solving the halting problem in a Turing machine.

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  3. 10 Cents:

    Robert A. McReynolds:
    The thing about Pruitt leaving is that it is so close to that shrieking harpy chastising him in public. So this [10Ad:Coarse Language] gets to claim “I drove him out.” I hate it when the GOP gives these damn people propaganda victories.

    Robert, you know the limits, don’t you?

    I thought I could sanitize that enough. She is one though we all know that.

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  4. EThompson:

    OmegaPaladin:
    While it may be common in your community (coworkers etc.) It is not common where I grew up or where I work.

    So what? Does that mean I should shut up about my interests because they aren’t common among your neighborhood? Maybe, as I always have, you should open up your eyes and take in the world; you may learn something.

    I have no clue about Evangelism or Catholicism (they were most certainly not common where I grew up) but that would hardly be an excuse to call JJ’s posts “slightly bizarre.” Perhaps because I was a lit major in college and an avid reader, I am always curious about that which is on the other side. You apparently are not.

    I didn’t know a damn thing about classical music before I went to Vienna; now I would consider myself a minor expert and all the better for it.

    Same goes for Austrian art, historical biographies, military history, the NHL, and Wall Street. I consider myself a pretty well-rounded person and if you sat me down at any dinner table on this planet I could spark and carry a conversation for hours.

    You?

    Liz,

    Feel free to call JJ’s post slightly bizarre. We can handle things like that here.

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  5. I appreciate your aggressive, relentless debating style EThompson.   I can definitely see why you went for Trump – he takes on his enemies in a similar fashion.

    That said, the original point I made was about references to market performance in threads completely unrelated to said market.  You responded that I need to get out more and that I resent capitalism.  (Also to stay away from the US Treasury – do I need to sell the Treasury notes I bought?  I hope I am not getting billed for the investing advice!)

    My response was to those points – I do actually know a lot of people, and I do not ever recall running into someone who would remark on random events that X made their stocks go up.  The only place I had ever seen that kind of behavior is in leftist caricatures of  businessmen and women.  You are not that caricature – you certainly seem to care about the average worker than any of these supposed Worker’s Party goons (much less their idea of what a capitalist is) – but I do not want you to be seen as such by potential members.

    Now, if you made a thread about stock analysis, I think that would be awesome.  Hell, that would make an interesting weekly feature – “Bears, Bulls, and Rats” perhaps?  We’ve already got a sports thread.   Maybe not as awesome as MLR doing a cheerleader thread, but close!  I do enjoy learning new things, provided I have some interest in the subject.

    Oh and this is not like R>.  There we would have both been sent to the time-out corner and all of our stuff would be redacted.

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  6. OmegaPaladin:
    Oh and this is not like R>.  There we would have both been sent to the time-out corner and all of our stuff would be redacted.

    This is a key point.  This has been an open discussion among members, visible to all other members (and, for that matter, everybody since posts and comments are visible to non-members), on which administrators have commented, also entirely in the open.  This is the antithesis of banning, time-outs, and private actions.

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  7. EThompson:
    10 Cents:I like you, Liz but I agree with the statement “I have literally never met a person that focused on stocks like you do.”

    I interpret this as saying don’t dare talk about an issue we’re not involved or interested in. Would it have been ok if I had taken a hit at JJ as opposed to engaging with her and respecting her beliefs?

    You and many members have decided it’s ok to talk about anything but money (an interest of mine to be sure) with absolutely no respect for the many other topics I have discussed previously. I certainly hope for Trinity Waters’ sake there are no issues with koi that come up with the Scarlet Letter Committee.

    Perhaps I don’t belong here. You tell me.

    My fish have personally told me that they approve of your plan to create a Koi pond at your new residence.  All my Koi proudly display their nativist desire to make more Koi, in spite of possibly being marked as prolific, and they sure as Hell approve of us having enough moolah to feed them.  In addition, they are now breathing more shallowly knowing that you are under siege.

    Facebook doesn’t sell coal, so screw them.

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  8. Trinity Waters:

    EThompson:
    10 Cents:I like you, Liz but I agree with the statement “I have literally never met a person that focused on stocks like you do.”

    I interpret this as saying don’t dare talk about an issue we’re not involved or interested in. Would it have been ok if I had taken a hit at JJ as opposed to engaging with her and respecting her beliefs?

