Crazy Fish

My pond is at 52.1F right now, which is very close to the limit where Koi should be fed.  Any colder and the food lays in their digestive tract and rots.  But today they think summer is returning, judging by their reaction to me greeting them a couple of minutes ago.  I quit feeding them a couple of weeks ago when the water temp descended into the mid forties.  Gonna give them a little light lunch today.  When the temp goes down, they generally descend to the bottom, about 5′, and line up like cordwood, ignoring me.

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16 thoughts on “Crazy Fish”

  1. So they don’t eat over the winter, just go dormant?   Well, I reckon yeah: they’re carp, right, and that must be what the ones in our lake do….

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  2. Our nephew bought a house in the NC mountains and the Koi came with the house. He is learning a lot about these fish. His father-in-law enjoys them as much as they do. We were visiting 2 weekends ago and he sounded like a kid asking if he could feed the fish.

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  3. Blondie:
    We were visiting 2 weekends ago and he sounded like a kid asking if he could feed the fish.

    I feel the same! Feeding my beauties is a great pleasure.

    Thanks TW for the post. I now have my eye on your white koi on the upper left side of the picture with black markings.

    It rarely gets cold in Naples but today we reached a high of 64 and the fish were settling in their underwater parking garage (placed at the bottom as a protective hideaway from egrets) all day. I know better than to feed if they’re not actively reacting to your presence pondside.

    As I will be living on Amelia Island this time next year, I will be experiencing more cold spells and am quite appreciative to have made this contact with an expert.

    ‘Carp’ diem, TW! 🙂

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  4. Hypatia:
    So they don’t eat over the winter, just go dormant?   Well, I reckon yeah: they’re carp, right, and that must be what the ones in our lake do….

    Yup , their metabolism goes with the temperature, as they’re cold blooded.  Warm hearts, though.  I read ET’s comments to them and they always perk up.

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  5. EThompson:
    I now have my eye on your white koi on the upper left side of the picture with black markings.

    That’s our largest fish,originally imported from Japan, one we adopted from a local elderly couple in our Northwest Koi and Goldfish Club; they retired from ponding when they moved to a smaller house.  We have two other fish from them, Murano, named after the glass-blowing island near Venice, and Navona, named after the piazza in Roma.

    The big fish’s name is Miyako (miyako (都) means “capital” in Japanese).  Used to have large splotches of red, too, but last year the red all completely faded.  Who knows why?  She is a Doitsu, a sub-variety that can belong to any major variety; they have smooth skin with no scales, especially on their upper body.  For unknown reasons, they sometimes spontaneously lose some or all colors.

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  6. Trinity Waters:
    We have two other fish from them, Murano, named after the glass-blowing island near Venice…

    My favorite wedding gift was given by a friend of my grandmother’s- a magnificent green/gold hand blown vase bought in Venice in 1934.

    Priceless.

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  7. EThompson:

    Trinity Waters:
    We have two other fish from them, Murano, named after the glass-blowing island near Venice…

    My favorite wedding gift was given from a friend of my grandmother’s- a magnificent green/gold hand blown vase bought in Venice in 1934.

    Priceless.

    Pix?

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  8. The little kids loved the fish.  At the Seattle Japanese Garden, they have dozens of those fish, but the last time we were there the water was just full of algae and looked awful, and I don’t think it could have been good for the fish.  I really liked the nice clear water in the little river/pond at Ala Moana.

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  9. Trinity Waters:

    EThompson:
    I now have my eye on your white koi on the upper left side of the picture with black markings.

    That’s our largest fish,originally imported from Japan, one we adopted from a local elderly couple in our Northwest Koi and Goldfish Club; they retired from ponding when they moved to a smaller house.  We have two other fish from them, Murano, named after the glass-blowing island near Venice, and Navona, named after the piazza in Roma.

    The big fish’s name is Miyako (miyako (都) means “capital” in Japanese).  Used to have large splotches of red, too, but last year the red all completely faded.  Who knows why?  She is a Doitsu, a sub-variety that can belong to any major variety; they have smooth skin with no scales, especially on their upper body.  For unknown reasons, they sometimes spontaneously lose some or all colors.

    I have always understood Miyako to mean city, Trin.  Tokyo 東京 is “east” and “capital”.  Kyoto 京都 is “capital” and “city”. Chinese cities: Nanking 南京 is “south” and “capital”.  Peking(Beijin) 北京 is “north” and “capital”.  (Have I bored anyone to death?)

    I looked in a dictionary and it had the meaning capital for Miyako. I think it is a secondary meaning for the word more than its main meaning. I was surprised to see that the kanji for “capital” 京 can also be read as Miyako.

    Trin, it looks like I learned something.  Thanks for these Carp-ing posts.

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  10. 10 Cents, ever notice that Tokyo and Kyoto have the same two syllables, reversed?  I noticed it right away, and I had to point it out to Ray.

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  11. RB49:
    10 Cents, ever notice that Tokyo and Kyoto have the same two syllables, reversed?  I noticed it right away, and I had to point it out to Ray.

    To or tou in Tokyo is longer by a syllable and means west.

    To in Kyoto is shorter and means town/city.

    The length really matters in Japanese.

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