Academic Dreamers

i know how to solve the “student debt crisis”  for  the future.  Tell your (young) friends.

i just got through shelling out $240K for my kid to attend a 4 year  residential college.  No, no, no brag: it’s just what we, the “deserving wealthy”, do for our kids, so that some other bozo’s kid can attend free.

(Education is already completely socialized, except we’re still at the point where there is a class of people who can afford to carry the rest, kinda the Golden Age of the socialist trajectory.)

But  check out  “Coursera”,  in which her university participates, which makes all the same courses she took available online, complete with quizzes, exams, papers—Free!

‘Cep’n that,  even if you complete all the same coursework online, you can’t  get the diploma.

So we paid $240K for a 4 year,  winter-only,  sleepover camp, plus extra for food.

What  I’m proposing is a “path to the diploma” , aanalogous to the “path to citizenship”for students who do the work online.

Say they pay a one-time fee of $10K or even $20 K for the piece of paper after they’ve completed all the credits.  They’d easily be able to accumulate that much working part time while studying, since you can work online on your own schedule.

like with  “dreamers”, this would be a way for “wonderful, hardworking American kids”  to get their “passport” ,the social marker of the diploma,  without mortgaging  their futures.

whaddya think?

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13 thoughts on “Academic Dreamers”

  1. But, but, but the armchair socialist professors would then have to take a pay cut! Can’t have that, especially since of all tracked expense categories, inflation has been by far the greatest in college tuition.

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  2. Hypatia:
    i just got through shelling out $240K for my kid to attend a 4 year  residential college.  No, no, no brag: it’s just what we, the “deserving wealthy”, do for our kids, so that some other bozo’s kid can attend free.

    My hat’s off to you! My brother finished educating his three kids and spent a cool $850K for USC ($75k annually), Michigan ($60k for out of state tuition) and Wharton ($55k- a bargain). All I can say is Thank God for my parents because to your point, education has been socialized.

    And we wonder why fewer and fewer want kids? Who can afford them?

    P.S. I was totally remiss in missing your most important point:

    … it’s just what we, the “deserving wealthy”, do for our kids, so that some other bozo’s kid can attend free.

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  3. I wonder how this would work out: Instead of handing the 240K to the preachers of Marxism to indoctrinate our children, consider the economics of sending them to an in state school with modest tuition (I paid 80K for my son’s undergrad at Pitt) and putting the other 160K incrementally, beginning as young as possible, into a Roth IRA. I suspect that, in the aggregate, the latter arrangement would come out ahead at retirement time. Of course, everyone will think their offspring would be the outliers who earn fabulous incomes. In that regard, I just saw an article (don’t have time to track it down) saying that the majority of the really big earners are either dropouts or solid ‘C’ students.

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  4. Hypatia:
    Say they pay a one-time fee of $10K or even $20 K for the piece of paper after they’ve completed all the credits.  They’d easily be able to accumulate that much working part time while studying, since you can work online on your own schedule.

    Don’t even bother with this kind of fee.

    Coursera is a great example of the new style of certification.  If you show up at my company’s door with the certificate for this class

    https://www.coursera.org/learn/machine-learning

    and the five related “deep learning” classes, we’ll be happy to talk to you.  In fact, if you’ve got these on your linkedin (which happens almost automatically when you get your certificate) we already have talked to you, since that’s one of the searches our recruiters do!

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  5. civil westman:
    … and putting the other 160K incrementally, beginning as young as possible, into a Roth IRA.

    I like this idea especially in light of the admissions scandals going on. If I did have kids they’d be going to state schools. I inherited a home in Michigan and I’d claim residency and send them all to Ann Arbor, liberalism aside. (You can’t escape it, but rest assured I’d be all over their class itineraries.)

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  6. civil westman:
    But, but, but the armchair socialist professors would then have to take a pay cut! Can’t have that, especially since of all tracked expense categories, inflation has been by far the greatest in college tuition.

    You’re pointing out one of the probable reasons we still have this ridiculous system: it employs a lot of people.  It’s the same thing with insurance, which I personally believe has been the root of all evil ever since we departed from the Lloyds’ catastrophic-losses-only model.  But how could we eliminate it, a huuuuuge industry?

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  7. civil westman:
    Instead of handing the 240K to the preachers of Marxism to indoctrinate our children, consider the economics of sending them to an in state school with modest tuition (I paid 80K for my son’s undergrad at Pitt) and putting the other 160K incrementally, beginning as young as possible, into a Roth IRA.

    This is what I did.  One of the few institutions vaguely surviving California’s governmental onslaught is the UC system.

    Of course, I put the money into MY retirement savings, let the kids save up for their own retirement!

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  8. Knowledge has never been cheaper. (It seems that way to me.) But accreditation costs are going through the roof. Something is amiss. I hope someday that some of these schools will be made as obsolete as buggy makers. They are living in the past and there are better ways to do things.

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  9. In six U.S. states (California, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming) it is possible to be admitted to the bar without attending law school after an apprenticeship with a lawyer or judge and then passing the bar examination.

    This is how credentials should work in all fields.  Professional societies should issue credentials in their fields based upon examinations, interviews, and documentation of work-related experience,  There is no need for the state to get involved.  Credential-issuing bodies would compete with one another for their reputation.  You might, for example, prefer to see a physician certified by the American Medical Association to one with a credential from Dan’s Discount Doctors.

    One potential problem with this idea is that many professional societies are heavily influenced by academics, who would probably be inclined to protect their institutional monopoly on credentials.

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  10. The United States has the best education system in the world — in REGARDS TO EMPLOYMENT OF TEACHERS AND BUREAUCRATS.  To undo the current disaster ONLINE CERTIFICATION AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR TRADITIONAL EDUCATION IS NEEDED TO BYPASS THE MORONS RUNNING THE EDUCATION SYSTEM.  If employers demand certifications (and not diplomas) as many are already starting to do, as well as self assessing because who in their right mind would trust current pedagogical loons, the existing Byzantine college / university campuses will soon have less traffic than a present day Sears !!!

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  11. John Walker:
    In six U.S. states (California, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming) it is possible to be admitted to the bar without attending law school after an apprenticeship with a lawyer or judge and then passing the bar examination.

    This is how credentials should work in all fields.  Professional societies should issue credentials in their fields based upon examinations, interviews, and documentation of work-related experience,  There is no need for the state to get involved.  Credential-issuing bodies would compete with one another for their reputation.  You might, for example, prefer to see a physician certified by the American Medical Association to one with a credential from Dan’s Discount Doctors.

    One potential problem with this idea is that many professional societies are heavily influenced by academics, who would probably be inclined to protect their institutional monopoly on credentials.

    My lawyer, now deceased, passed the bar at 19 after only one year of college. He was a brilliant guy although he married and divorced five times. He joked that after the third date he would just buy the girl a house and get it over with. He took a liking to me and said he would send me bills but that if I wanted never had to pay it and there was never a time when it was due. Of course that made me try to pay it as soon as possible.

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  12. I can envision a system where students learn on line and are tested by their future employers. Students can research a company and receive advice on what the company wants from them and prepare.

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  13. There are online universities which cater to people who work and learn. A sleepover unchaperoned summer camp is about the worst learning environment I could envision.

    As this moves into the future, the key jobs will go to the skilled coders who did not get a diploma, the entrepreneurs who went from welder to construction ceo and such. Our major corporations need H1B visas to get SKILLED college graduates as opposed to the homegrown summer camps snowflakes we pay millions for.

    The only area our system of higher education breeds for is civil service positions on committees that study other committees ad nauseum.

    This will continue as long as we let it….

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