Where the “Ratburger” name came from?

After long and careful investigation, I think I may have found the source or the inspiration for the name “Ratburger”.

The source is just a small snippet from this movie.

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Author: G.D.

I'm from Pensyltucky. Can trace my ancestry directly to whom the present day national anthem of Poland is written about. Presently repair slot machines at a casino.

23 thoughts on “Where the “Ratburger” name came from?”

  1. 10 Cents:
    Gerry, don’t be giving away our secrets. The cover story is in our FAQ.

    https://www.ratburger.org/index.php/frequently-asked-questions/

    But that’s for the media, the real reason for the name may have been discovered! I would note, to our gentle readers, that your quick response to negate my claims and intensive investigation may truly indicate a coverup! That’s what it exactly is, a “cover story“.

    (Actually, I just perchance tuned my Windoze media center to my HD Home Run cable box and that was the movie that was playing at the exact same scene. Fate, as some would claim.)

    Go figure!

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  2. Bravo, Gerry (1) ! And you even found this revelation in one of the movies best depicting and satirizing life as SJWs(3) would like it to be (at least for others, because for them as rulers, rules would probably be different, according to their usual double standards policy) : without any pleasure of any kind. As mentionned in French wikipedia entry about *Demolition Man* : “Dans le film, la cigarette, l’alcool, la caféine, la viande, les sports de contact, les vulgarités, le chocolat, l’essence, les jouets non éducatifs(2), la nourriture épicée, le sel, le sexe par contact physique, les baisers, l’avortement et la grossesse sans autorisation préfectorale sont considérés comme mauvais et sont interdits.” i.e. approximately “In the movie, smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, caffeine, meat, contact sports, profanities, chocolate, gasoline, non-educational toys(2), spicy food, salt, physical contact sex, kissing, aborting and pregnancy without government authorization are considered bad and are prohibited.”. Now, we can fear they would too promote *manburger* in the *Soylent Green* way…

    (1) If you allow me to use your first name.

    (2) I have recommended Saki in another post. With “The Toys of Peace”, he wrote the definitive short story about so-called “educational toys”, readable here, among others sources :

    https://americanliterature.com/author/hh-munro-saki/short-story/the-toys-of-peace

    (3) P.S. edit/fix : This came to my mind while thinking of the way Mencken (and a few others of various countries, all practicing “scorn with added vitriol”) would define today’s leftist oligarchy : “Social Justice : The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be *free*.”

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  3. Gerry D:
    But that’s for the media, the real reason for the name may have been discovered! I would note, to our gentle readers, that your quick response to negate my claims and intensive investigation may truly indicate a coverup! That’s what it exactly is, a “cover story“.

    Ummmm . . . Why didn’t you make this conversation private, then? You’ve blown the cover sky-high!

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  4. Seawriter:

    Gerry D:
    But that’s for the media, the real reason for the name may have been discovered! I would note, to our gentle readers, that your quick response to negate my claims and intensive investigation may truly indicate a coverup! That’s what it exactly is, a “cover story“.

    Ummmm . . . Why didn’t you make this conversation private, then? You’ve blown the cover sky-high!

    The best place to hide something is in plain sight. If it was private people might want to read it. Our cover story is safe.

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  5. Gerry D:
    10 Cents said that “private” had been turned off temporarily. That’s why it wasn’t private.

    Since when have you ever listened to me?

    BTW, Private has always worked.

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  6. 10 Cents:
    BTW, Private has always worked.

    It was password protection of posts which was disabled.  It has now been entirely removed, since it is a useless feature for a site like this.  Details will be in tonight’s post on the Updates group.

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  7. I hadn’t thought of that old Wobbly Utah Phillips in ages. He had some good songs even though he was a communist.

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  8. Blumroch:
    Bravo, Gerry (1) !

    (1) If you allow me to use your first name.

    If I allow you? What if I said no?

    Don’t be silly, you can certainly use my first name.

    🙂

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  9. John Walker:

    10 Cents:
    BTW, Private has always worked.

    It was password protection of posts which was disabled.  It has now been entirely removed, since it is a useless feature for a site like this.  Details will be in tonight’s post on the Updates group.

    Thanks John, but another serious question..

    Is that the reason for the two black blocks on the screen when I view , Activity, Notifications?

    (Firefox Quantum 60.0.1 (64-bit), Running under Windows 7.)

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  10. Gerry D:

    10 Cents:

    Gerry D:

    Blumroch:
    Bravo, Gerry (1) !

    (1) If you allow me to use your first name.

    If I allow you? What if I said no?

    Don’t be silly, you can certainly use my first name.

    🙂

    Can I?

    Only if you preface it with “Mister”.

    Mister Gerry, you are too kind.

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  11. Gerry D:

    If I allow you? What if I said no?

    Don’t be silly, you can certainly use my first name.

    🙂

    Should you say “no”, I would just revert to the more formal “Mr Gerry D” — though it should even be just “Mr D” according to older standards here. 😉 Directly using first name when one is not a friend is rather recent a fashion in France (a fashion imported from the U.S. of A.), as is saying “tu” instead of “vous” when talking with mere colleagues and acquaintances (*here* in France, both newer practices are used in order to fake a “getting together” illusory and deceptive feeling, and also in order to have people forget that someone is still their boss, even if everyone fakes familiarity and superficial sympathy everywhere). For us older people, it’s always a little strange to see American people directly using first names — I would *never* call John Walker “John” for I’m neither a friend nor even an acquaintance ; I would only use “Sir” (“Monsieur”).

