”We Will Never Forget!” (But We Will Revise.)

“We will never forget!” was on bumper stickers, T shirts,  coffee mugs in the aftermath of 9/11.

And boy, did we fly the flag!  There was actually a shortage of ‘em!

Sure,  there were a few voices to the effect that we had it coming, but nobody wanted to actually admit  to being in the “Blame America First” camp.

Who could have predicted that, less than 2 decades later, a message from the President of the US, a native New Yorker, quoting that once-universal mantra “we will never forget!”  would be decried as..what: racist, Islamophobist, White Nationalist….fill in the blank.

And not out of the blue, either: Trump,was responding to a speech by an antisemitic Muslim lefty belittling and dismissing the 9/11 attacks!

America, honey!! You awake yet?

This is  what CAIR  and its ilk have done to our country since 9/1, aided and abetted by the likes of Bush 2 and Blair.

Maybe GWB actually thought  Americans were going to start burning Mosques ( it’d have been a lot harder to find one then than now; they have proliferated since 9/11!) and the homes of Muslim Americans.

I don’t think there was ever a danger of that.   Copies of the Koran sold out  in the immediate  aftermath as Americans belatedly sought to “understand” the hatred!  Violent backlash  would not have happened  even if Bush hadn’t spouted that garbage about Islam being a “religion of peace” (Though I reckon most Americans didn’t actually read  the paperback Korans  they bought, or we never  woulda swallowed that pap…)  His motives may have been good,but he set the stage for Muslims to  claim victim status.  They did not waste the opportunity.

Of course this post was triggered (yes in all senses,) by the awful images of the burning spire of Notre Dame.

In 2001, such wanton,  tragic destruction would have been the occasion for near-universal mourning and sympathy, for the city, for Catholics., dare I even say: for the Christian West.  Or at least  by the Christian West.

Not today.

If the crimes of 9/11 had been perpetrated in 4/19, we would  already  be sympathizing with the poor disadvantaged Muslims who were somehow suffering such desperation, such despair, caused of course by America’s policies, that they had no choice really, but  to enroll in that flight school in Florida where they learned to steer but not to land.

No, we will never forget.    But we have allowed what we remember to be manipulated, falsified, and turned against us.

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26 thoughts on “”We Will Never Forget!” (But We Will Revise.)”

  1. Mike LaRoche:
    Islam is the implacable enemy of Christianity and of all Western Civilization.

    Yes.  And you don’t have to do any decoding to get that message.  Our national response  after 9/11 epitomizes  the phrase “tolerant to a fault”.

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  2. Hypatia:
    …garbage about Islam being a “religion of peace” (Though I reckon most Americans didn’t actually read  the paperback Korans  they bought, or we never  woulda swallowed that pap…)

    Many Americans tried to read the Koran but found it to be boring, repetitive and tense.   And, most of all, self-contradictory.   Our elites failed to pass on some key information that is needed in order to read the Koran.

    The Koran is assembled the way scrolls were usually assembled.   The suras are not in chronological order.   They are in order from longest to shortest.   (Which is how the Prophets are organized in the Old Testament; begin with Isaiah, and then end with “The Twelve.”)

    But there is a doctrine of Abrogation in Islamic jurisprudence.   Nearly 80 percent of all Muslims are adherents of some theory of Abrogation.   Abrogation says that the later verses supersede the earlier verses.

    Then it turns out that all the various Schools of Islam agree that the verses of peace are the early verses, while the verses of war and violence are later verses.

    Muslims are happy that westerners do not know how to read the Koran.   Back in the 70s when I was in college, I went to the local Islamic Center to ask if they had a study of the Koran that was available to non-Arabic speaking students.   “No,” they said.   “You have to learn Arabic first.”

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  3. From what I understand, Islam can’t hold a candle to Christianity that is why the nations where it is practiced are so repressive. They fear it.

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  4. MJBubba:

    Hypatia:
    …garbage about Islam being a “religion of peace” (Though I reckon most Americans didn’t actually read  the paperback Korans  they bought, or we never  woulda swallowed that pap…)

    Many Americans tried to read the Koran but found it to be boring, repetitive and tense.   And, most of all, self-contradictory.   Our elites failed to pass on some key information that is needed in order to read the Koran.

