TOTD 2018-10-13: Quotes

Time for something from Chesterton. (I have to keep Blumroch happy.)

  1. What embitters the world is not excess of criticism, but an absence of self-criticism.
  2. Moderate strength is shown in violence, supreme strength is shown in levity.
  3. The reformer is always right about what is wrong. He is generally wrong about what is right.

UPDATE: There was originally only the first quote but then I founds some more.

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15 thoughts on “TOTD 2018-10-13: Quotes”

  1. 10 Cents:
    Time for something from Chesterton. (I have to keep Blumroch happy.)

    Why should you ? 😉

    Anyway, a quote by Chesterton is as sure a bait for me as “Grid is Good” is for *Tron [2.0]* admirers and as “Greed is Good” is for… no comment. 😉

    A quote for a quote, then. Here’s one taken from the prophetic and too little-known *The Flying Inn*. Patrick Dalroy is speaking while heading the fight against local traitors and their imported accomplices : “I will tell you the truth. Our rulers have come to count on the bare bodily cowardice of a mass of Englishmen, as a sheep dog counts on the cowardice of a flock of sheep. Now, look here, Mr. Wimpole, wouldn’t a shepherd be wise to limit the number of his dogs if he could make his sheep pay by it? At the end you might find millions of sheep managed by a solitary dog. But that is because they are sheep. Suppose the sheep were turned by a miracle into wolves. There are very few dogs they could not tear in pieces. But, what is my practical point, there are really very few dogs to tear.”. A few moments later, he reveals the familiar hidden agenda of the new tyranny : “Victory over barbarians. Employment of barbarians. Alliance with barbarians. Conquest by barbarians. That is the great destiny of Empire.”

    Everyone knows the sentence in *Orthodoxy* about Christian virtues gone mad. It might be useful to remind the full paragraph because the last sentence explains everything : “The modern world is not evil; in some ways the modern world is far too good. It is full of wild and wasted virtues. When a religious scheme is shattered (as Christianity was shattered at the Reformation), it is not merely the vices that are let loose. The vices are, indeed, let loose, and they wander and do damage. But the virtues are let loose also; and the virtues wander more wildly, and the virtues do more terrible damage. The modern world is full of the old Christian virtues gone mad. The virtues have gone mad because they have been isolated from each other and are wandering alone.”

    I *should* not like Chesterton, not only for theological reasons, but also because he did not like, among a few of the names *I* do like, Anthony Hope, Omar Khayyam and Nietzsche. Yet, this great sophist had his reasons indeed, and he stated them extremely well. He also had this special grace that most of the time, his paradoxes conclude and start a solid *reasoning* — they are as a *terminus ad quem* than a *terminus a quo*.

    P.S. : France knows almost nothing about Spooner, but does a little better about Chesterton, as this site proves it (“les amis de Chesterton” = “Friends of Chesterton”) :

    http://www.amisdechesterton.fr/

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  2. Blumroch:

    10 Cents:
    Time for something from Chesterton. (I have to keep Blumroch happy.)

    Why should you ? 😉

    Anyway, a quote by Chesterton is as sure a bait for me as “Grid is Good” is for Tron admirers and as “Greed is Good” is for… no comment. 😉

    A quote for a quote, then. Here’s one taken from the prophetic and too little-known *The Flying Inn*. Patrick Dalroy is speaking while heading the fight against local traitors and their imported accomplices : “I will tell you the truth. Our rulers have come to count on the bare bodily cowardice of a mass of Englishmen, as a sheep dog counts on the cowardice of a flock of sheep. Now, look here, Mr. Wimpole, wouldn’t a shepherd be wise to limit the number of his dogs if he could make his sheep pay by it? At the end you might find millions of sheep managed by a solitary dog. But that is because they are sheep. Suppose the sheep were turned by a miracle into wolves. There are very few dogs they could not tear in pieces. But, what is my practical point, there are really very few dogs to tear.”. A few moments later, he reveals the familiar hidden agenda of the new tyranny : “Victory over barbarians. Employment of barbarians. Alliance with barbarians. Conquest by barbarians. That is the great destiny of Empire.”

