The Good Ship Weekly Standard Hits a Trumpberg

Looks like the Weekly Standard (or is it Weakly Standard) has hit a bump in its business plan. It appears to be heading for shutdown. Guess that
“all anti-Trump, all the time” model got old fast. It has made Don Surber’s Trumpenfreude list.

But we’ll always have this

guy

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46 thoughts on “The Good Ship Weekly Standard Hits a Trumpberg”

  1. drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    I usually buy the Economist

    I’m surprised anyone around here still reads the Ecommunist. I thought it was strictly for Davos Man. As an aside, Berlusconi was brilliant in coining that nickname for the magazine.

    As mentioned, I find it important to keep tabs on the opposition. I genuinely believe the Economist (unlike many American publications) represents the thoughts of the European community. Doesn’t hurt to step outside one’s parochial boundaries. I read it all and I’m the better informed for it.

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  2. EThompson:

    drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    I usually buy the Economist

    I’m surprised anyone around here still reads the Ecommunist. I thought it was strictly for Davos Man. As an aside, Berlusconi was brilliant in coining that nickname for the magazine.

    As mentioned, I find it important to keep tabs on the opposition. I genuinely believe the Economist (unlike many American publications) represents the thoughts of the European community. Doesn’t hurt to step outside one’s parochial boundaries. I read it all and I’m the better informed for it.

    It’s less “the thoughts of the European community” than it is globalist propaganda. Rather than being representative of what the globalists are thinking, it’s more about what they want the great unwashed to think. In that sense, I revise my previous description as strictly for Davos Man to read strictly for Davos Man wannabees.

    EThompson:
    P.S. I wouldn’t give Berlusconi credit for a damn thing. He’s the Clinton of Italy.

    Regardless of how you feel about Berlusconi, if he coined the term then he coined the term. And if he did, it was on-target.

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  3. EThompson:
    P.S. I wouldn’t give Berlusconi credit for a damn thing. He’s the Clinton of Italy.

    Upon reflection, I’m surprised to see you write that. I think of Berlusconi as being somewhat Trumpesque: successful businessman, Euroskeptic, populist. Clinton was none of those things. The Italian Deep State hated Berlusconi. He was a proto-Trump.

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  4. drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    P.S. I wouldn’t give Berlusconi credit for a damn thing. He’s the Clinton of Italy.

    Upon reflection, I’m surprised to see you write that. I think of Berlusconi as being somewhat Trumpesque: successful businessman, Euroskeptic, populist. Clinton was none of those things. The Italian Deep State hated Berlusconi. He was a proto-Trump.

    Perhaps the Bush funeral had an effect on me today. I didn’t vote for him nor did I approve of his politics, but I admired his integrity. Seeing Obama (socialist) and the Clintons (pathological liars and thieves) sitting there in the Washington Cathedral set me off. I’m still angry at the vision of those two couples listening to the eulogies of an honorable patriot.

    As for Berlusconi’s business acumen, it did not transfer over to the country he was elected to run.

    Despite improvements in the Italian economy under the centre-left government of 1996–2001, by the time Berlusconi regained power there remained features of the Italian economy that were of major concern. Berlusconi himself, in the already mentioned ‘Letter to the Italians’, listed them: high levels of public debt, poor economic growth, public administration inefficiency, high youth unemployment, low investment in research and development (R&D), declining levels of foreign investment, high company taxes and a declining level of competitiveness. Giulio Tremonti, at the time Finance Minister, did not hesitate to politicize the problem in terms of what the centre-right government had inherited from the previous government. It was in part an excuse, and a possible explanation, for economic reform promises which would remain unrealized…

    I do agree he recognized the problems but he didn’t have the chutzpah to fix them. My standards have been raised by our current Leader of the Free World. He’s accomplished more in two years than most presidents do in two terms.

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  5. drlorentz:
    It’s less “the thoughts of the European community” than it is globalist propaganda.

    We’ll have to agree to disagree. Europe is the Western globe and the stats on those citizens on the dole and their hatred for any form of a free market economy are staggering.