    You and many members have decided it’s ok to talk about anything but money (an interest of mine to be sure) with absolutely no respect for the many other topics I have discussed previously. I certainly hope for Trinity Waters’ sake there are no issues with koi that come up with the Scarlet Letter Committee.

    Perhaps I don’t belong here. You tell me.

    My fish have personally told me that they approve of your plan to create a Koi pond at your new residence.  All my Koi proudly display their nativist desire to make more Koi, in spite of possibly being marked as prolific, and they sure as Hell approve of us having enough moolah to feed them.  In addition, they are now breathing more shallowly knowing that you are under siege.

    Facebook doesn’t sell coal, so screw them.

    Trin, does it always have to end up with something about your fish? Pretty soon you will be pulling out your slide projector.

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  9. 10 Cents:
    Trin, does it always have to end up with something about your fish? Pretty soon you will be pulling out your slide projector.

    Hope so; his beauties are almost as interesting to me as NASDAQ.

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  10. EThompson:

    10 Cents:
    Trin, does it always have to end up with something about your fish? Pretty soon you will be pulling out your slide projector.

    Hope so; his beauties are almost as interesting to me as NASDAQ.

    [caption id="attachment_9599" align="alignnone" width="750"] Always hungry.  The black one near the center is what the Japanese consider a lucky fish for one’s pond.  He came from a litter of 14 black ones.[/caption]

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  11. Trinity Waters:

    EThompson:

    10 Cents:
    Trin, does it always have to end up with something about your fish? Pretty soon you will be pulling out your slide projector.

    Hope so; his beauties are almost as interesting to me as NASDAQ.

    Always hungry.  The black one near the center is what the Japanese consider a lucky fish for one’s pond.  He came from a litter of 14 black ones.

    Wowser! You must have had some professional breeding experience here. I’ve seen $500 dollar koi before that can’t even compare to yours. I especially admire the orange/blk/white multi in the upper left part of the photo.

    You’re right about their appetites. Feeding time was always my favorite time of the day because they all came out of hiding and I was able to get the panoramic view!

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  12. EThompson:

    Trinity Waters:

    EThompson:

    10 Cents:
    Trin, does it always have to end up with something about your fish? Pretty soon you will be pulling out your slide projector.

    Hope so; his beauties are almost as interesting to me as NASDAQ.

    Always hungry.  The black one near the center is what the Japanese consider a lucky fish for one’s pond.  He came from a litter of 14 black ones.

    Wowser! You must have had some professional breeding experience here. I’ve seen $500 dollar koi before that can’t even compare to yours. I especially admire the orange/blk/white multi in the upper left part of the photo.

    You’re right about their appetites. Feeding time was always my favorite time of the day because they all came out of hiding and I was able to get the panoramic view!

    No personal breeding experience, but we have a friend who recently used to go shopping in Japan once a  year and we’d give him a shopping list.  We also adopted four large beauties from an older couple in our Koi club that were moving to a non-pond new house.  It didn’t really matter to them or us what value they might represent; it was all about a good home for the fish.  My guess is that those four fish were worth about $6k, but we don’t buy or sell fish, we just feed them and talk to them.

    The fish you pointed out is Yamanashi, named for one of the guys I worked with from Mitsui Bussan Aerospace in Tokyo who loved cold beer and Yakitori as much as I did.

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  13. Koi club and $1500 dollar fish! You are a pro and when we finish our new house upstate, you must give me advice about ponds; I’ll surely be asking because I am obviously an amateur.

    I enjoyed feeding and watching my gang as well; it was especially nice to have watched three generations grow and prosper although we had to give some away. Not enough space!

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  14. EThompson:
    Koi club and $1500 dollar fish! You are a pro and when we finish our new house upstate, you must give me advice about ponds; I’ll surely be asking because I am obviously an amateur.

    I enjoyed feeding and watching my gang as well; it was especially nice to have watched three generations grow and prosper although we had to give some away. Not enough space!

    I’d be happy to share what I’ve learned about Koi ponding, with you or any other Rats!  Over the last 17 years I’ve gradually migrated to the good hardware and reliably healthy water.  There are people in our club who are way more knowledgeable about the fish, and several are officially  Koi Health Advisors.

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  15. MJBubba:

    EThompson:
    $1500 dollar fish!

