Latin Saying: Pessimus inimicorum genus, laudantes.

Pessimus inimicorum genus, laudantes.

The worst kind of enemies are those who can praise.

Pessimus= worst
inimicorum= enemies
genus= kind
laudantes= those who can praise

What English words do you see in the Latin?

What do you think of enemies who praise?

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12 thoughts on “Latin Saying: Pessimus inimicorum genus, laudantes.”

  1. pessimism, inimical , generic, laud.

    In sporting competition this is common. Donald Trump does not typically praise opponents.

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  2. G.D.:
    I’ll remember that IF you ever give me praise.

    Meliora sunt vulnera diligentis quam fraudulenta oscula odientis.

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  3. 10 Cents:

    G.D.:
    I’ll remember that IF you ever give me praise.

    That’s a big “if.”

     

    Meliora sunt vulnera diligentis quam fraudulenta oscula odientis.

    “Better wounds/hurts from a wut? than false kisses from a hater.”

    Rick Poach approved of Wiktionary so I checked out  diligence there:

    “present participle of diligere(to love, esteem much, literally to choose, select), from di-,dis-(apart)+legere(to choose)”

    “Plate 1 of classical virtues: Diligence. She is holding a whip and spurs, signifying a drive to steadfastly move forward with one’s means.”

    diligence is a stagecoach.  This is a complicated business, as the man said.  Have you ever feared being wounded, or even spoken to with asperity, by a stagecoach?  Neque me.

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  4. Literal translation: The wounds of the one who wants the kisses of the one who hates are better

     

    That’s like a square peg in a round hole….

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  5. G.D.:
    Literal translation: The wounds of the one who wants the kisses of the one who hates are better

     

    That’s like a square peg in a round hole….

    Proverbs  27:6

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  6. Many of the translations of Proverbs 27:6 include the English adjective faithful.  The idea seems to be that “to love, esteem much, literally to choose, select” is extended by translators as “to be faithful to.”  That is a very interesting idea; would you agree?  To choose a friend implies faithfulness to that friend.  A friend is someone to whom to be faithful.

    This reminds me, a little bit, of a saying attributed to Benjamin Franklin:  

    Be civil to all; sociable to many; familiar with few; friend to one; enemy to none.

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  7. jzdro:
    Many of the translations of Proverbs 27:6 include the English adjective faithful.  The idea seems to be that “to love, esteem much, literally to choose, select” is extended by translators as “to be faithful to.”  That is a very interesting idea; would you agree?  To choose a friend implies faithfulness to that friend.  A friend is someone to whom to be faithful.

    This reminds me, a little bit, of a saying attributed to Benjamin Franklin:  

    Be civil to all; sociable to many; familiar with few; friend to one; enemy to none.

    What I like about Latin is seeing a little different view. Trustworthy and faithful are interchangeable but I would have not have connected “diligence” to this.

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  8. 10 Cents:
    What I like about Latin is seeing a little different view. Trustworthy and faithful are interchangeable but I would have not have connected “diligence” to this.

    Me neque.  But then, when we speak of “performing due diligence” in some matter, we mean “acting in fulfillment of  duty; being faithful to a charge.”  Don’t we?

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