The Big Myth: Wage Gaps

On CNBC this afternoon, I was listening to Suze Orman talk about the wage gap between men and women. Although she admits that the economy is on fire, she continues to whine about the 20% gap between male and female wages.

Sigh. Y’all have no idea how weary am I to hear this non-truth again and again especially from an economically savvy woman such as Orman.

Here are the facts:

I made more than most men in my corporate environment because I had a husband who traveled 200 days a year and had no children. I worked 60-70 hours a week and that was rewarded. Other women don’t always have that option and should never be criticized for their choices. They also shouldn’t expect to make as much as the individual who works longer hours.

My favorite example is Carly Fiorina who shares three children with her equally successful husband. When she was offered the CEO position at HP she and her husband decided he should retire to run the household so she could devote herself to her new position. She wasn’t as successful at HP as I would have liked, but I respect the decision that she and her spouse made.  She realized that one individual can’t always “have it all” and sacrifices from one partner need to be made if you choose to have a family.


Users who have liked this post:

  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar

26 thoughts on “The Big Myth: Wage Gaps”

  1. Since we share a common name (mine is a middle – grandmother’s maiden name), I’m curious what you and other male members think on this subject. And if any women on this site feel they were discriminated against in terms of salary, I’d be more than interested to hear the gory details.

  2. I do like this post and I think it accurately describes one, and perhaps the biggest,  factor affecting the differences in earnings between men and women.

    I have two daughters. One, who has been a predominantly stay-at-home mom whose husband works frequently long hours outside the home in his own small business, has 3 children. The other one, works way more than what we consider full-time and earns more than I ever imagined that I myself could earn, has 4 children and a husband who handles much of the domestic activity, much of that under her supervision since she works from home.

    The first one, when she goes to work again, will not likely approach her sister in earnings power. Of course, time in the work force as a wage earner is not the only differing factor between my daughters in this example.

    You can observe a lot just by watching.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  3. In my recent job hunt, I felt discrimination every time I had to say I was a a white male. I know that checks no diversity boxes and thus counts against me. I cannot imagine what it is like to be part of a grievance group.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  4. It’s hard to believe the wage gap thing is still alive in the face of the facts. This just goes to show that facts don’t really matter in the political arena, which is why Scott Adams titled his most recent book Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter. It’s an interesting read, btw.

    You can’t count on much these days but you can count on the wage gap myth to continue to be repeated, and not only by the Left.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  5. Bob Thompson:
    Of course, time in the work force as a wage earner is not the only differing factor between my daughters in this example.

    Time spent in the work force must be productive and create donuts for the company. I had a good friend who worked far longer hours than I and was fired because she didn’t make the P&L goals.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  6. Bryan G. Stephens:
    In my recent job hunt, I felt discrimination every time I had to say I was a a white male. I know that checks no diversity boxes and thus counts against me. I cannot imagine what it is like to be part of a grievance group.

    I shouldn’t laugh because this is not funny but I encountered discrimination 20 years ago interviewing in NYC because I was from the Midwest and looked like it.

    Thank goodness my new boss appreciated my initiative but I did have to change my look and believe me, that was all for the best!

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  7. EThompson:

    Bryan G. Stephens:
    In my recent job hunt, I felt discrimination every time I had to say I was a a white male. I know that checks no diversity boxes and thus counts against me. I cannot imagine what it is like to be part of a grievance group.

    I shouldn’t laugh because this is not funny but I encountered discrimination 20 years ago interviewing in NYC because I was from the Midwest and looked like it.

    Thank goodness my new boss appreciated my initiative but I did have to change my look and believe me, that was all for the best!

    Appearance can count for or against. I worked in settings that required much dealing with the public, regular customers and walk-ins, as well as in ‘backroom operations’ where there was no person interaction except with other employees, and finally where there was not random contact but regular meetings with clients, and each these present potential employees with varying criteria regarding how they appear to others.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  8. Not entering the debate, but the talk about appearance reminded me of one of the best-remembered sentences one can find in *Walden* : “I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.” 😉

  9. EThompson:
    I shouldn’t laugh because this is not funny but I encountered discrimination 20 years ago interviewing in NYC because I was from the Midwest and looked like it.