    Wow.   That sounds crazy to me.  In my pond they would get eaten on the first day, either by the heron or a great egret or one of the moccasins.

    I had huge problems with egrets as well; one ate my favorite so my next pond will be built under the screened lanai that provides both safety and the sun which koi enjoy as much as their owner!

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  16. EThompson:

    MJBubba:

    EThompson:
    $1500 dollar fish!

    Wow.   That sounds crazy to me.  In my pond they would get eaten on the first day, either by the heron or a great egret or one of the moccasins.

    I had huge problems with egrets as well; one ate my favorite so my next pond will be built under the screened lanai that provides both safety and the sun which koi enjoy as much as their owner!

    When we first started keeping fish, we bought smallish ones locally.  Perfect lunch-size for Herons!  It took a while for us to learn that the pond wasn’t deep enough, so I made changes.

    1. Enlarged the pond from 500 to 5,000 gallons, with most of it 5″ deep and with steep sides.
    2. Installed a heavy duty electric fence around the pond perimeter about 6″ above the ground.
    3. Fenced the yard perimeter.
    4. Located two motion-sensitive sprinklers directed at where the Raccoons hung out.
    5. Strung a few strands of strong fishing line horizontally about 8′ over the pond.
    6. Only bought larger fish, except for those born in the pond.
    7. Shot every squirrel, mouse and rat that dared to get within range with a high-powered pellet rifle.

    These changes defeated the Blue Herons because they walk into the pond to hopefully feed.  The combination of the fence and fishing lines makes it more difficult to enter our yard.  The electric wire would get them where no being likes being gotten, and if they managed to dodge the wire, the steep sides and depth prevents them from getting close enough to stab and eat the kids.  Great Blue Herons are stealthy and relentless to the nth power.

    The birds that dive to feed, like our local Osprey, are defeated by the fishing line.  Their eyesight is phenomenal and they avoid our yard.  Raccoons hate the sprinklers, so now avoid our yard entirely,  possibly also in response to Gwinneth’s full-throated barking.

    Now that the predators are under control, evidenced by the fact we’re lost zero fish in five years or so, all I keep in place is the yard perimeter fencing and the fishing line.  My video surveillance system shows that they don’t even try anymore, even when we’re gone.

    So, no nets or any such mechanical screening for us, as our goal has always been to keep the pond as natural looking as possible.  I have details on all of these items, as well as for the pond’s infrastructure.  I’d love to help anyone taking the time to read all this with ponding advice.

    Now, back to trip preparation; we have a Monday departure for the Newberry Volcano area in central Oregon.

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  17. Trinity Waters:

    EThompson:

    MJBubba:

    EThompson:
    $1500 dollar fish!

    Wow.   That sounds crazy to me.  In my pond they would get eaten on the first day, either by the heron or a great egret or one of the moccasins.

    I had huge problems with egrets as well; one ate my favorite so my next pond will be built under the screened lanai that provides both safety and the sun which koi enjoy as much as their owner!

    When we first started keeping fish, we bought smallish ones locally.  Perfect lunch-size for Herons!  It took a while for us to learn that the pond wasn’t deep enough, so I made changes.

    1. Enlarged the pond from 500 to 5,000 gallons, with most of it 5″ deep and with steep sides.
    2. Installed a heavy duty electric fence around the pond perimeter about 6″ above the ground.
    3. Fenced the yard perimeter.
    4. Located two motion-sensitive sprinklers directed at where the Raccoons hung out.
    5. Strung a few strands of strong fishing line horizontally about 8′ over the pond.
    6. Only bought larger fish, except for those born in the pond.
    7. Shot every squirrel, mouse and rat that dared to get within range with a high-powered pellet rifle.

    These changes defeated the Blue Herons because they walk into the pond to hopefully feed.  The combination of the fence and fishing lines makes it more difficult to enter our yard.  The electric wire would get them where no being likes being gotten, and if they managed to dodge the wire, the steep sides and depth prevents them from getting close enough to stab and eat the kids.  Great Blue Herons are stealthy and relentless to the nth power.

    The birds that dive to feed, like our local Osprey, are defeated by the fishing line.  Their eyesight is phenomenal and they avoid our yard.  Raccoons hate the sprinklers, so now avoid our yard entirely,  possibly also in response to Gwinneth’s full-throated barking.

