Brasil

Brazil elected a more-or-less conventional conservative with populist inflection to the presidency yesterday by a solid margin (55%/45%). There are a few interesting elements:

  1. His base of support includes young voters (16–24; 16 year-olds can vote in Brazil).
  2. He’s an immigration skeptic, favoring more restrictions.
  3. He favors gun rights.
  4. He opposes affirmative action/racial quotas.
  5. He favors privatization of state-owned enterprises.
  6. He is characterized as “far-right” by the media, including Fox.* Of course, the usual suspects also characterized him as an extremist.

Add this to the ascendancy of somewhat similar parties in Europe (e.g., AfD) and it’s starting to look like a movement of global extent. President Trump has already congratulated the president-elect.


*The title of this item, Brazil elects far-right president, worrying rights groups, was subsequently revised but is still visible in the URL:
http://www.foxnews.com/world/brazil-elects-far-right-president-worrying-rights-groups.amp

The memory hole is not what it used to be.

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Author: drlorentz

photon whisperer & quantum mechanic

12 thoughts on “Brasil”

  1. How’s Argentina’s new president doing?

    Any chance Trump and those two can get something done on trade?

    Near as I can tell, MERCOSUR exists to keep US companies out and enslave the region to Brazilian and Argentine industry just like the EU was intended to keep the US out of Europe to benefit French and German industry. So if Brazil and Argentina are on board, the others should follow.

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  2. ctlaw:
    How’s Argentina’s new president doing?

    I gave up on Argentine politics long ago. Last I heard, they’re facing a new default crisis. When I was young, my father used to lament that Argentina had all the makings of a prosperous country: soil as rich as the American prairie, abundant natural resources, and great natural beauty. The problem was (and remains) the people: mañana culture, rampant corruption, and the resulting low-trust society.

    All the same applies to the rest of Latin America. The recent election results in Brazil don’t change any of that. The results are noteworthy because they are antithetical to the culture. If these ideas can gain traction even in Brazil, and especially among the youth, it’s worthy of mention even as the youth in the US turn toward socialism. Nevertheless, expect Brazil to return to form after a few years. A leopard cannot change its spots.

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  3. it’s starting to look like a movement of global extent.

    It’s a fascinating time in geopolitics… and a bit scary.

    I think of the reformation and all of the peasant revolts that coincided through Europe in the 1500s.

    I wonder how this will be written about in several hundred years. What was the catalyst?

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  4. 10 Cents:
    Is the a special reason the title of this post has the Spanish spelling of Brazil?

    Maybe that they are a lone s. American country following in Europe’s footsteps, suggesting a continued, strong, cultural tie to their colonizer?

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  5. Stina:

    10 Cents:
    Is the a special reason the title of this post has the Spanish spelling of Brazil?

    Maybe that they are a lone s. American country following in Europe’s footsteps, suggesting a continued, strong, cultural tie to their colonizer?

    They speak Portuguese and Portugal had colonies for a long time. Brazil became independent in 1822.

    In 1910, there was a revolution that deposed the monarchy. Amid corruption, repression of the church, and the near bankruptcy of the state, a military coup in 1926 installed a dictatorship that remained until another coup in 1974. The new government instituted sweeping democratic reforms and granted independence to all of Portugal’s African colonies in 1975. (From Wiki)

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  6. 10 Cents:
    Is the a special reason the title of this post has the Spanish spelling of Brazil?

    I would have characterized it as the Portuguese spelling, but OK. The country’s full name in the local language is República Federativa do Brasil. As to why I chose the Portuguese spelling, I thought it made a more eye-catching title: no deep-state conspiracy or plan.

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  7. drlorentz:

    10 Cents:
    Is the a special reason the title of this post has the Spanish spelling of Brazil?

    I would have characterized it as the Portuguese spelling, but OK. The country’s full name in the local language is República Federativa do Brasil. As to why I chose the Portuguese spelling, I thought it made a more eye-catching title: no deep-state conspiracy or plan.

    You are good. Even when you are caught in a deep-state conspiracy, you deny it.

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  8. 10 Cents:

    drlorentz:

    10 Cents:
    Is the a special reason the title of this post has the Spanish spelling of Brazil?

    I would have characterized it as the Portuguese spelling, but OK. The country’s full name in the local language is República Federativa do Brasil. As to why I chose the Portuguese spelling, I thought it made a more eye-catching title: no deep-state conspiracy or plan.

    You are good. Even when you are caught in a deep-state conspiracy, you deny it.

    What kind of deep-state actor would I be otherwise?

    On the way into work today, I heard the 5th of the Bachianas Brasileiras of Heitor Villa Lobos on the radio. Some similarities and difference between Spanish and Portuguese are manifest in the names of the work and the composer. In Spanish it would be Brasileras and Hector. On the other hand, lobo means wolf in both languages. I can read Portuguese only with great difficulty. I’d be hopeless with the spoken language.

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  9. drlorentz:

    10 Cents:

    drlorentz:

    10 Cents:
    Is the a special reason the title of this post has the Spanish spelling of Brazil?

    I would have characterized it as the Portuguese spelling, but OK. The country’s full name in the local language is República Federativa do Brasil. As to why I chose the Portuguese spelling, I thought it made a more eye-catching title: no deep-state conspiracy or plan.

    You are good. Even when you are caught in a deep-state conspiracy, you deny it.

    What kind of deep-state actor would I be otherwise?

    On the way into work today, I heard the 5th of the Bachianas Brasileiras of Heitor Villa Lobos on the radio. Some similarities and difference between Spanish and Portuguese are manifest in the names of the work and the composer. In Spanish it would be Brasileras and Hector. On the other hand, lobo means wolf in both languages. I can read Portuguese only with great difficulty. I’d be hopeless with the spoken language.

     

    I just thought Portugal was the place they put the Spanish with bad spelling and called then called their mistakes a language.

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