    Everyone knows the sentence in *Orthodoxy* about Christian virtues gone mad. It might be useful to remind the full paragraph because the last sentence explains everything : “The modern world is not evil; in some ways the modern world is far too good. It is full of wild and wasted virtues. When a religious scheme is shattered (as Christianity was shattered at the Reformation), it is not merely the vices that are let loose. The vices are, indeed, let loose, and they wander and do damage. But the virtues are let loose also; and the virtues wander more wildly, and the virtues do more terrible damage. The modern world is full of the old Christian virtues gone mad. The virtues have gone mad because they have been isolated from each other and are wandering alone.”

    I *should* not like Chesterton, not only for theological reasons, but also because he did not like, among a few of the names *I* do like, Anthony Hope, Omar Khayyam and Nietzsche. Yet, this great sophist had his reasons indeed, and he stated them extremely well. He also had this special grace that most of the time, his paradoxes conclude and start a solid *reasoning* — they are as a *terminus ad quem* than a *terminus a quo*.

    P.S. : France knows almost nothing about Spooner, but does a little better about Chesterton, as this site proves it (“les amis de Chesterton” = “Friends of Chesterton”) :

    http://www.amisdechesterton.fr/

    That is a wonderful quote. I especially liked this.

    The modern world is full of the old Christian virtues gone mad. The virtues have gone mad because they have been isolated from each other and are wandering alone.

    This explains a lot of the evil that happens. The “good” thing is used to destroy because it is not in balance. What amazes me about Chesterton was he saw so much of the present coming and wrote about it. He also wrote many different types of things. He had fun. He had the strength to show levity. I like this from him.

    There is a vital objection to the advice merely to grin and bear it. The objection is that if you merely bear it, you do not grin.

     

    I enjoy clear thinking even if it goes against my beliefs.

    Do you remember Chesterton in English or French? A combination?

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  3. 10 Cents:
    I enjoy clear thinking even if it goes against my beliefs.

    Do you remember Chesterton in English or French? A combination?

    #MeToo. I’m a dogmatic and I know I’m right, but I can appreciate dogmatics who are wrong. 😉 I let you discover where Chesterton attributes something similar (and wittier) to a famous English writer. 😉

    Both, of course. I’ve read many of his works first in French when I was young (thanks to Bergier who was a *The Man Who Was Thursday* fan), then I checked the translations by L’Age d’Homme against the originals when discovering the huge amount of texts still unpublished here — I thank Penguin Books for printed texts, and Gutenberg Project for files.

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  4. Who is GK Chesterton? I meant to ask this some 18 months ago when I first “ran away” as he is never mentioned in anything relating to the Left.

    I find I admire the quotes that are offered, and yet there is still this big blank as far as knowing who the person is.

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  5. Blumroch:

    10 Cents:
    I enjoy clear thinking even if it goes against my beliefs.

    Do you remember Chesterton in English or French? A combination?

    #MeToo. I’m dogmatic and I know I’m right, but I can appreciate dogmatics who are wrong. 😉 I let you discover where Chesterton attributes something similar (and wittier) to a famous English writer. 😉

    Both, of course. I’ve read many of his works first in French when I was young (thanks to Bergier who was a *The Man Who Was Thursday* fan), then I checked the translations by L’Age d’Homme against the originals when discovering the huge amount of texts still unpublished here — I thank Penguin Books for printed texts, and Gutenberg Project for files.

    Bergier is mentioned in “The Morning of The Magicians” which is very fascinating reading. That book is speculative as all get out, but then with a spouse who has been on “Coast to Coast Am” that is par for the course around here.

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  6. Carol Sterritt:
    Who is GK Chesterton? I meant to ask this some 18 months ago when I first “ran away” as he is never mentioned in anything relating to the Left.

    I find I admire the quotes that are offered, and yet there is still this big blank as far as knowing who the person is.

    Among other things he wrote the Father Brown mysteries. He early works are in the public domain and easily downloaded from Project Gutenberg. Read one of them and tell us what you think. In “Heretics”, he skewers different writers of around the turn of the century. (19th to 20th)

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  7. Carol Sterritt:

    Blumroch:

    Bergier is mentioned in “The Morning of The Magicians” which is very fascinating reading. That book is speculative as all get out, but then with a spouse who has been on “Coast to Coast Am” that is par for the course around here.

