Doris Day RIP

Doris Day was rare in that she succeeded in music, movies, and television. She lived to be 97 which in itself is an accomplishment. She is best known for Que Sera Sera.

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17 thoughts on “Doris Day RIP”

  1. Her movies were always a lot of fun to watch particularly those shot of the young, single girl living a glam life in NYC that are partially responsible for my lifelong dream as a kid to move there. My experience was a bit less glamorous to be sure but I had a blast all the same.

    Thanks Doris! You will be missed; thank goodness for reruns.

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  2. 10 Cents:
    She is best known for Que Sera Sera.

    That’s a great song, with a great message for life, but it’s always bothered me that she pronounces it wrong.  She sings «que sera sera» as “kay ser-ah, ser-ah”, but no francophone, anywhere in the world, pronounces «que» as “kay”.   Instead, it’s pronounced exactly as it’s written, as something like “kuh” in English.

    The funny thing is that pronouncing it correctly doesn’t change the rhythm or rhyme of the song at all.  It’s an unnecessary error, which grates upon the ears of anybody who speaks the language the song quotes.

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  3. John Walker:

    10 Cents:
    She is best known for Que Sera Sera.

    That’s a great song, with a great message for life, but it’s always bothered me that she pronounces it wrong.  She sings «que sera sera» as “kay ser-ah, ser-ah”, but no francophone, anywhere in the world, pronounces «que» as “kay”.   Instead, it’s pronounced exactly as it’s written, as something like “kuh” in English.

    The funny thing is that pronouncing it correctly doesn’t change the rhythm or rhyme of the song at all.  It’s an unnecessary error, which grates upon the ears of anybody who speaks the language the song quotes.

    Is it French? I thought it was Spanish.

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  4. From Wiki.

    The saying is always in an English-speaking context, and has no history in Spain, Italy, or France, and in fact is ungrammatical in all three Romance languages.[14] It is composed of Spanish or Italian words superimposed on English syntax. It was evidently formed by a word-for-word mistranslation of English “What will be will be”, merging the free relative pronoun what (= “that which”) with the interrogative what?[15]

    Livingston and Evans had some knowledge of Spanish, and early in their career they worked together as musicians on cruise ships to the Caribbean and South America. Composer Jay Livingston had seen the 1954 Hollywood film The Barefoot Contessa, in which a fictional Italian family has the motto “Che sarà sarà” carved in stone at their ancestral mansion. He immediately wrote it down as a possible song title, and he and lyricist Ray Evans later gave it a Spanish spelling “because there are so many Spanish-speaking people in the world”.[16][17][18]

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  5. 10 Cents:
    Is it French? I thought it was Spanish

    From Wikipedia:

    The saying is always in an English-speaking context, and has no history in Spain, Italy, or France, and in fact is ungrammatical in all three Romance languages. It is composed of Spanish or Italian words superimposed on English syntax. It was evidently formed by a word-for-word mistranslation of English “What will be will be”, merging the free relative pronoun what (= “that which”) with the interrogative what?

    So, basically, it’s Anglophones saying, “it sounds cool and foreign, so go with it.”

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  6. John Walker:

    10 Cents:
    Is it French? I thought it was Spanish

    From Wikipedia:

    The saying is always in an English-speaking context, and has no history in Spain, Italy, or France, and in fact is ungrammatical in all three Romance languages. It is composed of Spanish or Italian words superimposed on English syntax. It was evidently formed by a word-for-word mistranslation of English “What will be will be”, merging the free relative pronoun what (= “that which”) with the interrogative what?

    So, basically, it’s Anglophones saying, “it sounds cool and foreign, so go with it.”

    Hey, English gets mangled in foreign songs so turnaround is faire plait.

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  7. John Walker:
    That’s a great song, with a great message for life, but it’s always bothered me that she pronounces it wrong.  She sings «que sera sera» as “kay ser-ah, ser-ah”, but no francophone, anywhere in the world, pronounces «que» as “kay”.   Instead, it’s pronounced exactly as it’s written, as something like “kuh” in English.

    Umm.. it’s Spanish, not French. Take it from a native speaker, her pronunciation is almost perfect. She does not sing kay; it’s more like keh.  It’s certainly far better than your average gringo, who would make the r‘s hard. The Italian version of the song (che sarà sarà) has a similar pronunciation.

    Que Será, Será

    Both the Spanish-like spelling used by Livingston and Evans and an Italian-like form (“che sarà sarà”) are first documented in the 16th century as an English heraldic motto.

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  8. 10 Cents:
    This was nicely done.

    That was one they likely had in the can for a long time. Perhaps they had to re-record it several times because the first version was in NTSC, the second version in 1080P, and the third version in 4K.

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  9. ctlaw:

    10 Cents:
    This was nicely done.

    That was one they likely had in the can for a long time. Perhaps they had to re-record it several times because the first version was in NTSC, the second version in 1080P, and the third version in 4K.

    With newspapers the writer of the star’s obituary dies first and they just fill in the time of death.

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  10. drlorentz:

    10 Cents:
    This was nicely done.

    The most striking thing about this tribute was that Doris Day was from an era when women were celebrated as women instead of men wannabes. Today’s equivalent? Captain Marvel.

    I always loved her because she was pretty and stylish, had a good job, and tons of chutzpah.

    She was ahead of her time in many respects.

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