Amazon Streaming Services makes a good acronym

I’m in a foul mood, just a bit.  Long story real short — I am not in the slightest bit interested in joining anybody’s streaming anything, ever.  I pay, I download, I file it in storage I own.

Amazon is making this difficult, and now apparently impossible from the phone / mobile app.  I even went to the desktop in frustration and bought an album, and I still cannot see it from the mobile app.  Google is worse.  Apple’s all-streaming iTunes is one of the things that motivated me to leave the platform — not the only one, but they were early.

Looks like I, as well as everybody else who might, say, go on a ship, or work where you cannot stream, will just hole up in a hillside cave throwing chicken bones at modern people.  And it’s not even about what I cannot do — it’s what I do not want to do.  I do not want to subject ,myself to somebody else’s service, or permission to use a service, to access thing that I have paid for, that I foolishly kept somewhere else.  This makes about as much sense as buying certificates for gold in case the SHTF.  Dumb-ass, if the SHTF, the certificates won’t be honored any more than the toilet paper we call dollars.

Likewise my “rights” to access the content I want after an arbitrary length of time, one bendo-cycle in market terms, has passed, where the  money I paid is long gone, and the license I hold is a liability, not an asset.  Businesses do not survive by accumulating liabilities.  Not one of the streaming “services” has any financial interest at all in allowing you access to something you have already paid for.

Gosh, I’m frustrated.

12+

Users who have liked this post:

  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar
  • avatar

14 thoughts on “Amazon Streaming Services makes a good acronym”

  1. I agree. I think of buying access like getting it in a format that will die. I bought VHS and it is all useless to me now. CD and DVD, though, I can convert to digital and keep forever in formats that are not going away.

    So, if I buy something on Amazon library (movie) that I get to stream, it is more like being on VHS. Anything I really want, I get the DVD, or download the music.

    I have not had a hard time downloading any music I bought on Google Play or Amazon though. Maybe things have changed, it has been a while.

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  2. Bryan G. Stephens:
    I agree. I think of buying access like getting it in a format that will die. I bought VHS and it is all useless to me now. CD and DVD, though, I can convert to digital and keep forever in formats that are not going away.

    So, if I buy something on Amazon library (movie) that I get to stream, it is more like being on VHS. Anything I really want, I get the DVD, or download the music.

    I have not had a hard time downloading any music I bought on Google Play or Amazon though. Maybe things have changed, it has been a while.

    Likewise, beena bit.  And it *is* Christmas Eve, depending on your time zone.  SO I’m trying to be patient.  But it’s right there in my music library, and my phone access is either second-class (by design) second-rate (by accident), or b0rk3n.

    1+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  3. I tell you what — it feels like Amazon is spinning off the mp3 business.  Menu options disappearing — poor connections between what I own and what I can access — I know they don’t WANT to let me have access, but it smells like they are divesting the service and the licenses.  Not sure.  Just a hunch.

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  4. Been futzing around for 2 hours trying to get Texas — The Hush onto my phone before I take a walk.  Screw it.  Here’s the YouTube link.

    Honest to God, these butt-faces are provoking another Napster revolution.

    If this even works — I know Google/YouTube is pushing a new paid YT music thing.  Which maybe I could support, I don’t know.  YouTube never offered me .mp3s before, so I won’t feel double-dealt by them *on this score* despite their multifarious other sins.  Anyway:

    And the video is rendered in magnificent potato-vision.    Comrade.

    1+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  5. As long as it’s available on CD, the best approach (although expensive, especially if you’re paying international shipping charges) is to get the physical medium, rip the content, and then play it with a pure player application that doesn’t access any network anywhere.

    One of the most outrageous things that’s happened in recent years is when the Apple Music (streaming) app took it upon itself in 2016 to delete local copies of music which it believed to be in the streaming library.  This meant that if you had previously purchased and downloaded or bought the CD and ripped your own copy, you lost that copy and were now obliged to pay the streaming subscription to continue to access the music for which you’d paid.

    Furthermore, like most things today, it was tacky and fragile, not based upon some kind of unique identifier for the music comparable to an ISBN for books, but the title, artist, etc. metadata for the track.  In one case, a fan who had made his own recordings of live performances by bands, carefully labelled them, and stored them in his iTunes library, lost them when they were replaced to links to mass-market recordings of the same songs in the Apple Music library.

    When it comes to media, you only own what you have in your physical possession in an open format with no digital rights management, with multiple backups on different media, including off-site in case of fire or bad asteroid day.  As alluded to in the original post, if you need a primer in appropriate paranoia, ask your friendly local gold bug.

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  6. John Walker:
    As long as it’s available on CD, the best approach (although expensive, especially if you’re paying international shipping charges) is to get the physical medium, rip the content, and then play it with a pure player application that doesn’t access any network anywhere.

    One of the most outrageous things that’s happened in recent years is when the Apple Music (streaming) app took it upon itself in 2016 to delete local copies of music which it believed to be in the streaming library.  This meant that if you had previously purchased and downloaded or bought the CD and ripped your own copy, you lost that copy and were now obliged to pay the streaming subscription to continue to access the music for which you’d paid.

    Furthermore, like most things today, it was tacky and fragile, not based upon some kind of unique identifier for the music comparable to an ISBN for books, but the title, artist, etc. metadata for the track.  In one case, a fan who had made his own recordings of live performances by bands, carefully labelled them, and stored them in his iTunes library, lost them when they were replaced to links to mass-market recordings of the same songs in the Apple Music library.

    When it comes to media, you only own what you have in your physical possession in an open format with no digital rights management, with multiple backups on different media, including off-site in case of fire or bad asteroid day.  As alluded to in the original post, if you need a primer in appropriate paranoia, ask your friendly local gold bug.

