A Fascinating, Philosophic Review of “Ready Player One”

Agree, disagree or a mixture of both, this review is deep and intense: Ready Player One: A Study in Generational Media Colonization.

Every once in awhile, a film or another piece of media stumbles across the popular psyche, one that has the capacity to reveal what is truly going on under the surface of the cultural zeitgeist. In this piece, I will not attempt to do a thorough regurgitation of Ready Player One, the latest Spielberg Hollywood CGI-monstrosity of grand escapism, and a PG-13 fun-for-the-whole-family epic. Spielberg has become the mainstay director of Hollywood. His formulaic style is the apotheosis of current culture industry standards, so you can guess as to how the plot of RP1 moves along. Instead, this review will highlight several key themes, both latent and manifest, and conclude that, as a piece of Postmodern media, RP1 encapsulates where our culture is, and where our culture in the West is heading. RP1 is especially important in terms of capturing our unique generational moment: the twilight between our Western world being dominated by the influence of from the Boomers to the influence of Millennials.

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5 thoughts on “A Fascinating, Philosophic Review of “Ready Player One””

  1. Interesting to meet someone else who examines the gestalt of a film.

    However, before I can commit to watching any film, there is a question I need answered: is there  serious character development or not?. (Or at least interesting and humane characters?)

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  2. This essay is probably meaningful in its analysis and pessimism, but I can’t be sure. It was intellectually dense to the point of impenetrability. The writing might have been more scrutable were it less (self-consciously, I think) clever. I kept getting the image of a cat either playing endlessly with a yarn ball with the smooth coordination of which only a cat is capable, or else the same cat toying with a mouse for way too long before the coup-de-grace. While reading, I really, really wanted the words to stop what felt like chiropractic pressure on my mind. The clouds parted somewhat in the last few paragraphs, where the author reached the nadir which matches my own assessment of our so-called culture and its bleak future.

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  3. civil westman:
    This essay is probably meaningful in its analysis and pessimism, but I can’t be sure. It was intellectually dense to the point of impenetrability. The writing might have been more scrutable were it less (self-consciously, I think) clever. I kept getting the image of a cat either playing endlessly with a yarn ball with the smooth coordination of which only a cat is capable, or else the same cat toying with a mouse for way too long before the coup-de-grace. While reading, I really, really wanted the words to stop what felt like chiropractic pressure on my mind. The clouds parted somewhat in the last few paragraphs, where the author reached the nadir which matches my own assessment of our so-called culture and its bleak future.

    But it is possible that you and all other readers were warned about the coming chiropractic pressure. After all, the title was “Generational Media Colonization,” which suggests that there will be continual attempts to multi-syllabatize any thought content.

    I mean why make a simple comprhensible statement when one can be oblique?

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  4. Carol Sterritt:
    civil westman: This essay is probably meaningful in its analysis and pessimism, but I can’t be sure. It was intellectually dense to the point of impenetrability. The writing might have been more scrutable were it less (self-consciously, I think) clever. I kept getting the image of a cat either playing endlessly with a yarn ball with the smooth coordination of which only a cat is capable, or else the same cat toying with a mouse for way too long before the coup-de-grace. While reading, I really, really wanted the words to stop what felt like chiropractic pressure on my mind. The clouds parted somewhat in the last few paragraphs, where the author reached the nadir which matches my own assessment of our so-called culture and its bleak future. But it is possible that you and all other readers were warned about the coming chiropractic pressure. After all, the title was “Generational Media Colonization,” which suggests that there will be continual attempts to multi-syllabatize any thought content. I mean why make a simple comprhensible statement when one can be oblique?

    Yes, it was looonnng. I thought it was pretty fascinating though. Man, Boomers sure catch a lot of flak these days.

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  5. Neovictorian:

    Carol Sterritt:
    civil westman: This essay is probably meaningful in its analysis and pessimism, but I can’t be sure. It was intellectually dense to the point of impenetrability. The writing might have been more scrutable were it less (self-consciously, I think) clever. I kept getting the image of a cat either playing endlessly with a yarn ball with the smooth coordination of which only a cat is capable, or else the same cat toying with a mouse for way too long before the coup-de-grace. While reading, I really, really wanted the words to stop what felt like chiropractic pressure on my mind. The clouds parted somewhat in the last few paragraphs, where the author reached the nadir which matches my own assessment of our so-called culture and its bleak future. But it is possible that you and all other readers were warned about the coming chiropractic pressure. After all, the title was “Generational Media Colonization,” which suggests that there will be continual attempts to multi-syllabatize any thought content. I mean why make a simple comprehensible statement when one can be oblique?

    Yes, it was looonnng. I thought it was pretty fascinating though. Man, Boomers sure catch a lot of flak these days.

    Well we are old and grumpy and sometimes rather “Get off my damn lawn, you anarchist Anti Fa soy eaters! And get a job while you’ re at it.” So there is that.

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