Cinco de Ramadan

Today the beginning of Ramadan falls on the fifth of May.   This may send shivers across the Intersectionality world, but I am not a part of that world.   My Intersectionality Score is zero.   But I noticed the calendar, and went looking to see what to expect for Ramadan.   Sure enough, I found a recent kid’s program from an American madrassa.   The Umma Day program was really interesting, and will just make your day for the first day of Ramadan.   Here is a little blurb about the kids’ program at the Muslim American Society Islamic Center of Philadelphia:

young children wearing Palestinian scarves sang: “Glorious steeds call us and lead us [to] the Al-Aqsa Mosque. The blood of martyrs protects us… Take us, oh ships… until we reach our shores and crush the treacherous ones… Flow, oh rivers of martyrs!” A young girl read a poem praising martyrs who sacrificed their lives for Palestine, and she asked: “Will [Jerusalem] be a hotbed for cowards?” Another young girl read: “We will defend [Palestine] with our bodies… We will chop off their heads, and we will liberate the sorrowful and exalted Al-Aqsa Mosque… We will subject them to eternal torture.”

Just a day in the multicultural life of the City of Brotherly Love.

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17 thoughts on “Cinco de Ramadan”

  1. Oh Bubba, just when I was hoping to relax on a Sunday afternoon! However, I will always appreciate and support those who fight to keep the truth alive.

    I think I’ve made my opinions on Islamic society quite clear in the past (especially at Ricochet) and I will continue -at the risk of PC criticism- to discourage its presence here.

    As you know, I will defend religious freedom quite vehemently but not violent cults who use “Allah” as an excuse to commit evil.

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  2. You must be mistaken.  Islam is the “Religion of peace”.  No, see, they’re just talking about an internal  struggle, like if you wanted to stop smoking or something.  Anyway unless you’re reading it in Arabic, kaffir, you cannot begin to comprehend the meaning…how dare you profane the ceremony with your irreligious scrutiny?   Im tellin’ Ilhan Omar! 

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  3. Islam is a counterfeit of the religion of true peace.

    In Islam, you work your way to Allah, and kill infidels until everyone submits.

    In Christianity, God comes to you, and you tell everyone until everyone has heard the Good News.

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  4. On the traditional Roman Rite calendar this is also the memorial of Pope St. Pius V of Lepanto fame. (May 5th is the day we sunk some serious battleships).  It is a memorial at Vespers for those priories observing the traditional Dominican Breviary and Missal.

    Enjoy the day, infidel!

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  5. Mahound speaking:

    ”A voice is in the mountains, in the mountains! And I know/ That voice that shook our palaces four hundred years ago./ It is he that saith not kismet, it is he that knows not Fate, / It is Raymond, it is Richard, it is Godfrey at the gate!/ It is he whose loss is laughter when he counts the wager worth./ Set down your foot upon him that our peace may  rule the Earth!”

    —GK Chesterton, Lepanto

    …didn’t work out for the Ottomans  that time…so mote it be always!

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  6. MJBubba:

    Hypatia:
    GK Chesterton, Lepanto

     

    Vivat Hispania!

    Domino Gloria!

    Don John of Austria

    Has set his people free.

    Fortunately, we have our own “Don John”!

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  7. MJBubba:
    Today the beginning of Ramadan falls on the fifth of May.

    Well, that depends.  Not to be a pedant (hah!), but if you go by Universal Time (or the local time used in Mecca), Ramadan begins on Julian Day 2458609.5, which is May 6, 2019 in the Gregorian calendar.   This is 1440 Ramadan 1 in the Islamic calendar and 5779 Iyyar 1 in the Hebrew calendar.  Much more calendar geek detail awaits you at Calendar Converter.

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  8. John Walker:

    MJBubba:
    Today the beginning of Ramadan falls on the fifth of May.

    Well, that depends.  Not to be a pedant (hah!), but if you go by Universal Time (or the local time used in Mecca), Ramadan begins on Julian Day 2458609.5, which is May 6, 2019 in the Gregorian calendar.   This is 1440 Ramadan 1 in the Islamic calendar and 5779 Iyyar 1 in the Hebrew calendar.  Much more calendar geek detail awaits you at Calendar Converter.

