Regarding John’s recent post…

Regarding John’s recent post about daylight saving time, I did some more research and found an image from last year. It shows the unusual effort necessary to accomplish this task in some areas. I don’t doubt the same thing will happen again this year.

Also, just image all the garden gnomes, all over the world, doing their part to similarly adjust sundials world wide.

This has to stop!

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Author: G.D.

I'm from Pensyltucky. Can trace my ancestry directly to whom the present day national anthem of Poland is written about. Presently repair slot machines at a casino.

9 thoughts on “Regarding John’s recent post…”

  1. And, imagine how hard it will be to know if they’ve got it right in all of that fog!

    Here is the sundial on the southwest face of the bell tower of the Temple de Lignières (the base of which dates from 1493 or before).

    Cadran solaire: Temple de Lignières

    The sundial works “banker’s hours”—11 to 5—because those are the only hours it’s exposed to the Sun in its location.  On many days, like the one when I took this picture, it’s out of order due to clouds or fog.  It keeps “God’s time” and knows nothing of the fiddling with clocks by politicians or, for that matter, the analemma.

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  2. Don’t sundials adjust as the sun moves from summer position to winter?

    Or does a sundial in summer in Alaska still manage to represent time?

    Alaska and Florida would never be able to work out a suitable schedule.

    As it is, universal time, with zone adjustment, was a byproduct of transcontinental rail travel.

    And it just became embedded from there.

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  3. Stina:
    Don’t sundials adjust as the sun moves from summer position to winter?

    Very few sundials correct for the equation of time and the varying altitude of the Sun in the sky over the year.  One which attempted to do this appeared in the Amateur Scientist column [PDF] in the October 1959 issue of Scientific American.

    Scientific American: October 1959 Amateur Scientist clock time sundial

    Note how the complex curve of the gnomon cleverly uses the altitude of the Sun to compensate for the ellipticity of the Earth’s orbit.  It even has a gimmick to adjust for dumb summer and winter time, although you have to set that yourself on the day the politicians decree it.

    I really wanted to build one of these when I came across the design in the 1960s, but it would have been forbiddingly difficult to make from metal then.  Today, it would be a fun project for a 3D printer.  Sure enough, it’s already been done.

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  4. We had a client, kind of an old loner up in the hills, albeit with a history of zooming around the county on his Indian motorcycle in his youth, who resolutely refused to go on DST.  It upset his cows.  It upset his cows ever to be fed or milked an hour off schedule, and why should some idiots somewhere command him to upset his cows?  Good question.

    So whenever he phoned in to arrange an appointment on-farm for veterinary services, half the year he would say, for example, nine o’clock, your time.

    I miss him for himself, and I miss him for his keeping us honest.

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  5. jzdro:
    It upset his cows.  It upset his cows ever to be fed or milked an hour off schedule, and why should some idiots somewhere command him to upset his cows?

    In Time Enough for Love, Robert Heinlein tells the Tale of the Man Who Was Too Lazy to Fail.  On farming:

    But David was not a harsh employer.  He suspected that cows did not want to be waked at five in the morning any more than he did—and he undertook to find out.

    He learned that cows would happily change their circadian to more reasonable hours, given the chance.  They had to be milked twice a day; they were bred for that.  But nine o’clock in the morning suited them for a first milking quite as well as five, as long as it was regular.

    But it did not stay that way; Dave’s hired man had the nervous habit of work.  To him there was something sinful in milking a cow that late.  So David let him have his way, and the hired man and the cows went back to their old habits.

    As for Dave, he strung that hammock between the two shade trees and put a table by it to hold a frosty drink.  He would get up in the morning when he woke, whether it was nine or noon, eat breakfast, then walk slowly to his hammock to rest up for lunch.

    Be Dave.

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  6. jzdro:
    We had a client, kind of an old loner up in the hills, albeit with a history of zooming around the county on his Indian motorcycle in his youth, who resolutely refused to go on DST.  It upset his cows.  It upset his cows ever to be fed or milked an hour off schedule, and why should some idiots somewhere command him to upset his cows?  Good question.

    So whenever he phoned in to arrange an appointment on-farm for veterinary services, half the year he would say, for example, nine o’clock, your time.

    I miss him for himself, and I miss him for his keeping us honest.

    Japan was on DST for a short time but it upset traditions and went away.

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  7. Japan was on DST for a short time but it upset traditions and went away.

    Advantage: Japan.

    I hate DST.

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  8. In the summer of ’71 I rode a motorcycle out to see Stonehenge. Somewhere on a back road  between Warminster and Amesbury, I started running into signs that looked, more or less, like this:

    Apparently, I was near the southern end of the Salisbury Plain Training Area where the Brits and their NATO allies play army. Didn’t see any tanks that day but I did notice large wood pilings, like you might see on a pier but bigger, maybe a foot and a half in diameter and banded with steel. There were a pair on either side of the road. I assume the purpose was to have the tanks cross at a point in clear view of traffic coming from either direction. Lots of dings in the pilings like maybe some of the tank drivers were still on their learner’s permit.

    No fog that day, but a heavy cloud cover and a lot of rain, so not much daylight to be saved.

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