Michael Rectenwald on Postmodernism, Social Justice, and Academic Conformity

Professor Michael Rectenwald of New York University used to describe himself as a “libertarian communist” and spent many years embedded in the leftist milieu of the academy.  He then underwent an awakening to the madness of political correctness, the social justice agenda, and the absurdity of postmodern intersectional critical studies of dozens of genders and began to speak out on Twitter, eventually publishing Springtime for Snowflakes, a book about his experiences and what he learned.

Here is an hour and a half interview of Prof. Rectenwald by Glenn Beck on the latter’s podcast.

This is long, but it provides an in-depth look at the history, intellectual roots, and fundamental errors of the disease which has infected the campuses and is spreading into the larger society.  Say what you want about Glenn Beck, he is a superb interviewer who gets out of the way and lets the guest speak directly to the audience.

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Author: John Walker

Founder of Ratburger.org, Autodesk, Inc., and Marinchip Systems. Author of The Hacker's Diet. Creator of www.fourmilab.ch.

5 thoughts on “Michael Rectenwald on Postmodernism, Social Justice, and Academic Conformity”

  1. This book is not available in Amazon in Canada, and only on Kindle in Amazon in the States. Perhaps it is too new. It sounds fascinating. I will be keeping any eye open for it.

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  2. RedFeline:
    This book is not available in Amazon in Canada, and only on Kindle in Amazon in the States. Perhaps it is too new. It sounds fascinating. I will be keeping any eye open for it.


    Red, I am seeing the paperback and Kindle edition on Canada Amazon.

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  3. Listened to the whole thing. Had never heard of Rectenwald before this. It was very good–thanks for posting. 

    He mentioned how one of the objectives of postmodernism is to abolish the family. I would like to ask him a couple things. 1) Without the family, what is the postmodernist plan for raising children? It’s not clear to me at all that they even have a plan. Would he agree with that, or is there some plan? 2) How does he believe civil society best accomplishes the raising of children? 

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