20 thoughts on “Photo Friday: 18-9-21”

  1. Lignières: Hôtel de Commune

    The building at the centre of this photo is the original Hôtel de Commune (town hall) of Lignières, around 10 minutes’ walk from my house.  It was built in 1730 and escaped the fire of 1832, which destroyed much of the village.  The building at the right, originally the village school, was built between 1835 and 1837 and is the present-day Hôtel de Commune, with the original building now a café-restaurant.

    The “then” photo is from a postcard mailed in 1911, featuring Toby, the Vigilant Village Dog, who no longer checks people’s papers when they enter the town.  I took the “now” photo in 2007.  One of the slit windows in the clock tower looks out from a prison cell with a steel door which still exists.

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  2. John Walker:
    Lignières: Hôtel de Commune

    The building at the centre of this photo is the original Hôtel de Commune (town hall) of Lignières, around 10 minutes’ walk from my house.  It was built in 1730 and escaped the fire of 1832, which destroyed much of the village.  The building at the right, originally the village school, was built between 1835 and 1837 and is the present-day Hôtel de Commune, with the original building now a café-restaurant.

    The “then” photo is from a postcard mailed in 1911, featuring Toby, the Vigilant Village Dog, who no longer checks people’s papers when they enter the town.  I took the “now” photo in 2007.  One of the slit windows in the clock tower looks out from a prison cell with a steel door which still exists.

    Nice photo.

    Did the clock chime? That would not be nice for the prisoner trying to get some sleep.

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  3. 10 Cents:
    Did the clock chime? That would not be nice for the prisoner trying to get some sleep.

    Yes, the clock chimes on the hour and half hour.  As it happens, it recently broke and was just repaired.  Next Tuesday we’re having a dinner for those who contributed to the restoration in the restaurant in the building.

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  4. 1777 map of the Lake Champlain fort formerly known as Carillon:

     

    The fort today, owned by a private group because Columbia University rejected the offer of the title deed, happily:

     

    The only image I can find online of a postcard on sale at the gift shop one time. The defects are nothing when the coolness is considered:

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  5. I don’t know New York geography so I had look up where the fort was generally, jzdro. I have always heard of Fort Ticonderoga (Carillon) but now I know where it is. (Red circle area.)

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  6. It was a chokepoint on the route between Montreal and Albany. (The Richelieu River flows north out of Lake Champlain to the St. Lawrence River.) When by 1754 the French and their Indian allies were at war with the English and their allies, think how the English, and especially the English colonials living out in the woods, were hemmed in.

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  7. 10 Cents:
    Did the clock chime?

    Here is a picture of the clock mechanism, as restored.  As you can see from the nameplate, the clock is not that old, having been manufactured in 1924.  As a clock appears in the “then” picture, from a postcard mailed in 1911, this mechanism must have replaced the clock in that picture.  The dial on the clock mechanism mirrors the one on the outside of the tower, allowing the clock to be set without somebody observing it from outside.

    Horloge:   Hôtel de Commune, Lignières

    Here is a picture of the workshop in which the clock was made.  Note the central power and belt distribution for the machine tools.  This was common in the steam era, but by the 1920s an electric motor may have replaced the steam engine.

    Fabrication: Horloge de  Hôtel de Commune, Lignières

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  8. A: Why is the jail cell in the clock tower?

    B: It was the best way for the prisoner to serve their time.

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  9. 10 Cents:
    A: Why is the jail cell in the clock tower?

    B: It was the best way for the prisoner to serve their time.

    May I say that with *time* in italics, you don’t give enough credit to your readers ? 😉

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  10. Blumroch:

    10 Cents:
    A: Why is the jail cell in the clock tower?

    B: It was the best way for the prisoner to serve their time.

    May I say that with *time* in italics, you don’t give enough credit to your readers ? 😉

    No.

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  11. 10 Cents:
    A: Why is the jail cell in the clock tower?

    Dunno; seems risky. A prisoner might feel inspired to become a Tempus Fugitive.

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  12. jzdro:

    10 Cents:
    A: Why is the jail cell in the clock tower?

    Dunno; seems risky. A prisoner might feel inspired to become a Tempus Fugitive.

    This all happened from a mistranslation from Blumroch and poor eyesight. .  How hard is it to get “prisoner in the dock” right?

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  13. 10 Cents:

    jzdro:

    10 Cents:
    A: Why is the jail cell in the clock tower?

    Dunno; seems risky. A prisoner might feel inspired to become a Tempus Fugitive.

    This all happened from a mistranslation from Blumroch and poor eyesight. .  How hard is it to get “prisoner in the dock” right?

    I tried to make a kerning joke. I can see where “cl” can be mistaken for “d” but going the other way is less likely. There are many jokes on the Internet where ” cl ” becoming “d” is very inappropriate.

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