    Bergier was in fact the co-author of the book with right-winger Louis Pauwels. Among many, many other things, he played an essential part in introducing S.F. and Fantasy in France. His book *Admirations* was dozens of years ahead current craze about Tolkien, Lewis, Howard and a few others, at a time nobody here knew any of these names. He was also among the first to talk about cryptocracy, even though in sometimes too speculative a way. I owe him many a name I appreciate, including Chesterton — about the latter, this “fiche de police” (“police record” ?) is adequate :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton

    The best thing, as Mr 10 Cents said it *supra*, is to read him, whether you’re a catholic or not and even whether you’re a christian or not (I’m not, yet I value Chesterton). For a start, I would recommend any of these : *Heretics*, *Orthodoxy*, *The Man Who Was Thursday*, *The Flying Inn* (very adequate for the times we know in european union Evil Empire), *The Napoleon of Notting Hill* and *St. Thomas Aquinas*.

    P.S. : Did not understand the “Coast to Coast Am” reference. Remember I’m an alien even in France. 😉

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  8. Carol Sterritt:
    Who is GK Chesterton? I meant to ask this some 18 months ago when I first “ran away” as he is never mentioned in anything relating to the Left.

    I find I admire the quotes that are offered, and yet there is still this big blank as far as knowing who the person is.

    Carol, he had strong association with political concepts involving subsidiarity and distributism. Small business entrepreneurship and federalism fit well with his ideas.  That’s likely why you like his quotes when you see them. Wrote interesting mystery detective  fiction, too.

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  9. Blumroch:

    Carol Sterritt:

    Blumroch:

    Bergier is mentioned in “The Morning of The Magicians” which is very fascinating reading. That book is speculative as all get out, but then with a spouse who has been on “Coast to Coast Am” that is par for the course around here.

    Bergier was in fact the co-author of the book with right-winger Louis Pauwels. Among many, many other things, he played an essential part in introducing S.F. and Fantasy in France. His book *Admirations* was dozens of years ahead current craze about Tolkien, Lewis, Howard and a few others, at a time nobody here knew any of these names. He was also among the first to talk about cryptocracy, even though in sometimes too speculative a way. I owe him many a name I appreciate, including Chesterton — about the latter, this “fiche de police” (“police record” ?) is adequate :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton

    The best thing, as Mr 10 Cents said it *supra*, is to read him, whether you’re a catholic or not and even whether you’re a christian or not (I’m not, yet I value Chesterton). For a start, I would recommend any of these : *Heretics*, *Orthodoxy*, *The Man Who Was Thursday*, *The Flying Inn* (very adequate for the times we know in european union Evil Empire), *The Napoleon of Notting Hill* and *St. Thomas Aquinas*.

    P.S. : Did not understand the “Coast to Coast Am” reference. Remember I’m an alien even in France. 😉

    “The Man Who Was Thursday” is a fun read. Chesterton covers spy and counter-spy well. He also writes about the ineffectual.

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  10. Bob Thompson:

    Carol Sterritt:
    Who is GK Chesterton? I meant to ask this some 18 months ago when I first “ran away” as he is never mentioned in anything relating to the Left.

    I find I admire the quotes that are offered, and yet there is still this big blank as far as knowing who the person is.

    Carol, he had strong association with political concepts involving subsidiarity and distributism. Small business entrepreneurship and federalism fit well with his ideas.  That’s likely why you like his quotes when you see them. Wrote interesting mystery detective  fiction, too.

    What strikes me as weird about his status is that  he is revered by people on the right, but he remains unmentioned by people on the Left. I mean, I never heard a peep about him. Various people who are admired by the Center and by the Right are smacked around by the Left, but he seems to have either gone unnoticed, or else there is simply nothing bad about him that can be said.

    Anyway, thank you for the information and I do mean to check him out. (probably starting with his detective books.)

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  11. Blumroch:

    Carol Sterritt:

    Blumroch:

    Bergier is mentioned in “The Morning of The Magicians” which is very fascinating reading. That book is speculative as all get out, but then with a spouse who has been on “Coast to Coast Am” that is par for the course around here.

