28 thoughts on “Hurricane Florence”

  1. 10 Cents:
    I think Member Poison Prawn is in the area.

    I was in Myrtle Beach last Tuesday-Saturday.  The weather was great.  I assume that the hotel I was staying at has been evacuated since it’s about 100 feet from the Atlantic.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  2. We are in Raleigh, but my husband’s family is in Jacksonville (about an hour north of Wilmington). Have many friends that live at the beach or have places there. Most have evacuated. A few have stayed. With the more southward turn, we aren’t going to get as much wind here as we thought initially, but it still won’t be fun for a few days. This thing is just moving too slow. There are several people over at the other place in the path of the storm. Not sure how many are here. I can’t keep track. 🙂

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  3. It amazes me that I have all the information I need in my cell phone. No need for a radio or TV. We get such good weather information now.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  4. 10 Cents:
    It amazes me that I have all the information I need in my cell phone. No need for a radio or TV. We get such good weather information now.

    Back in the late 90s, I drove home from SC to VA through a hurricane with no doors or windows on my Jeep because I had no idea it was coming. It had been a sunny weekend at Myrtle Beach so I left the doors at home. Spent most of the trip squeegeeing the inside of the windshield to see

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  5. I am in Summerville SC about 35 miles west of Charleston. Looks like we will get lots of rain Saturday and Sunday but should be just a tropical storm by then. Many of my neighbors evacuated. My major concern is if and for how long the power is absent. I sold my house on Bald Head Island at the mouth of the Cape River in May. Now the new owner can worry about it.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  6. PhCheese:
    I sold my house on Bald Head Island at the mouth of the Cape River in May. Now the new owner can worry about it.

    Boy, aren’t you glad not to have to worry about that. I know a couple who has 3 nice rentals on The Point at Emerald Isle, NC. When he left yesterday, he didn’t expect to have anything to come back to. Now that it’s weaken some, I’m hoping for the best for them.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  7. PhCheese:
    I am in Summerville SC about 35 miles west of Charleston. Looks like we will get lots of rain Saturday and Sunday but should be just a tropical storm by then. Many of my neighbors evacuated. My major concern is if and for how long the power is absent. I sold my house on Bald Head Island at the mouth of the Cape River in May. Now the new owner can worry about it.

    I think I read a wry grin in this comment, PhCheese.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  8. The Sinistral Bassist:

    10 Cents:
    It amazes me that I have all the information I need in my cell phone. No need for a radio or TV. We get such good weather information now.

    Back in the late 90s, I drove home from SC to VA through a hurricane with no doors or windows on my Jeep because I had no idea it was coming. It had been a sunny weekend at Myrtle Beach so I left the doors at home. Spent most of the trip squeegeeing the inside of the windshield to see

    I am glad you didn’t die. I am being serious. It is so easy to get into unforeseen situations and get stuck. I heard that most people die in hurricanes in cars.

    I shudder at the stupid things I did in my youth. I drove when I should have got a room. Being sleepy behind a wheel at 2 am is not very bright but it seemed not so bad at the time. Hey, I saved money!

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  9. The cone of the hurricane includes Savannah, GA so people in No FL are slightly on edge (as all Floridians are this time of year). We’re in the process of building a home in the Jacksonville area and have been calling our contractor once a day. So far so good for that part of the country.

    Unfortunately, my cousin, her husband and her brood of 6 live in Raleigh along with my 90 yr old aunt. Fortunately they’re long gone and evacuated to Nashville where a large portion of our family lives.

    I’ve been thinking of our old pal from R- Charlotte- who lives in D.C. Anyone hear from her?

  10. Blondie:
    Boy, aren’t you glad not to have to worry about that. I know a couple who has 3 nice rentals on The Point at Emerald Isle, NC. When he left yesterday, he didn’t expect to have anything to come back to.

    10 Cents:

    The Sinistral Bassist: Back in the late 90s, I drove home from SC to VA through a hurricane with no doors or windows on my Jeep because I had no idea it was coming. It had been a sunny weekend at Myrtle Beach so I left the doors at home. Spent most of the trip squeegeeing the inside of the windshield to see

    I am glad you didn’t die. I am being serious. It is so easy to get into unforeseen situations and get stuck. I heard that most people die in hurricanes in cars.

    Tropical storms and hurricanes are not the equivalent of atom bombs. Except under very limited conditions (and generally within 1000 yards of the coast) they are not going to scour everything down to the dirt line. It might cause flooding, but even there it is unusual (except on the coast) to get more than one or two feet of water.

    In most cases, if your house is over 20 feet above sea level you are safer staying at home with a Cat 1 or 2 storm than evacuating. In all cases if it is 35 feet above sea level, you should stay put.  Even if your house starts flooding. Even 3 feet of water is just a nuisance compared to the risk of evacuating when the storm is still going on. (Basically because the roads you take could be as much as 10-15 under water at points.)