    The Koran is assembled the way scrolls were usually assembled.   The suras are not in chronological order.   They are in order from longest to shortest.   (Which is how the Prophets are organized in the Old Testament; begin with Isaiah, and then end with “The Twelve.”)

    But there is a doctrine of Abrogation in Islamic jurisprudence.   Nearly 80 percent of all Muslims are adherents of some theory of Abrogation.   Abrogation says that the later verses supersede the earlier verses.

    Then it turns out that all the various Schools of Islam agree that the verses of peace are the early verses, while the verses of war and violence are later verses.

    Muslims are happy that westerners do not know how to read the Koran.   Back in the 70s when I was in college, I went to the local Islamic Center to ask if they had a study of the Koran that was available to non-Arabic speaking students.   “No,” they said.   “You have to learn Arabic first.”

    I read it. (No, not in Arabic, but c’mon! It is a feature of written language that it can be translated and that it can be decoded; I don’t buy that God -only -speaks -Arabic schtick.)  I was reminded of Hitchens’ comment (via Mark Twain, I think) about the Book of Mormon:  to call it tedious and soporific seems superfluous,  since one of the testaments is actually called The Book Of Ether…..

    I don’t think it’s any worse than the OT though.  Most people have no idea what’s in there, and in my experience are incredulous that some of the stories are really contained therein.  Hee hee, I love an OT neophyte!)

    i also reread the Book Of Revelation in 2001, sobbing in terror at the nightmare images, which I have avoided thinking about ever since my first childhood exposure.   It’s not that they make sense, but they make…sensation.

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  5. I’ll never forget the building of a mosque a corner away from our holy site in NYC. For a while there, they had trouble finding union workers who would participate.

    And I still wince at the presence of an Imam during 9/11 services at the Washington Cathedral.

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  6. 10 Cents:
    From what I understand, Islam can’t hold a candle to Christianity that is why the nations where it is practiced are so repressive. They fear it.

    As a Christian, I think Islam is actively working for the other side. It is the enemy of Christianity.

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  7. Bryan G. Stephens:
    It is the enemy of Christianity.

    It is the enemy of the good and the Quran is a self-indulgent collection of rules to cater to the whims of the prophet muhammad whose name I refuse to capitalize.

    Pedophilia, stoning, abuse of women, hatred for Sunni and Shia, and my favorite: the concept of the caliphate to be achieved by jihadism and suicide bombers to be met in Heaven by 22 vestal virgins. What a recruiting tactic! What a sham!

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  8. Mike, you’re a well educated historian so perhaps you can answer this question:

    How does one single lunatic develop a “religion” of 1.8 billion people that has continued to spread throughout the globe since the year 570?

    Christians constitute 2.2 billion members but have been around since the 1st century AD and inhabit relatively smaller sections of the globe.

    If I was back in college, this would be an interesting thesis indeed.

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  9. EThompson:
    Mike, you’re a well educated historian so perhaps you can answer this question:

    I will let Mike provide his own answers, but here are my replies:

    How does one single lunatic develop a “religion” of 1.8 billion people that has continued to spread throughout the globe since the year 570?

    Through the power of Satan.

    Muhammad was born in 570, I think.  The origin of his religion is often dated to AD 622.

    Christians constitute 2.2 billion members but have been around since the 1st century AD and inhabit relatively smaller sections of the globe.  …

    I think Christianity can easily claim a larger share of the globe.   Even more important is that Muslims are really concentrated into Indonesia, Pakistan, India and Bangla Desh.   Otherwise they form majorities in pretty low density countries.

    Lands that are majority Christian tend to have a more even population density.   But think on the size of Christian Africa and Christian Latin America.

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  10. Hypatia:

    MJBubba:

    Hypatia:
    …garbage about Islam being a “religion of peace” …

    Many Americans tried to read the Koran but found it to be boring, repetitive and tense.   And, most of all, self-contradictory.   Our elites failed to pass on some key information that is needed in order to read the Koran.

    … Abrogation 

    …  “You have to learn Arabic first.”

    I read it. (No, not in Arabic, but c’mon! It is a feature of written language that it can be translated and that it can be decoded; I don’t buy that God -only -speaks -Arabic schtick.)  …

    When you read it, did you have a study guide that indicated which verses were abrogated, and by which verses?   Which of the five commonly available English translations did you read (they differ by staggering distinctions in key places)?   Did you read the Hadith Bukari?

