“They had 80 % of the industry.”

The title refers to Hanna-Barbera. I had no idea how much content this animation studio had put out till I saw this video. In the video there is a story of a would be killer of Fred Flintstone. I bet you won’t guess who that was.

(The video is about 20 minutes. For those who were hooked on these cartoons in youth it will be hard to stop watching it.)

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26 thoughts on ““They had 80 % of the industry.””

  1. I had the good fortune of meeting Hanna’s nephew few years ago. Great guy. Wish I could share some stories, but it was awhile ago. Those cartoons reminded me of Saturday mornings growing up in 60s and 70s. I was more though a fan of Tom and Jerry, Droopy Dog, Heckle and Jeckle and of course Davey and Goliath. I thought quality of animation with Hanna-BARBARA was poor

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  2. Wolverine:
    I had the good fortune of meeting Hanna’s nephew few years ago. Great guy. Wish I could share some stories, but it was awhile ago. Those cartoons reminded me of Saturday mornings growing up in 60s and 70s. I was more though a fan of Tom and Jerry, Droopy Dog, Heckle and Jeckle and of course Davey and Goliath. I thought quality of animation with Hanna-BARBARA was poor

    (With a smile) Wolverine, when you talk about poor quality of a person or company it is best to get the name spelled right?

    BTW, welcome to Ratburger.org!

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  3. I don’t spel too good.

    He did talk about the beginnings of the studio. I will try to contact him. I believe I still have his e-mail address.

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  4. Not only is my spelling poor, so is my memory. It is Barbera, not Hanna, whose nephew I met. He is a urologist who works in Brooklyn. I e-mailed him and asked for some anecdotes and memories.

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  5. Wolverine:
    Not only is my spelling poor, so is my memory. It is Barbera, not Hanna, whose nephew I met. He is a urologist who works in Brooklyn. I e-mailed him and asked for some anecdotes and memories.

    I hope this will be a Ratburger Exclusive.  Urologist?! Is that a fortune teller? They read pee leaves, right?

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  6. Tom and Jerry was my favorite. Had a cat that would watch them. He try to catch Jerry on the TV with his paw. The TV show Supernatural did an episode last year with the cast of Scooby Doo. It was pretty funny.

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  7. From 1958 to 1964, they pretty much could do no wrong. After that, there was much that did not succeed other than Scooby Do0, Josey and the Pussycats, and Super Friends a decade later. And I discount Super Friends, because it involved already well known characters.

    Although The Flintstones involved a high episode count, what was truly amazing was that with the other H-B shows they perfected the evergreen. A 20 or so episode run over a season or so, could be watched in syndication many times over by the next 20 years of kids.

    Why did they go from this huge success rate in the early 1960s to well below the Mendoza line in the mid 1970s? Did quality lapse? Was it too hard to compete with the established H-B properties? Third party competition?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_works_produced_by_Hanna-Barbera_Productions#Television_series

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  8. I liked Yogi because he was smarter than the average bear. In the WB world I liked Bugs Bunny. They’re similar: were wise guys who liked to work the angles and outsmart their clueless foils, at least temporarily.

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  9. 1960s cartoons were where I started to appreciate classical music. In addition to all the laughs, I am grateful to them for that.

    My favorite for some reason, was Fractured Fairytales. Maybe because of the classic voice of Edward Everett Horton. (I don’t think they were Hanna-Barbera)

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  10. I liked Huckleberry Hound. It came on about dinner time, and I remember not being able to figure out why it was over by the time we were done eating.

    Johnny Quest was big on Saturday mornings.

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  11. Of the big H-B names, I think I liked Scooby-Doo more than The Flintstones or Jetsons. Even as a 3-year old, I think I found too many faults in Flintstone and Jetson technology. Of the minor shows or sub-shows, I liked Yakky Doodle and Auggie Doggy and Doggy Daddy.

    But, non-H-B shows, Speed Racer and Underdog were preferred as was the Jay Ward sub-show Peabody’s Improbable History.

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  12. I think the Flintstones were my favorite. I like the puns and the guest star appearances in the cartoon. They were the first to do prime time and they did it well. I never made the Honeymooners connection but I see it now.

    I was looking at another program they made called, “Wait Till Your Father Gets Home”. That seems so dated because so many people have no fathers that are coming home.

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  13. Percival:
    I liked Huckleberry Hound. It came on about dinner time, and I remember not being able to figure out why it was over by the time we were done eating.

    Johnny Quest was big on Saturday mornings.

    I liked Johnny Quest too. There were interesting stories. It must have been nice to have a family jet.

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  14. Pencilvania:
    1960s cartoons were where I started to appreciate classical music. In addition to all the laughs, I am grateful to them for that.

    Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd did a version of the Ring Cycle.

    We were present at this performance at the Hollywood Bowl but I’m not responsible for this video. It’s against the rules of the venue to record the performance. Besides, we had better seats. 😉

    June Foray made a brief appearance. She did her voice for Rocky the Flying Squirrel for us. As of 2010, she still had it. She also did Natasha and a bunch of other voices for various toons.

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  15. I was surprised to find out that Hanna and Barbera got their start on MGM’s Tom and Jerry.

    As cartoons go I have a soft spot for the Pink Panther. It is music and the style I like.

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  16. 10 Cents:
    As cartoons go I have a soft spot for the Pink Panther.

    When I was a grad student, one of the lab techs had a son who told the classic Pink Panther joke:

    Q: What did the Pink Panther say when he stepped on an ant?
    A: Dead ant… dead ant… dead ant, dead ant, dead ant.

    The kid was little so he didn’t really understand the joke. He delivered the punch line without singing it to the tune, which made it funnier to the adults.

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  17. drlorentz:

    10 Cents:
    As cartoons go I have a soft spot for the Pink Panther.

    When I was a grad student, one of the lab techs had a son who told the classic Pink Panther joke:

    Q: What did the Pink Panther say when he stepped on an ant?
    A: Dead ant… dead ant… dead ant, dead ant, dead ant.

    The kid was little so he didn’t really understand the joke. He delivered the punch line without singing it to the tune, which made it funnier to the adults.

    I wonder if I would have liked the Pink Panther without the Henry Mancini music.

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