    Remember that picture of the assisted living center in Dickinson during Harvey? Those folks were uncomfortable, but safe, even sitting in water up to their knees.  (The water was warm enough that hypothermia was not a risk.) They were evacuated later that day.

    Last year, the main reason Janet and I evacuated for Harvey was not the fear my house would flood. (It did not.) It was because we knew we would be cut off from M.D. Anderson medical center if we stayed south of Clear Creek. (As it was we were cut off anyway due to flooding around M. D. Anderson. The Bayou City became the Moat City.)

    Main thing about hurricanes is be prepared, have a plan and stick to the plan. The best advice is run from the water and hide from the wind. Evacuate if the storm surge is likely to put you under water, but shelter in place if you have a sturdy home (not a mobile home) that will be above the storm surge line. Unless a tornado hits you your building will be intact – and a hurricane-spawned tornado is as likely to hit you in Austin, TX as in Galveston, TX.

    And don’t buy into the Worst. Storm. EVAH!!!! hype you hear on broadcast news.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  11. Seawriter:
    In most cases, if your house is over 20 feet above sea level you are safer staying at home with a Cat 1 or 2 storm than evacuating. In all cases if it is 35 feet above sea level, you should stay put.

    I completely agree with this advice. I have never evacuated and one of the reasons why is that I can immediately assess the damage and be first in line to get my lawn and maintenance crew over to start fixing the mess. I was staying with my parents during Irma because they live on the 15th floor of a high rise nearby and the day after I was wading through 2 feet of water to get back to my house; others, who had evacuated were not able to get home for two weeks and are still waiting for repairs.

  12. 10 Cents:

    PhCheese:
    I am in Summerville SC about 35 miles west of Charleston. Looks like we will get lots of rain Saturday and Sunday but should be just a tropical storm by then. Many of my neighbors evacuated. My major concern is if and for how long the power is absent. I sold my house on Bald Head Island at the mouth of the Cape River in May. Now the new owner can worry about it.

    I think I read a wry grin in this comment, PhCheese.

    It was a rye grin when I was a drinking man.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  13. EThompson:

    Seawriter:
    In most cases, if your house is over 20 feet above sea level you are safer staying at home with a Cat 1 or 2 storm than evacuating. In all cases if it is 35 feet above sea level, you should stay put.

    I completely agree with this advice. I have never evacuated and one of the reasons why is that I can immediately assess the damage and be first in line to get my lawn and maintenance crew over to start fixing the mess. I was staying with my parents during Irma because they live on the 15th floor of a high rise nearby and the day after I was wading through 2 feet of water to get back to my house; others, who had evacuated were not able to get home for two weeks and are still waiting for repairs.

    Just for reference, the guy with the rentals I was referencing is right on the beach. Not a good place to be even in a Cat 2.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  14. Blondie:

    PhCheese:
    I sold my house on Bald Head Island at the mouth of the Cape River in May. Now the new owner can worry about it.

    Boy, aren’t you glad not to have to worry about that. I know a couple who has 3 nice rentals on The Point at Emerald Isle, NC. When he left yesterday, he didn’t expect to have anything to come back to. Now that it’s weaken some, I’m hoping for the best for them.

    Blondie:

    PhCheese:
    I sold my house on Bald Head Island at the mouth of the Cape River in May. Now the new owner can worry about it.

    Boy, aren’t you glad not to have to worry about that. I know a couple who has 3 nice rentals on The Point at Emerald Isle, NC. When he left yesterday, he didn’t expect to have anything to come back to. Now that it’s weaken some, I’m hoping for the best for them.

    Blondie:

    PhCheese:
    I sold my house on Bald Head Island at the mouth of the Cape River in May. Now the new owner can worry about it.

    Boy, aren’t you glad not to have to worry about that. I know a couple who has 3 nice rentals on The Point at Emerald Isle, NC. When he left yesterday, he didn’t expect to have anything to come back to. Now that it’s weaken some, I’m hoping for the best for them.

    I kissed a couple of boats goodbye while I lived on BHI only to be pleasantly surprised. With all the storms (6/8) never filed an insurance claim.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  15. PhCheese:

    10 Cents:

    PhCheese:
    I am in Summerville SC about 35 miles west of Charleston. Looks like we will get lots of rain Saturday and Sunday but should be just a tropical storm by then. Many of my neighbors evacuated. My major concern is if and for how long the power is absent. I sold my house on Bald Head Island at the mouth of the Cape River in May. Now the new owner can worry about it.

    I think I read a wry grin in this comment, PhCheese.

    It was a rye grin when I was a drinking man.

    I took you as a person never to go against the grain, Ph. What happened?

  16. Blondie:
    Just for reference, the guy with the rentals I was referencing is right on the beach. Not a good place to be even in a Cat 2.

    Agree. We have always lived slightly inland from the beach because frankly, the wind and flood insurance are astronomically expensive. My parents lived right on the beach but they were on a high floor with fortified windows.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar

Leave a Reply