    Couldn’t convert Ramadan.  Didn’t see an option for Mordor Years.

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  9. MJBubba:
    Islam is a counterfeit of the religion of true peace.

    In Islam, you work your way to Allah, and kill infidels until everyone submits.

    In Christianity, God comes to you, and you tell everyone until everyone has heard the Good News.

    Nicely put.

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  10. Phila also is home to the  “Interfaith Center”, which  I had some truck with when my daughter was at Penn.  but I thought the very  name was a double oxymoron: there can really be no converse between faiths, and the enterprise,, necessarily, has got no “center” which can hold.

    That is, not as long as any faith takes the abjurations of its  sacred text seriously.

    Muslims  not living under a Muslim theocracy are living  in the “land of War”  and it is their sacred duty to make war on infidels.  This incident is not an aberration.

    for that matter very few of us Christians are living by taking no thought for the  morrow, doing nothing but preaching the gospel.

    We no longer believe we have to do nothing but live as itinerant begging preachers, sharing all worldly goods with other believers, ministering to the  sick, dying and imprisoned..

    Unless and until Islam reaches the same kind of accommodation, like, it’s okay, you can serve Allah in a secular calling, you don’t really have to spend every day threatening nonbelievers with submission or beheading, this kinda thing will continue and flourish.

    And we should not tolerate it.

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  11. Hypatia:
    Muslims  not living under a Muslim theocracy are living  in the “land of War”  and it is their sacred duty to make war on infidels.  This incident is not an aberration.

    Exactly. The worst part of this observation is that the “theocratic” ones very often aid and abet

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  12. Contrast this with the “Covington kids” incident.

     

    hee hee: imagine if we saw video of the elementary school students in a Catholic school singing about bombing abortion  clinics and shooting up their personnel.  Could the  admin get away with sayin i5 was “just an oversight”…?

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  13. Hypatia:
    Phila also is home to the  “Interfaith Center”, which  I had some truck with when my daughter was at Penn.  but I thought the very  name was a double oxymoron: there can really be no converse between faiths, and the enterprise,, necessarily, has got no “center” which can hold.

    That is, not as long as any faith takes the abjurations of its  sacred text seriously.

    Gee, my church participates in several “interfaith” charities.   Meals on Wheels, an Alzheimers adult day care center, a food pantry, a domestic violence shelter.   (There may be others I am unaware of.)   These are mostly funded and volunteered by Christian churches, but there is a mosque and a Hindu temple in our area and they would be welcome to participate if they chose to.   The volunteers are free to share the Gospel as they go about their work, but the focus of each of these charities is their charitable mission, and we all understand that.   We may disagree strongly about some matters of doctrine, but we set those quarrels aside in order to serve hurting people in our community.

    Muslims  not living under a Muslim theocracy are living  in the “land of War”  and it is their sacred duty to make war on infidels.  This incident is not an aberration.

    for that matter very few of us Christians are living by taking no thought for the  morrow, doing nothing but preaching the gospel.

    We no longer believe we have to do nothing but live as itinerant begging preachers, sharing all worldly goods with other believers, ministering to the  sick, dying and imprisoned..

    Unless and until Islam reaches the same kind of accommodation, like, it’s okay, you can serve Allah in a secular calling, you don’t really have to spend every day threatening nonbelievers with submission or beheading, this kinda thing will continue and flourish.

    And we should not tolerate it.

    I don’t think Christians ever thought that all Christians had to live as itinerant preachers or aid workers.   We have generally thought of our time and our talents as gifts from God, and we are called to give generously, sharing with others as they have need.   We commonly speak of a tithe of our time.   That allows all Christian families to take care of their own needs, and then to spend some time in one or another of the various missions available.   We benefit because it helps us to become the sort of people He wants us to become.

    I have known Muslims who were generous and who gave to community charities, though they seem much less inclined to donate their time.   Muslims generally don’t feel like every one of them needs to take up a weapon and join the jihad.   I am not sure how that works.   I have seen sermons by imams that encouraged all of them to look for little ways to advance the cause of Islam, and it seemed to me that there is a world of mischief in how those “little ways” might be interpreted.   But we are not at war with 1.6 billion Muslims.   We are at war with about 1.6 percent of that, so 2.5 million.   Of those, only about 1.6 percent are actively engaged in murder at any given time.

    Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, Muslims are just fine.

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  14. Far’s I can tell, we’re saying the same thing: people of different faiths can get along just fine!  As long as nobody takes it too seriously.   Or as long as they’re willing to concentrate on their shared humanity.   But you don’t hafta  be religious to do that. These activities aren’t  really “interfaith”, theyre  “extra-faith.

    And just outta curiosity: can you pinpoint the historical date, even approximately, when Christians were supposed to no longer live in Holy poverty, giving all they  had to the Christian community, upon pain of death?  “Tithing” originates with Jacob’s bargain.  And it seems to me  all the great “as for me and my house” stuff comes from the OT. Especially the Book Of Proverbs.  That seems to me to be the latest time in the Bible when people are exhorted to be happy in the material comfort and security  which, with God’s blessing, they have  accumulated through honest industry.

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  15. Hypatia:
    Far’s I can tell, we’re saying the same thing: people of different faiths can get along just fine!  As long as nobody takes it too seriously.

    A certain level of self-discipline and forbearance is required to avoid quarreling when doing charitable works in common.

    Or as long as they’re willing to concentrate on their shared humanity.   But you don’t hafta  be religious to do that. These activities aren’t  really “interfaith”, they’re  “extra-faith.

    But faith is an important component.   All those volunteers are motivated by their faith.   If it weren’t for Christians doing Christian things, there would be very little in the way of charitable works.

    And just outta curiosity: can you pinpoint the historical date, even approximately, when Christians were supposed to no longer live in Holy poverty, giving all they  had to the Christian community, upon pain of death?

    You are clearly thinking of two passages from Acts.   First, from Chapter 4:

    32 Now the full number of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one said that any of the things that belonged to him was his own, but they had everything in common. 33 And with great power the apostles were giving their testimony to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, and great grace was upon them all. 34 There was not a needy person among them, for as many as were owners of lands or houses sold them and brought the proceeds of what was sold 35 and laid it at the apostles’ feet, and it was distributed to each as any had need.

    This is not a requirement.   It is simply a description of how the first Christians in Jerusalem lived.   (Socialism works great when it is voluntary.)

    Also, you must be thinking of Acts chapter 5, which tells the story of a husband and wife who were members of this group.   They held some belongings back, and lied about it, and were struck dead.   The point of the passage seems to be that they thought they could lie to God.   This passage has been puzzling for two thousand years, because they were not required to give their belongings.   Their only sin was telling a lie.   But the lie was to God.

    “Tithing” originates with Jacob’s bargain.  And it seems to me  all the great “as for me and my house” stuff comes from the OT. Especially the Book Of Proverbs.  That seems to me to be the latest time in the Bible when people are exhorted to be happy in the material comfort and security  which, with God’s blessing, they have  accumulated through honest industry.

    The Old Testament is Christian Scripture, also.   Proverbs and Ecclesiastes apply to me.

    The New Testament speaks of comfort.

    Hebrews 13:5  Keep your life free from love of money, and be content with what you have, for he has said, “I will never leave you nor forsake you.”

    1 Timothy 6:6-8  Now there is great gain in godliness with contentment, for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world. But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content.

    1 Peter 3:10  For “Whoever desires to love life and see good days, let him keep his tongue from evil and his lips from speaking deceit.”

    In Philippians, Paul was in house arrest in Rome and received gifts from the congregation at Philippi.   He wrote them a letter:

    Not that I am speaking of being in need, for I have learned in whatever situation I am to be content. 12 I know how to be brought low, and I know how to abound. In any and every circumstance, I have learned the secret of facing plenty and hunger, abundance and need. 13 I can do all things through him who strengthens me. 

    There was never a date when Christians were required to keep their belongings in common.   Paul started lots of little congregations all over Asia Minor and Macedonia and never instructed them that they had to live that way.  The Council of Jerusalem (Acts 15) gave no instruction in this matter.   Early Christians in Antioch, Caesarea Maritima, and Alexandria did not mention this.   After the early Christians fled Jerusalem (in 67 AD), we do not know if they continued to live in a communal community.   I doubt it, because many of them scattered, some to Galilee, some to Antioch and some to Alexandria.

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