    Let’s imagine my name is Chad Mulligan (it is *not*) : today, in order to ask me what I think, most conditioned younger people (up to 30 or 40 years old) would say “Chad, qu’en penses-tu ?” (or worse : “Chad, t’en penses quoi ?”), while older ones would still say “Monsieur Mulligan, qu’en pensez-vous ?” (though normally, you’re not supposed to remind someone of his own name, unless there are many people around). Older *educated* ones would even say either “Monsieur, qu’en pensez-vous ?” (if they don’t know me) or “Mulligan, qu’en pensez-vous ?” (if they know me). For any of the older people, “Chad, qu’en penses-tu ?” would be used only by close friends or family members. There were such little subtleties, in forgotten good old days.

    P.S. : No treaty about good manners says anything about names which are just a handle. 😉 Note here, just in case, Blumroch could be Philippe Blumroch. 😉

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  12. Blumroch:

    Gerry D:

    If I allow you? What if I said no?

    Don’t be silly, you can certainly use my first name.

    🙂

    Should you say “no”, I would just revert to the more formal “Mr Gerry D” — though it should even be just “Mr D” according to older standards here. 😉 Directly using first name when one is not a friend is rather recent a fashion in France (a fashion imported from the U.S. of A.), as is saying “tu” instead of “vous” when talking with mere colleagues and acquaintances (*here* in France, both newer practices are used in order to fake a “getting together” illusory and deceptive feeling, and also in order to have people forget that someone is still their boss, even if everyone fakes familiarity and superficial sympathy everywhere). For us older people, it’s always a little strange to see American people directly using first names — I would *never* call John Walker “John” for I’m neither a friend nor even an acquaintance ; I would only use “Sir” (“Monsieur”).

    Let’s imagine my name is Chad Mulligan (it is *not*) : today, in order to ask me what I think, most conditioned younger people (up to 30 or 40 years old) would say “Chad, qu’en penses-tu ?” (or worse : “Chad, t’en penses quoi ?”), while older ones would still say “Monsieur Mulligan, qu’en pensez-vous ?” (though normally, you’re not supposed to remind someone of his own name, unless there are many people around). Older *educated* ones would even say either “Monsieur, qu’en pensez-vous ?” (if they don’t know me) or “Mulligan, qu’en pensez-vous ?” (if they know me). For any of the older people, “Chad, qu’en penses-tu ?” would be used only by close friends or family members. There were such little subtleties, in forgotten good old days.

    P.S. : No treaty about good manners says anything about names which are just a handle. 😉 Note here, just in case, Blumroch could be Philippe Blumroch. 😉

    It depends on the society, Blumroch. I agree that American norms are not the usual but they have a up side as well as a down side. Some of us have spent years together online. It is hard to be formal after that.

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  13. 10 Cents:

    It depends on the society, Blumroch. I agree that American norms are not the usual but they have a up side as well as a down side. Some of us have spent years together online. It is hard to be formal after that.

    From very old books I’ve read (Mencken, Bierce, Poe and a few other very dead writers), I suppose so, but I was just refering to what seems your current usage, noting how puzzling it seems to us *older* people. No offense was intended.

    Side note : well, because of Mervyn LeRoy’s movie, I thought society was divided between “East Side” and “West Side” (horizontality), not “up” and “down” (verticality : this is… yup, *judgmental* !). 😉

    P.S. edit/fix : I’ve been “online” from the days of Compu$erve and before that, of BBSes (ah, the Zyxel days…). 😉

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  14. Blumroch:
    Side note : well, because of Mervyn LeRoy’s movie, I thought society was divided between “East Side” and “West Side” (horizontality), not “up” and “down” (verticality : this is… yup, *judgmental* !). 😉

    P.S. edit/fix : I’ve been “online” from the days of Compu$erve and before that, of BBSes (ah, the Zyxel days…). 😉

    I believe in the phrase “up side”, one may be referring to a “good side”, you can extrapolate the rest.

    So, being online since the days of Compu$erve and again before that would put us about the same age.

    (Just something I dug up from one of my shelves down here in the basement…)

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  15. Gerry D:

    I believe in the phrase “up side”, one may be referring to a “good side”, you can extrapolate the rest.

    So, being online since the days of Compu$erve and again before that would put us about the same age.

    I was born in 63 “with a gift of sarcasm and a sense that the world was mad” (Sabatini slightly modified, for “laughter” is too kind), and I was born *old* (in French : “Je suis né vieux”). 😉 AIM65, Apple ][+ and the like… 😉

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  16. Blumroch:

    Gerry D:

    I believe in the phrase “up side”, one may be referring to a “good side”, you can extrapolate the rest.

    So, being online since the days of Compu$erve and again before that would put us about the same age.

    I was born in 63 “with a gift of sarcasm and a sense that the world was mad” (Sabatini slightly modified, for “laughter” is too kind), and I was born *old* (in French : “Je suis né vieux”). 😉 AIM65, Apple ][+ and the like… 😉

    Maybe not the same physical age, I was born at the end of 51. I might say about myself, that I “grew” old maybe ten years ago. I was self taught in electronics, in the days of tubes. Computers came at a later part of my life.

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  17. Gerry D:

    Maybe not the same physical age, I was born at the end of 51. I might say about myself, that I “grew” old maybe ten years ago.

    Online chats had people think I was an *old* reactionary university teacher having read a lot, while I was still way under 30 (at the time). 😉

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  18. Gerry D:
    Is that the reason for the two black blocks on the screen when I view Activity, Notifications?

    The two black blocks on the Activity and Notifications pages are where the forward and back arrows go when there is more than one page of Activity or Notifications.  Any sane programmer would have made the icon for this case transparent, but the WordPress developers are not sane programmers; they are nincompoops.

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