Wednesday Sports: 2018-10-3 Doping

When I grew up I just took it for granted that athletes trained hard and didn’t dope. Now I don’t think that way. There are just too many ways to get an edge through chemicals. When you want to win at any cost how do say no to ways to win?

The questions are:

  • What percentage of athletes now dope? Why do you think that number is correct?
  • Is doping wrong or just part of modern training?
  • Which athlete shocked you the most by owning up to their doping?
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12 thoughts on “Wednesday Sports: 2018-10-3 Doping”

  1. I used to do a lot of cycling with my son and the Tour de France was an annual high point for both of us.  We watched with dismay at some of the revelations about doping among the riders, but when Lance Armstrong was ‘outed’, that was it for us.  I haven’t watched since then, so I guess he was the most shocking.

    I don’t think doping should be allowed, but other techniques used for cycling are more questionable.  Is using a hypobaric chamber OK?  if not, what about training at high altitudes?  Its all part of the same slope.

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  2. WillowSpring:
    We watched with dismay at some of the revelations about doping among the riders, but when Lance Armstrong was ‘outed’, that was it for us.  I haven’t watched since then, so I guess he was the most shocking.

    Agree. I will never watch that event again; I now know how “Black Sox” fans felt after Shoeless Joe Jackson and some of his compadres threw the 1919 World Series.

    Also, and more importantly, steroids are dangerous for the athlete physically and psychologically.

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  3. I wanted to believe Lance Armstrong. How could he get away with it, so he must have been clean.

    It is hard to enjoy sports as much as I once did because I doubt the athletes. Part of the joy was the dream that anyone could be at the level if they worked hard. Now, I think what drug regimen are they on. Are they really winners or cheaters?

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  4. EThompson:

    WillowSpring:
    We watched with dismay at some of the revelations about doping among the riders, but when Lance Armstrong was ‘outed’, that was it for us.  I haven’t watched since then, so I guess he was the most shocking.

    Agree. I will never watch that event again; I now know how “Black Sox” fans felt after Shoeless Joe Jackson and some of his compadres threw the 1919 World Series.

    Also, and more importantly, steroids are dangerous for the athlete physically and psychologically.

    Shoeless Joe was not part of that conspiracy. There has never been adequate proof that he had anything to do with it, and when you look at his stats for that series, it’s very difficult to say that he was throwing anything.

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  5. It’s hard to think gauge the doping in sports question. People like to say that “oh, all football players are doping.” But I don’t think that is correct based on the effects doping has on the body; it breaks it down faster. But I think that is only true of certain types of steroids. Plus I think the NFL has one of the more stringent drug testing regimes in all of the major sports. I know people are still concerned about “doping” in baseball, to which my solution would be for baseball to treat like they did gambling in the previous era. If doping is a threat to the integrity of the game like gambling was said to be, then you need to ban people for life.

    I look at it like this: if you are a professional, or even a college player, and you want to keep up with the average in your sport and that average is doping, you are going to dope. I think it is a price one pays for putting being an athlete above all other things. I think one can make it to the pros with all natural work ethic, but are you going to have a HOF career? It depends I guess. I guess what I am getting at this: Barry Bonds was a HOF’er the moment he stepped on the diamond in 1986(?). He did not need to dope. He did not need to do that to himself, his reputation, and to that record that he broke and is now tainted. You could watch him play when he was young with the Pirates and tell that he was a great player. So I think as a fan, it is more infuriating than anything else. It’s like being told that your child whom you know is a math wiz cheated on an algebra test. It’s not the cheating. It’s the frustration of knowing that he didn’t need to cheat to accomplish what he did in his career. It’s sad really.

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  6. Robert A. McReynolds:
    Shoeless Joe was not part of that conspiracy. There has never been adequate proof that he had anything to do with it, and when you look at his stats for that series, it’s very difficult to say that he was throwing anything.

    You may be right.

    Though Jackson signed a confession in 1920 stating that he was paid $5,000 (out of the $20,000 he was promised), he later asserted that a team lawyer manipulated him into signing a document he didn’t fully understand.

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  7. My daughter played soccer at NCSU. She was the designated pee-er. There were several woman where that title was dubious. One in particular that when she entered the weight room even some of the male football players were embarrassed. The program was ranked nationally all four years my daughter did the peeing.

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  8. PhCheese:
    My daughter played soccer at NCSU. She was the designated pee-er. There were several woman where that title was dubious. One in particular that when she entered the weight room even some of the male football players were embarrassed. The program was ranked nationally all four years my daughter did the peeing.

    Oh dear. Of course this has been an Olympics issue for years with the Eastern European countries.

    And even “on court,” I’ll admit I harbored suspicions about Martina Navratilova.

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  9. “Wherever there are rules, someone is cheating.” — Me.

    Why?  The rules are written in the first place to make things fair, increasing the chances that only the superior talent (or skill) will prevail.  Unless, of course, one’s odds can be improved by getting away with a slight transgression.  If the tactic works, it is copied.  Then the rules are changed to prevent (or incorporate) the behavior and the cycle starts again.  Unavoidable. If you aren’t naturally the best, you find a way to succeed anyway.

    Why, yes, I have been accused of cynicism.  Why do you ask?

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  10. EThompson:

    Robert A. McReynolds:
    Shoeless Joe was not part of that conspiracy. There has never been adequate proof that he had anything to do with it, and when you look at his stats for that series, it’s very difficult to say that he was throwing anything.

    You may be right.

    Though Jackson signed a confession in 1920 stating that he was paid $5,000 (out of the $20,000 he was promised), he later asserted that a team lawyer manipulated him into signing a document he didn’t fully understand.

    Yeah a confession he couldn’t read and was told that he would not be in trouble.

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