    I’m not seeing why that would be a cause for discrimination against you. I’d think the Midwest look is wholesome and trustworthy. Seems like a good thing.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  10. Bob Thompson:

    EThompson:

    Bryan G. Stephens:
    In my recent job hunt, I felt discrimination every time I had to say I was a a white male. I know that checks no diversity boxes and thus counts against me. I cannot imagine what it is like to be part of a grievance group.

    I shouldn’t laugh because this is not funny but I encountered discrimination 20 years ago interviewing in NYC because I was from the Midwest and looked like it.

    Thank goodness my new boss appreciated my initiative but I did have to change my look and believe me, that was all for the best!

    Appearance can count for or against. I worked in settings that required much dealing with the public, regular customers and walk-ins, as well as in ‘backroom operations’ where there was no person interaction except with other employees, and finally where there was not random contact but regular meetings with clients, and each these present potential employees with varying criteria regarding how they appear to others.

    Because Halloween is my favorite holiday, I enjoyed wearing the NYC corporate costume- little black dress, pearls and stilettos and perfectly colored long blonde hair.

    I’m probably the only woman in America who actually enjoyed the wolf whistles from a construction site directly in front of my office. 🙂

    My last corporate event in NYC was a formal dinner sponsored by my company Saks Fifth Avenue and I was seated next to Armani and Dolce & Gabbana. I blew $8k on a Vera Wang gown and shoes and have never regretted it. I rocked it and had the time of my life.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  11. drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    I shouldn’t laugh because this is not funny but I encountered discrimination 20 years ago interviewing in NYC because I was from the Midwest and looked like it.

    I’m not seeing why that would be a cause for discrimination against you. I’d think the Midwest look is wholesome and trustworthy. Seems like a good thing.

    I’m almost ashamed to ask, but what does the “Midwest look” look like ?

  12. Blumroch:
    Not entering the debate, but the talk about appearance reminded me of one of the best-remembered sentences one can find in *Walden* : “I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.” 😉

    I think you should enter the debate because I need to convince you to appreciate the feminine sex in your pays. I revere Parisian women.

  13. Blumroch:

    drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    I shouldn’t laugh because this is not funny but I encountered discrimination 20 years ago interviewing in NYC because I was from the Midwest and looked like it.

    I’m not seeing why that would be a cause for discrimination against you. I’d think the Midwest look is wholesome and trustworthy. Seems like a good thing.

    I’m almost ashamed to ask, but what does the “Midwest look” look like ?

    I wore brown suits. Enough said.

  14. EThompson:

    I think you should enter the debate because I need to convince you to appreciate the feminine sex in your pays. I revere Parisian women.

    You do not have to convince me to appreciate the best and prettiest half of mankind. As one French poet said : “I’m so in love with women that if I were one, I would not like men”. 😉

    The amusing thing is that in my years of youth, I had very feminine and exquisite young women at my arm (even a real princess, eh eh), while being myself just very average. The power of brains, I guess. 😉

    As for fashion, from what I sometimes see in magazines, the old Dior French touch belongs to the past. Now, I don’t like things post 1960s. 😉 The same applies to actresses : I’ve yet to see a modern one approaching in beauty an Ava, a Liz or a Gene.

    But this is completely off-topic. 😉

  15. EThompson:

    I wore brown suits. Enough said.

    I would not dare to be inquisitive about yourself. I was just wondering what this look was like. I tried “midwest look” with ixquick images search, and this does not return anything significant.

    T’was mere and unessential curiosity. Next topic. 😉

  16. EThompson:

    Bob Thompson:

    EThompson:

    Bryan G. Stephens:
    In my recent job hunt, I felt discrimination every time I had to say I was a a white male. I know that checks no diversity boxes and thus counts against me. I cannot imagine what it is like to be part of a grievance group.