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  6. EThompson:

    drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    P.S. I wouldn’t give Berlusconi credit for a damn thing. He’s the Clinton of Italy.

    Upon reflection, I’m surprised to see you write that. I think of Berlusconi as being somewhat Trumpesque: successful businessman, Euroskeptic, populist. Clinton was none of those things. The Italian Deep State hated Berlusconi. He was a proto-Trump.

    Perhaps the Bush funeral had an effect on me today. I didn’t vote for him nor did I approve of his politics, but I admired his integrity. Seeing Obama (socialist) and the Clintons (pathological liars and thieves) sitting there in the Washington Cathedral set me off. I’m still angry at the vision of those two couples listening to the eulogies of an honorable patriot.

    As for Berlusconi’s business acumen, it did not transfer over to the country he was elected to run.

    Despite improvements in the Italian economy under the centre-left government of 1996–2001, by the time Berlusconi regained power there remained features of the Italian economy that were of major concern. Berlusconi himself, in the already mentioned ‘Letter to the Italians’, listed them: high levels of public debt, poor economic growth, public administration inefficiency, high youth unemployment, low investment in research and development (R&D), declining levels of foreign investment, high company taxes and a declining level of competitiveness. Giulio Tremonti, at the time Finance Minister, did not hesitate to politicize the problem in terms of what the centre-right government had inherited from the previous government. It was in part an excuse, and a possible explanation, for economic reform promises which would remain unrealized…

    I do agree he recognized the problems but he didn’t have the chutzpah to fix them. My standards have been raised by our current Leader of the Free World. He’s accomplished more in two years than most presidents do in two terms.

    Did the italicized quote above come from the Ecommunist? If so, that’s hardly an unbiased source given the very public feud Berlusconi had with the magazine. If not, what is the source? It is customary to cite sources, with a link if possible.

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  7. No, it did not. It came from Wikipedia. I suppose I should have quoted the source but I generally do not because I recognize the truth when I look at the statistics. I don’t crave validation from the media or anybody else… just the facts.

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  8. EThompson:
    I do agree [Berlusconi] recognized [Italy’s] problems but he didn’t have the chutzpah to fix them.

    I do not think he lacked chutzpah.   What he lacked was popular support.   Italians all agreed that things needed to change, and voted for him in big numbers.  But Italians did not support actual change that might affect their own families; when it came right down to actual change, they flinched.

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  9. EThompson:

    drlorentz:

    EThompson:
    I usually buy the Economist

    I’m surprised anyone around here still reads the Ecommunist. I thought it was strictly for Davos Man. As an aside, Berlusconi was brilliant in coining that nickname for the magazine.

    As mentioned, I find it important to keep tabs on the opposition. I genuinely believe the Economist (unlike many American publications) represents the thoughts of the European community. Doesn’t hurt to step outside one’s parochial boundaries. I read it all and I’m the better informed for it.

    The Economist is probably not a bad choice for that.   My own preference is, I listen to NPR.

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  10. EThompson:
    No, it did not. It came from Wikipedia. I suppose I should have quoted the source but I generally do not because I recognize the truth when I look at the statistics. I don’t crave validation from the media or anybody else… just the facts.

    Wikipedia is well known for it’s leftist bias. The Wikipedia assessment of a figure like Berlusconi is bound to be negative regardless of the facts.

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  11. MJBubba:
    The Economist is probably not a bad choice for that. My own preference is, I listen to NPR.

    While there’s some overlap, NPR is explicitly leftist while the Economist claims to be free-market oriented. Of course, it has the European bien pensant sensibility, which means it leans left, or more accurately, leans globalist. Keep in mind that the hard Left hates globalism too, though for different reasons. Witness the protests that accompany WTO meetings. They really got frisky in the Battle of Seattle.

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  12. I adore The Economist’s quality of writing.  I cannot stand their frequent leftist cant.  I used to snatch it up when it came out (paying newsstand premium, I might add) until OH, about the time they ran a cover of BUSH RESIGN.