    Even cloud storage is suspect. I have that, but the raid at home I also have. I’d like my own server someplace remote but I am not that well off.

    1+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
  7. Hear ya.  Just sold my iPod on eBay, which was kinda old, for enough bucks to buy the newest version of the Sony Walkman, the A45, and now iTunes gets jettisoned from my PC.  I’ve found that music, in the form of albums, is about the same price for a CD as MP3.

    I tried FOUR other MP3 players before the Sony, all cheaper save one, and their software sucked.  None of them had tech support or anything remotely resembling a manual, even online.  Apparently Chinese knockoffs without the American or Japanese advantage of actually working.  Sent them all back; all hail Amazon’s return ease.  The Sony worked right out of the box, paired with their free Music Center software.  Bluetooth range is double my old iPod or any of the failed players.  At this point, Sony almost feels American.  Now I can easily listen to Dean Martin get frisky on that cold winter night.  The Sony controls are super.

    Finally, I would never allow Alexa or any other manifestation of Satan into our household.  I’m no Luddite, but c’mon…

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  8. Bryan G. Stephens:
    Even cloud storage is suspect. I have that, but the raid at home I also have. I’d like my own server someplace remote but I am not that well off.

    You don’t need a server.  Just make a backup to DVD or Blu-Ray every now and then before you take a trip and ask a friend to store it in the back of a bookcase or the bottom of a sock drawer.  It’s unlikely you’ll ever need it, but you’ll sleep better knowing it’s there.  I’ve been doing with the DLT and now LTO tapes for more than twenty years.  If you’re concerned with data security, encrypt the backups so they can be read only with a key you control.

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  9. John Walker:

    Bryan G. Stephens:
    Even cloud storage is suspect. I have that, but the raid at home I also have. I’d like my own server someplace remote but I am not that well off.

    You don’t need a server.  Just make a backup to DVD or Blu-Ray every now and then before you take a trip and ask a friend to store it in the back of a bookcase or the bottom of a sock drawer.  It’s unlikely you’ll ever need it, but you’ll sleep better knowing it’s there.  I’ve been doing with the DLT and now LTO tapes for more than twenty years.  If you’re concerned with data security, encrypt the backups so they can be read only with a key you control.

    Well, with the RAID and cloud storage through my best friend who is in IT, I feel pretty good. He, his wife, me and my wife have the decrypt key for the offsite storage so it is pretty secure.

    2+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
  10. John Walker:
    As long as it’s available on CD, the best approach (although expensive, especially if you’re paying international shipping charges) is to get the physical medium, rip the content, and then play it with a pure player application that doesn’t access any network anywhere.

    Yep, and I rip to FLAC, so I can reconstruct a bit-exact CD if necessary.  I extract DVD isos, too, with working menus, though not bit-exact.

    One of the most outrageous things that’s happened in recent years is when the Apple Music (streaming) app took it upon itself in 2016 to delete local copies of music which it believed to be in the streaming library. This meant that if you had previously purchased and downloaded or bought the CD and ripped your own copy, you lost that copy and were now obliged to pay the streaming subscription to continue to access the music for which you’d paid.

    And this is one of my reasons.  The other is that both Amazon and Apple have revoked access to people’s purchases when lawsuits exposed a lack of right to distribute.  If I buy in electronic form, a drm-free copy is going into my archive backups.

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  11. Haakon Dahl:
    Amazon is making this difficult, and now apparently impossible from the phone / mobile app. I even went to the desktop in frustration and bought an album, and I still cannot see it from the mobile app. Google is worse. Apple’s all-streaming iTunes is one of the things that motivated me to leave the platform — not the only one, but they were early.

    This puzzles me. I’ve never streamed anything in iTunes mobile. All the music on my phone is stored locally (8.3 GB). This includes a bunch of CDs I ripped years ago, along with a small amount of stuff I bought in the iTunes store. I’ve even put some tracks from YouTube using one of the many YouTube-to-mp3 sites out there, most recently this one. Sure, the tracks from the iTunes store have DRM protection but they work on all my devices (computer, phones) and are stored locally. This is important to me because streaming works less well when away from home.

    Ironically, the only music I do stream is from Amazon, under my Prime subscription, using their player. Even Amazon allows you to store tracks locally, though they will delete them from your device if they stop being offered on Prime.

    You guys are doing something wrong.

    Edit: Worst case, you can use something like Audio Hijack Pro to store anything you want. As a wise man once said to me, “DRM fails because somewhere, close to the user, the data must be decrypted to be available.”

    0

  12. I agree with the OP, but with an added motivation.  We live in the country – which is great – but have satellite internet which is usage limited before it is throttled – which is awful.  We don’t stream anything.

    I do have Amazon Prime and if we are to download anything, I do it between 3:00 AM and 6:00 AM when usage isn’t metered.  Unfortunately, it seems that Prime is moving away from downloads to streaming.

    Most software developers seem to assume that bandwidth is free.  For me, it isn’t

    3+

    Users who have liked this comment:

    • avatar
    • avatar
    • avatar
  13. John Walker:
    One of the most outrageous things that’s happened in recent years is when the Apple Music (streaming) app took it upon itself in 2016 to delete local copies of music which it believed to be in the streaming library.  This meant that if you had previously purchased and downloaded or bought the CD and ripped your own copy, you lost that copy and were now obliged to pay the streaming subscription to continue to access the music for which you’d paid.

    This is news to me.   I am very new to iPhone.   This is my first smartphone.   I have not yet set up either iCloud or iTunes.   So far I have not stored any music files on my phone.   I am suspicious of Apple, and am thinking of not setting up either service.   I would appreciate thoughts on reasonable alternatives.

    I have avoided Amazon because I am also suspicious of them.

    Is there any reason to be suspicious of Pandora?

    0

Leave a Reply