    Bergier was in fact the co-author of the book with right-winger Louis Pauwels. Among many, many other things, he played an essential part in introducing S.F. and Fantasy in France. His book *Admirations* was dozens of years ahead current craze about Tolkien, Lewis, Howard and a few others, at a time nobody here knew any of these names. He was also among the first to talk about cryptocracy, even though in sometimes too speculative a way. I owe him many a name I appreciate, including Chesterton — about the latter, this “fiche de police” (“police record” ?) is adequate :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton

    The best thing, as Mr 10 Cents said it *supra*, is to read him, whether you’re a catholic or not and even whether you’re a christian or not (I’m not, yet I value Chesterton). For a start, I would recommend any of these : *Heretics*, *Orthodoxy*, *The Man Who Was Thursday*, *The Flying Inn* (very adequate for the times we know in european union Evil Empire), *The Napoleon of Notting Hill* and *St. Thomas Aquinas*.

    P.S. : Did not understand the “Coast to Coast Am” reference. Remember I’m an alien even in France. 😉

    Coast to Coast Am is a radio show that was founded by Art Bell. It is a world wide phenomena, although it has dipped in popularity after Bell left and George Noory took over, back around 2003. One of the show’s major premises is that in the wee hours, people are willing to consider the implausible and fantastic, much more easily than during the more rational daylight sector of our time lines.

    Any kooky conspiracy theory out there is talked about. Alien abductions; proof that intelligent life once ruled on Mars. The later discussions came about  due to the giant sculpted face one of our rockets picked up as an image on Mars’s surface.

    Past lives experiences. Remote viewing, supposedly explained by CIA-trained assets. Sometimes little snippets of interesting items – like the 45 seconds of hell that was reported to be recorded by Russian explorers who came upon a hole in Siberia. (The noises are indeed hellish – but who knows whether there was a  hole or there were any Russian explorers?)

    Discussions of haunted places in Chicago, including one of my childhood legends – the ghost of “Mary” who gets rides back to her cemetery from Chicago drivers. (She wears the same 19th century garb now as she did back in the day.)

    Bit coin has been discussed on Noory’s show. Both shows have allowed exposure for people whose voices are silenced by major media, including various nuclear critics, HAARP, chem trail researchers,  and vaccine critics.

    I always saw Art’s show as a radio version of the old camp fire stories. You don’t necessarily believe everything someone says when telling wild tales at a camp fire, but since no one is yet willing to go off and sleep, and the tales entertain, a great deal of fun is had.

    Art has this amazing sonorous voice, which few others in the industry now possess.

    Here are some programs from Art, the last one being put here due to it almost being Halloween. The Halloween program is certainly worth the time it takes to listen to it.

    ART BELL / COAST TO COAST AM (Bumper Music) – YouTube (12 minutes)

    This show featuring the “Time Traveler” who comes to us from the 2063 era, is over an hour long, but really dramatic and entertaining.

    Art Bell & Time Traveller Single Seven – YouTube

    Art Bell Ghost to Ghost 1993 Coast to Coast AM Classic – YouTube

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  12. Blumroch:

    Carol Sterritt:

    Blumroch:

    Bergier is mentioned in “The Morning of The Magicians” which is very fascinating reading. That book is speculative as all get out, but then with a spouse who has been on “Coast to Coast Am” that is par for the course around here.

    Bergier was in fact the co-author of the book with right-winger Louis Pauwels. Among many, many other things, he played an essential part in introducing S.F. and Fantasy in France. His book *Admirations* was dozens of years ahead current craze about Tolkien, Lewis, Howard and a few others, at a time nobody here knew any of these names. He was also among the first to talk about cryptocracy, even though in sometimes too speculative a way. I owe him many a name I appreciate, including Chesterton — about the latter, this “fiche de police” (“police record” ?) is adequate :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._K._Chesterton

    The best thing, as Mr 10 Cents said it *supra*, is to read him, whether you’re a catholic or not and even whether you’re a christian or not (I’m not, yet I value Chesterton). For a start, I would recommend any of these : *Heretics*, *Orthodoxy*, *The Man Who Was Thursday*, *The Flying Inn* (very adequate for the times we know in european union Evil Empire), *The Napoleon of Notting Hill* and *St. Thomas Aquinas*.

    P.S. : Did not understand the “Coast to Coast Am” reference. Remember I’m an alien even in France. 😉

    I saw Bergier’s name on the cover of the book: “The Morning of The Magicians” but it seemed like Pauwels was the narrator. I am re-reading the book for the third time, and it doesn’t seem like it is told in Bergeire’s voice but Pauwel’s. Although Bergiere is discussed. This is not a usual situation, for someone to be listed as the author but talked about in the third person.