    I shouldn’t laugh because this is not funny but I encountered discrimination 20 years ago interviewing in NYC because I was from the Midwest and looked like it.

    Thank goodness my new boss appreciated my initiative but I did have to change my look and believe me, that was all for the best!

    Appearance can count for or against. I worked in settings that required much dealing with the public, regular customers and walk-ins, as well as in ‘backroom operations’ where there was no person interaction except with other employees, and finally where there was not random contact but regular meetings with clients, and each these present potential employees with varying criteria regarding how they appear to others.

    Also, because Halloween is my favorite holiday, I enjoyed wearing the NYC corporate costume- little black dress, pearls and stilettos and perfectly colored long blonde hair.

    I’m probably the only woman in America who actually enjoyed the wolf whistles from a construction site directly in front of my office. 🙂

    My last corporate event in NYC was a formal dinner sponsored by my company Saks Fifth Avenue and I was seated next to Armani and Dolce & Gabbana. I blew $8k on a Vera Wang gown and shoes and have never regretted it. I rocked it and had the time of my life.

    I see this in my hard-working and successful business-oriented daughter. Compliments on appearance are routine and nice for her but elicit nothing special in response as the preferred compliments  on her mental and business acumen do.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  17. @EThompson : It is not. In terms of true beauty and style, Catherine Deneuve has no rival.

    I cannot agree with you here, but I won’t try to change your mind. *De gustibus et coloribus*… etc. 😉 Deneuve is not even a decent actress, contrarily to the three I mentionned, who have been good and even great at times. For Ava Gardner, try and see *Pandora* and *The barefoot Contessa*, if you do not know them already.

  18. Bob Thompson:
    I see this in my hard-working and successful business-oriented daughter. Compliments on appearance are routine and nice for her but elicit nothing special in response as the preferred compliments  on her mental and business acumen do.

    Bob, I worked for the infamous Rose Marie Bravo and had to pay attention to both the bottom line and look chic while doing so. I’m not complaining about this btw; I had a blast and I will always be grateful for such a fabulous opportunity.

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  19. Blumroch:
    @EThompson : It is not. In terms of true beauty and style, Catherine Deneuve has no rival.

    I cannot agree with you here, but I won’t try to change your mind. *De gustibus et coloribus*… etc. 😉 Deneuve is not even a decent actress, contrarily to the three I mentionned, who have been good and even great at times.

    Both my husband and I am shocked at this blaspheme.

  20. EThompson:

    Blumroch:
    @EThompson : It is not. In terms of true beauty and style, Catherine Deneuve has no rival.

    I cannot agree with you here, but I won’t try to change your mind. *De gustibus et coloribus*… etc. 😉 Deneuve is not even a decent actress, contrarily to the three I mentionned, who have been good and even great at times.

    Both my husband and I am shocked at this blaspheme.

    Your husband has good taste, for he married *you* and *not* Deneuve ! 😉

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  21. Blumroch:

    EThompson:

    Blumroch:
    @EThompson : It is not. In terms of true beauty and style, Catherine Deneuve has no rival.

    I cannot agree with you here, but I won’t try to change your mind. *De gustibus et coloribus*… etc. 😉 Deneuve is not even a decent actress, contrarily to the three I mentionned, who have been good and even great at times.

    Both my husband and I am shocked at this blaspheme.

    Your husband has good taste, for he married *you* and *not* Deneuve ! 😉

    Surely we can agree on my second favorite icon of style and beauty:

    Image result for pics of grace kelly

    And perhaps:

    Image result for picture of audrey hepburn breakfast at tiffany's

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  22. @EThompson : “Surely we can agree on my second favorite icon of style and beauty:” (Grace Kelly, Audrey Hepburn) :

    Pretty women indeed, no one will deny it, but still no comparison with the three I mentionned. 😉 I’ll admit they were better actresses than Deneuve ever was. 😉 Ah, for Gene Tierney, may I suggest *Heaven can wait*, one of the best films by Lubitsch, and *The Shanghai Gesture* directed by von Sternberg ? American screens have never been so enlightening. 😉

Leave a Reply