    I don’t think it’s any worse than the OT though.  Most people have no idea what’s in there, and in my experience are incredulous that some of the stories are really contained therein.  Hee hee, I love an OT neophyte!)

    i also reread the Book Of Revelation in 2001, sobbing in terror at the nightmare images, which I have avoided thinking about ever since my first childhood exposure.   It’s not that they make sense, but they make…sensation.

    I have found many low-information Christians who could not answer simple Bible questions.   The Bible is actually straightforward, but it is daunting for neophytes.   A study Bible with good introductions to each book along with footnotes is recommended.

    As for the Old Testament, I may have to write a post.   As for the Revelation, it is consistent with the statements of Jesus and the prophecies of Isaiah, Ezekiel and Daniel.   The end times will be very unpleasant.

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  11. MJBubba:
    Through the power of Satan.

    Wowser! You are one serious dude. I admire that.

    MJBubba:
    I think Christianity can easily claim a larger share of the globe.

    Yes, geographically, but I was referring to sheer population. The highest concentration of Muslims is in India simply because of the 1,350,438,098 people who live there.

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  12. MJBubba:
    I have found many low-information Christians who could not answer simple Bible questions.   The Bible is actually straightforward, but it is daunting for neophytes.   A study Bible with good introductions to each book along with footnotes is recommended. As for the Old Testament, I may have to write a post.

    I’m afraid I would qualify as a low-information Protestant but would enjoy reading a post about the OT. I’ve always enjoyed history and I regard the Bible as providing an analysis of some of the most interesting events in time.

    Have at it!

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  13. EThompson:
    Mike, you’re a well educated historian so perhaps you can answer this question:

    How does one single lunatic develop a “religion” of 1.8 billion people that has continued to spread throughout the globe since the year 570?

    Christians constitute 2.2 billion members but have been around since the 1st century AD and inhabit relatively smaller sections of the globe.

    If I was back in college, this would be an interesting thesis indeed.

    The same way Leftism works.  Tell people that in your system, they get to take other people’s stuff, and they’ll move mountains to keep your system going strong.

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  14. EThompson:
    Mike, you’re a well educated historian so perhaps you can answer this question:

    How does one single lunatic develop a “religion” of 1.8 billion people that has continued to spread throughout the globe since the year 570?

    Short answer: the prophet mohammed (bees piss upon him) was Al Sharpton with better PR.

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  15. EThompson:

    Bryan G. Stephens:
    It is the enemy of Christianity.

    It is the enemy of the good and the Quran is a self-indulgent collection of rules to cater to the whims of the prophet muhammad whose name I refuse to capitalize.

    Pedophilia, stoning, abuse of women, hatred for Sunni and Shia, and my favorite: the concept of the caliphate to be achieved by jihadism and suicide bombers to be met in Heaven by 22 vestal virgins. What a recruiting tactic! What a sham!

    One exception: The Sunni Shia divide is political not religious. The split was over who would be heir to Muhammad. Shia wanted his nephew and Sunnies wanted his closest lieutenant.

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  16. Robert A. McReynolds:

    EThompson:

    Bryan G. Stephens:
    It is the enemy of Christianity.

    It is the enemy of the good and the Quran is a self-indulgent collection of rules to cater to the whims of the prophet muhammad whose name I refuse to capitalize.

    Pedophilia, stoning, abuse of women, hatred for Sunni and Shia, and my favorite: the concept of the caliphate to be achieved by jihadism and suicide bombers to be met in Heaven by 22 vestal virgins. What a recruiting tactic! What a sham!

    One exception: The Sunni Shia divide is political not religious. The split was over who would be heir to Muhammad. Shia wanted his nephew and Sunnies wanted his closest lieutenant.

    I have always considered that divide to be religious not unlike Zionists vs. Hasidim who despise the idea of a Hebrew state before the arrival of the Messiah.

    Extra edition: Jihadism appears to be religious but I think it’s political as well. Remember the prophet was the Genghis Khan of his time.

    I think we’re both right, but what does it matter? The Quran endorses evil actions regardless of motivation. In fact, a legitimate argument could be made that the prophet used religion as a deceptive motivating force.

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