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  13. Carol Sterritt:

     

    Coast to Coast Am is a radio show that was founded by Art Bell. It is a world wide phenomena, although it has dipped in popularity after Bell left and George Noory took over, back around 2003. One of the show’s major premises is that in the wee hours, people are willing to consider the implausible and fantastic, much more easily than during the more rational daylight sector of our time lines.

    Any kooky conspiracy theory out there is talked about. Alien abductions; proof that intelligent life once ruled on Mars. The later discussions came about  due to the giant sculpted face one of our rockets picked up as an image on Mars’s surface.

    Past lives experiences. Remote viewing, supposedly explained by CIA-trained assets. Sometimes little snippets of interesting items – like the 45 seconds of hell that was reported to be recorded by Russian explorers who came upon a hole in Siberia. (The noises are indeed hellish – but who knows whether there was a  hole or there were any Russian explorers?)

    Discussions of haunted places in Chicago, including one of my childhood legends – the ghost of “Mary” who gets rides back to her cemetery from Chicago drivers. (She wears the same 19th century garb now as she did back in the day.)

    Bit coin has been discussed on Noory’s show. Both shows have allowed exposure for people whose voices are silenced by major media, including various nuclear critics, HAARP, chem trail researchers,  and vaccine critics.

    I always saw Art’s show as a radio version of the old camp fire stories. You don’t necessarily believe everything someone says when telling wild tales at a camp fire, but since no one is yet willing to go off and sleep, and the tales entertain, a great deal of fun is had.

    Art has this amazing sonorous voice, which few others in the industry now possess.

    Here are some programs from Art, the last one being put here due to it almost being Halloween. The Halloween program is certainly worth the time it takes to listen to it.

    Thank you for all these data — until now, I had never seen the name of this Art Bell. Seems he was (more than) a little in the fringe domains. 😉 Here in France, as far as I know, there were no such nationwide radio program, but many books published by Robert Laffont in their “Les chemins de l’impossible” series (“Paths of the impossible”) and by J’ai Lu in their “L’aventure mystérieuse” (“Mysterious adventures”) series, where the (very uncommon) good was next to the (overrepresented) *very* bad about such fortean topics (without Charles Fort’s humour). Such books, when they’re correctly done, can be a variant of fantasy literature. Your analogy with fire camp stories is well-chosen.

    Again, thank you for taking the time to explain me what this mysterious (to me) “Coast to Coast Am” was and for selecting the videos I’ll check tomorrow (it’s getting very late here).

    P.S. edit/fix : May I suggest you do not *begin* reading Chesterton with Father Brown stories ? They’re good, they’re interesting, they’re entertaining, of course, but I dare say the titles I had given *supra* are probably better choices to discover him (*Heretics*, *The Man Who Was Thursday*). Then, you’ll very probably try and read *everything* from GKC ! 😉 My (not so) humble 2 cents — but they’re worth their weight !

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  14. Carol Sterritt:

    I saw Bergier’s name on the cover of the book: “The Morning of The Magicians” but it seemed like Pauwels was the narrator. I am re-reading the book for the third time, and it doesn’t seem like it is told in Bergeire’s voice but Pauwel’s. Although Bergiere is discussed. This is not a usual situation, for someone to be listed as the author but talked about in the third person.

    Bergier supplied all the data but Pauwels wrote the stories (he had much better writing skills than Bergier). Don’t know what the translation is worth, but the book is indeed a weird and unique one. Bergier tells about *Le matin des magiciens* in his memoirs *Je ne suis pas une légende* (*I am not a legend*). It launched the *mouvement Planète*, with an interesting magazine about many, many topics, including those referred to in *Le matin des magiciens* and its following *L’homme éternel*. A chapter of *Je ne suis pas une légende* was suppressed by the publisher because Bergier wrote truthful and acid remarks about the masses of low I.Q. bozos who wanted the “réalisme fantastique” (“fantastic realism” ?) to become an ersatz of religion.

    Of the two co-authors, the most clever and the most unique character is Bergier, not Pauwels. That’s the reason for Blumroch handle, by the way. 😉

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