    I’ve bought a few issues since then, but fewer than one every three years, I’d say.

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  13. EThompson:
    I suppose I should have quoted the source but I generally do not because I recognize the truth when I look at the statistics. I don’t crave validation from the media or anybody else… just the facts

    Huh?

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  14. drlorentz:

    MJBubba:
    The Economist is probably not a bad choice for that. My own preference is, I listen to NPR.

    While there’s some overlap, NPR is explicitly leftist while the Economist claims to be free-market oriented. Of course, it has the European bien pensant sensibility, which means it leans left, or more accurately, leans globalist. Keep in mind that the hard Left hates globalism too, though for different reasons. Witness the protests that accompany WTO meetings. They really got frisky in the Battle of Seattle.

    Does the hard left really hate globalism, or, as I think, they demand that globalism happens on their terms?   They are just mad that the wrong people are leading the push for globalism.

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  15. MJBubba:
    Does the hard left really hate globalism, or, as I think, they demand that globalism happens on their terms?   They are just mad that the wrong people are leading the push for globalism.

    Isn’t George Soros one of the biggest globalists around? I thought he was the hard left’s paymaster.

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  16. MJBubba:

    EThompson:
    I do agree [Berlusconi] recognized [Italy’s] problems but he didn’t have the chutzpah to fix them.

    I do not think he lacked chutzpah.   What he lacked was popular support.   Italians all agreed that things needed to change, and voted for him in big numbers.  But Italians did not support actual change that might affect their own families; when it came right down to actual change, they flinched.

    I totally agree but this has not stopped our WH maverick. There are still too many Americans happy to be on the dole and who thoroughly dislike the idea of new factories and new jobs because G-d forbid they may have to actually work for a living. Let’s not fail to mention the lefties who risk losing the power bestowed upon them by the dependent class.

    This is the difference between a career politician and a private sector executive:

    The latter cares only about the future of the country and ignores the polls because he/she can afford to. He/she has no particular special interests. This is a valuable lesson to be learned.

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  17. MJBubba:

    drlorentz:

    MJBubba:
    The Economist is probably not a bad choice for that. My own preference is, I listen to NPR.

    While there’s some overlap, NPR is explicitly leftist while the Economist claims to be free-market oriented. Of course, it has the European bien pensant sensibility, which means it leans left, or more accurately, leans globalist. Keep in mind that the hard Left hates globalism too, though for different reasons. Witness the protests that accompany WTO meetings. They really got frisky in the Battle of Seattle.

    Does the hard left really hate globalism, or, as I think, they demand that globalism happens on their terms?   They are just mad that the wrong people are leading the push for globalism.

    Yes. Distinguish the various flavors of the Left. To some, the Left looks like one big, nasty pustule of hate. I’ll grant the nasty pustule of hate part but not the one part. Every international meeting, from WTO to G20, gets a bunch of lefty loons throwing Molotov cocktails, turning over cars, and generally making a mess. From the Battle of Seattle in 1999 to the G20 meeting this month in Buenos Aires, they’re out there.

    Recall that a major tenet of many leftists is “buy local.” They hate international trade because it exploits the poor, contributes to global warming, and fails to support local artisanal basket weavers. Globalism is not eco-friendly. Soros is not the only kind of leftist there is; he’s a Davos Man,* just like The Ecommunist.

    *a term coined by Samuel Huntington

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  18. Seawriter:

    MJBubba:
    Does the hard left really hate globalism, or, as I think, they demand that globalism happens on their terms?   They are just mad that the wrong people are leading the push for globalism.

    Isn’t George Soros one of the biggest globalists around? I thought he was the hard left’s paymaster.

    See previous comment, above.

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  19. Sometimes I feel some groups are the reverse of the old sports saying, “Winning is the only option.” For them “Losing seems to be the only option.” or maybe “Whining is the only option.”

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  20. 10 Cents:
    Sometimes I feel some groups are the reverse of the old sports saying, “Winning is the only option.” For them “Losing seems to be the only option.” or maybe “Whining is the only option.”

    Winning is only an option?

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