It is not ABC but CAB now.

Many of us learned the ABCs of CPR.

  • A- Airway
  • B- Breathing
  • C- Circulation

Maybe you knew this but I did not.

As of 2010, the American Heart Association chose to focus CPR on reducing interruptions to compressions, and has changed the order in its guidelines to Circulation, Airway, Breathing (CAB).[11]

If you see someone in need of CPR the new guidelines are get the heart pumping by pressing on it first.

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4 thoughts on “It is not ABC but CAB now.”

  1. 10 Cents:
    If you see someone in need of CPR the new guidelines are get the heart pumping by pressing on it first.

    Well, that makes sense.  The survival “Rule of Three” holds that you can survive:

    • 3 minutes without breathing (drowning, asphyxiation)
    • 3 hours without shelter in an extreme environment (exposure)
    • 3 days without water (dehydration)
    • 3 weeks without food (starvation)

    (obviously, your kilometrage will vary depending upon your individual health and circumstances).  But you can remain conscious less than three seconds without blood circulation, and ischemic damage begins quickly thereafter.  Oxygenation of the blood isn’t going to help if the blood isn’t circulating in the first place, so it seems entirely reasonable to place top priority on getting the heart going.

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  2. After my husband survived his LAD heart attack, we had to take a CPR class at the local hospital’s cardiac center as they were positive another heart attack would soon occur.   The biggest surprise to me in the training was just how hard, as in seriously hard, you need to ‘push/pump’, as well as how fast and how long.   I remember the Nurse saying to me, “If it happens (cardiac arrest),  don’t worry about hurting him or cracking a rib.    Just push down hard and strong, then a quick relax and keep repeating, down/up, down/up.  She repeatedly told me ‘”That’s too slow; faster, faster!   Stronger. ”   Even in doing a brief practice, it was a work-out.   I just wish she had not mentioned that ‘break a rib’ part, because that was all I could think about after she mentioned it.

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