    Now that the predators are under control, evidenced by the fact we’re lost zero fish in five years or so, all I keep in place is the yard perimeter fencing and the fishing line.  My video surveillance system shows that they don’t even try anymore, even when we’re gone.

    So, no nets or any such mechanical screening for us, as our goal has always been to keep the pond as natural looking as possible.  I have details on all of these items, as well as for the pond’s infrastructure.  I’d love to help anyone taking the time to read all this with ponding advice.

    Now, back to trip preparation; we have a Monday departure for the Newberry Volcano area in central Oregon.

    Oh no, I think I need to hire a separate contractor for the pond now. YOU are going to have to deal with my husband when he gets those bills. :))

    Have a great vacation and many thanks for all the helpful insight, you maniacal fish lover you.

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  18. EThompson:

    Trinity Waters:

    EThompson:

    MJBubba:

    EThompson:
    $1500 dollar fish!

    Wow.   That sounds crazy to me.  In my pond they would get eaten on the first day, either by the heron or a great egret or one of the moccasins.

    I had huge problems with egrets as well; one ate my favorite so my next pond will be built under the screened lanai that provides both safety and the sun which koi enjoy as much as their owner!

    When we first started keeping fish, we bought smallish ones locally.  Perfect lunch-size for Herons!  It took a while for us to learn that the pond wasn’t deep enough, so I made changes.

    1. Enlarged the pond from 500 to 5,000 gallons, with most of it 5″ deep and with steep sides.
    2. Installed a heavy duty electric fence around the pond perimeter about 6″ above the ground.
    3. Fenced the yard perimeter.
    4. Located two motion-sensitive sprinklers directed at where the Raccoons hung out.
    5. Strung a few strands of strong fishing line horizontally about 8′ over the pond.
    6. Only bought larger fish, except for those born in the pond.
    7. Shot every squirrel, mouse and rat that dared to get within range with a high-powered pellet rifle.

    These changes defeated the Blue Herons because they walk into the pond to hopefully feed.  The combination of the fence and fishing lines makes it more difficult to enter our yard.  The electric wire would get them where no being likes being gotten, and if they managed to dodge the wire, the steep sides and depth prevents them from getting close enough to stab and eat the kids.  Great Blue Herons are stealthy and relentless to the nth power.

    The birds that dive to feed, like our local Osprey, are defeated by the fishing line.  Their eyesight is phenomenal and they avoid our yard.  Raccoons hate the sprinklers, so now avoid our yard entirely,  possibly also in response to Gwinneth’s full-throated barking.

    Now that the predators are under control, evidenced by the fact we’re lost zero fish in five years or so, all I keep in place is the yard perimeter fencing and the fishing line.  My video surveillance system shows that they don’t even try anymore, even when we’re gone.

    So, no nets or any such mechanical screening for us, as our goal has always been to keep the pond as natural looking as possible.  I have details on all of these items, as well as for the pond’s infrastructure.  I’d love to help anyone taking the time to read all this with ponding advice.

    Now, back to trip preparation; we have a Monday departure for the Newberry Volcano area in central Oregon.

    Oh no, I think I need to hire a separate contractor for the pond now. YOU are going to have to deal with my husband when he gets those bills. :))

    Have a great vacation and many thanks for all the helpful insight, you maniacal fish lover you.

    Yeah, a pond is like a boat.  I spent over $4k just this year on the “last” improvement…

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  19. Trinity Waters:
    Yeah, a pond is like a boat.  I spent over $4k just this year on the “last” improvement…

    You make me giggle. I always enjoy people who spend ridiculous amounts of money on anything other than houses. You totally rationalize my expenditures on Prada shoes. :))

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  20. EThompson:

    OmegaPaladin:
    I appreciate your aggressive, relentless debating style EThompson.   I can definitely see why you went for Trump – he takes on his enemies in a similar fashion.

    He doesn’t simply take on his enemies in that manner; that is how he lives his life. But you apparently don’t know this so take some advice and pick up a few books on the Donald written by some pretty legitimate insiders including Gingrich, Kessler, and Stone.

    I have 5 recommendations if you care to read them.

    Interesting.

    I was thinking of picking up Conrad Black’s A President Like No Other, as I really like his writing style.  Is that one of them?  Black is one of the few Trump supporters on the National Review – apparently they have not kicked him out along with VDH.

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