22 thoughts on “Koi, redux”

  1. EThompson:
    one looks like a pheasant

    Hi E,

    There’s this thing; it’s called sexual dimorphism. See the green head on the critter on the right? That’s Papa. See the mousy, fade-into-the-background look of the critter on the left? That’s Mama Mallard.

    This was educational for me: to realize that mallards are on the West Coast, also.

    Sometimes we are lucky enough to have a mating pair in the stream that runs through our pastures in NY. But it happens that foxes or coyotes destroy them. So when we see a pair, we think hello, welcome,  and we  wish them well.

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  2. I have a bird sanctuary in my backyard and my cardinal males are bright red and their mates are grey so I understand of what you speak. It’s Nature’s way of protecting the nest!

    The female mallard in TW’s picture looked so fluffy I assumed she might be a pheasant. 🙂

  3. jzdro:
    There’s this thing; it’s called sexual dimorphism.

    And baby ducks look all alike until they get older.  Then they start to manifest the characteristics of their sex.  Whether they have green heads or are mousy brown has nothing to do with what “gender” they are “assigned” at hatching.  If you try to ask them for their preferred pronoun, they’ll say you’re a “quack”.

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  4. John Walker:

    jzdro:
    There’s this thing; it’s called sexual dimorphism.

    And baby ducks look all alike until they get older.  Then they start to manifest the characteristics of their sex.  Whether they have green heads or are mousy brown has nothing to do with what “gender” they are “assigned” at hatching.  If you try to ask them for their preferred pronoun, they’ll say you’re a “quack”.

    I’ve noticed something similar with the goldfish that spawn in my pond, not exactly with the gender, but with the coloration, they are always black until they reach a certain size, then the black coloration gradually turns into variations of color. Like the baby ducks, a bland coloration may be nature’s way of protecting them until they are older and more of a challenge to make a meal of.

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  5. EThompson:
    I have a bird sanctuary in my backyard and my cardinal males are bright red and their mates are grey so I understand of what you speak. It’s Nature’s way of protecting the nest!

    The female mallard in TW’s picture looked so fluffy I assumed she might be a pheasant. 🙂

    I dunno, she may have her feathers fluffed out because she may be sitting on a brood.

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  6. EThompson:
    I don’t think they’re both ducks? I’m less than an expert, but one looks like a pheasant.

    BTW, is that bougainvillea to the left?

    Male and female Mallards.  Those plants, one adjacent to each skimmer, are flowering Razzleberries; don’t recall the Latin name.

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  7. Gerry D:

    EThompson:
    I have a bird sanctuary in my backyard and my cardinal males are bright red and their mates are grey so I understand of what you speak. It’s Nature’s way of protecting the nest!

    The female mallard in TW’s picture looked so fluffy I assumed she might be a pheasant. 🙂

    I dunno, she may have her feathers fluffed out because she may be sitting on a brood.

    She’s rearranging her feathers after a full Monty bath in my pond.

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  8. Gerry D:
    I’ve noticed something similar with the goldfish that spawn in my pond, not exactly with the gender, but with the coloration, they are always black until they reach a certain size, then the black coloration gradually turns into variations of color.

    Same here and in the early stages they are virtually invisible. Suddenly I peer into the pond and I notice an entirely new school of goldfish. Fish are really entertaining to watch and at the risk of sounding crazier than I normally do (robbing you of a joke there, Dime) koi in particular really do have individual personalities- aggressive, loners, exhibitionists, etc. 🙂

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