Photo Friday: Stunt Flight

What is this plane?

Instead of working on this, that, or the other thing this morning, I checked out this little mention and slideshow in  a Polish site, The First News.

Here is the article entire:

With warm weather finally settling in Poland, pilot Łukasz Czepiela decided to start off the season by the sea in style – by landing a plane on Sopot pier.

That is admirable brevity.  I do also recommend the slide show.

Sopot, on the Baltic Sea between Gdynia and Gdansk, indeed has a very nice pier, which looks to be 1300-1400 feet in length.

So what sort of airplane is this, and also while we are at it, why would anyone ever eat blue cotton-candy?  or any cotton-candy?  Maybe the pilot did not eat it but just pretended, to demonstrate that he is so cool that cotton-candy could never in a million years detract from his coolness, he can so handle it.  I hope so.

Do Ratburgers have other favorite airplane stunts?  May we see?

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11 thoughts on “Photo Friday: Stunt Flight”

  1. I don’t which plane it is. At first glance it looked like the Spirit of St. Louis. Those front tires are really big so it must be special.

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  2. Damocles:
    I love the bushplane contests.

    Hi Damocles!  I sure am glad to learn about STOL contests.  The bush needs bush pilots, right?

    If that’s in Poland, it might be a Helga!

    Wilga, maybe?  But the Wilga appears not to have struts supporting the wings.

    How about an X-Cub, shown here beginning at 4:05:

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  3. 10 Cents:
    Does that pier normally have those markings or was this done for a stunt for Red Bull?

    For sure a stunt for Red Bull.  The pier was clear.  And who would leave out a “welcome mat” for copycat stunt fliers?

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  4. Juancho E. Yrausquin Airport on the island of Saba in the Netherlands Antillies has the shortest runway of any airport with regularly scheduled commercial flights.  The runway is just 400 metres long, and to make things more interesting, has high hills at one end and a steep cliff falling off to the sea at the other.  Winair operates daily flights to Saba, using Twin Otter and other short takeoff and landing aircraft.

    Here is a video of a landing and takeoff from Saba.

    This is a cockpit vew of of a Winair flight into Saba.  Note the steep approach to avoid terrain at the end of the runway.

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  5. John Walker:
    Juancho E. Yrausquin Airport on the island of Saba in the Netherlands Antillies has the shortest runway of any airport with regularly scheduled commercial flights.  The runway is just 400 metres long, and to make things more interesting, has high hills at one end and a steep cliff falling off to the sea at the other

    I think I could find some reason to not fly into there.

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