My Immigration Proposal

I realize that this may fall somewhere between Swift and Wells, but I woud like to consider the implications of a real guest worker program.

I had this thought upon watching a video about South Korea and their “overqualified” workforce, wherein a glut of college-educated workforce (as a demographic stratum) exists beside a crushing shortage of unskilled and low-skill labor.  The country is arguably over-educated.  Sound familiar?  This is the condition that the United States is in if we include only citizens.

So how will South Korea keep the envelopes stuffed and the burgers cooked when everybody in the country expects jobs writing the letters and managing the restaurants — as entry positions?

Obviously, the labor will come from elsewhere — it already does.  Japan and the US have this issue as well, as does all of Europe, and pretty much any country more than a generation removed from a peasant culture.  Japan has hung on the hardest, clinging to its culture (which includes neither guns nor bibles) such that they would rather grow old and die alone than allow their culture to be washed away in a tide of peasant labor.  The United States is rather more closely eyeing Europe’s solution, which is to declare our own culture suspect and dirty, the peasants clean and noble, and prostrate ourselves for enrichment by savages.

South Korea with its insularity even moire virulent than that of japan, and with none of the suppressed war guilt, provides an excellent laboratory for observation.  And of course, there is the possiblity that the United States will actually discover a plan which is both workable and accomplishable.

Assuming for a moment that technology , administration, enforcement, and political will are adequate to the task, I very much like the idea of a guest worker program.  There must be a way to make the case that cheap grapes are the product not only of the destruction of the American culture, but also the exploitation of an underclass.  We should be able to offer a handsome package to guest workers which does not include citizenship, the vote, or permanent residence.  And with fair compensation comes the moral stance to remind people (both the guests and the open-borders crowd) that at the end of the contract comes a trip back home.

Something like this is already on the books in various forms, but it has been lost in the hue and cry led by the open-borders and Death to America crowd.

If there is a way to chip away at the bloc which supports these fifth columnists, perhaps it includes a return to discussions of a stable moderate position.

Aw, who am I kidding?  Seal the border!  Bring on the war!  You know why?  Because any reasonable approach will only be co-opted in our thoroughly Marxified condition.  There is no good deed for which we will not be punished, no accepting stance which will not be called offensive, no compromise position which will not become an unacceptable affront the moment we step back to the compromise.  Perhaps it is not too late for South Korea and Japan to preserve their cultures and very peoples without a fight.  Western Europe is lost, and the United States will not be salvaged without a war.

Thanks, Obama!  We have been fundamentally transformed.

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12 thoughts on “My Immigration Proposal”

  1. An over educated barrista can learn to weld in less than a year. They can become roofers, backhoe drivers and more. If they are good, they can learn and start their own firm.

    All we did was denigrate working in the physical world and move generations into the least biologically sustaining , life sucking environment ever devised, the cubicle.

    Yesterday I watch a backhoe driver manage a computer controlled, GPS driven excavator dig a foundation faster than the best old timer on the site. It was perfect to plan.

    He also got to swear loudly in a way that cleansed the soul and enjoy the women who walked by.

    We have created a self imposed shortage by demeaning jobs which require skill and precision, where fudging with weasel words does not bail your arse out.

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  2. I recently read _Shop Class as Soulcraft_ by Matthew Crawford, which leans a little further left than I would like, but which easily pays its way in insight and affirmation of the virtuous life measured in production of things through interacting with the real world.

    Wonderful book.

    He makes the point that there is more creativity, craftsmanship (he doesn’t like that term) and intellectual engagement in diagnising a repairing an old engine than in a year of supposedly creative and intellectual white-collar jobs, most of which constitute just one more segment of the self-inflating employment centipede, where all agree not to call BS on each other, lest the accusation come home — because the accusation will stick.

    Nobody can argue with a motor than runs much better than it did.

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  3. Haakon Dahl:
    I had this thought upon watching a video about South Korea and their “overqualified” workforce, wherein a glut of college-educated workforce (as a demographic stratum) exists beside a crushing shortage of unskilled and low-skill labor.  The country is arguably over-educated.  Sound familiar?  This is the condition that the United States is in if we include only citizens.  [Emphasis mine]

    Is this actually the case?  According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of May 2015, “21.3 Percent of U.S. Population Participates in Government Assistance Programs Each Month”.  This is for the population as a whole: for blacks, the rate was 41.6%, and for Hispanics 36.4%.  Now, almost by definition, unskilled and low-skilled labour means jobs that pretty much any able-bodied person (or sufficiently able for the nature of the work) can perform without extensive training.  After subtracting out children, the elderly, and disabled, these numbers on government assistance still seem to leave a lot of adults who are not earning their livings by working, or at least sufficiently to pay their way without transfer payments from others.

    Why, then, should the U.S. import unskilled and low-skilled labour from other countries, on any basis, while there are citizens and legal residents already in the country who are not earning enough by working to avoid government handouts?

    Second, where is the evidence of this “crushing shortage”?  Which industries are being “crushed”?  What essential work lies undone for lack of un- and low-skilled hands to do it?  Or is the problem that employers who use such labour aren’t willing to pay their workers enough to attract citizens and legal residents to fill the positions, given the competition of government assistance which doesn’t require working at all?

    Because any reasonable approach will only be co-opted in our thoroughly Marxified condition.  There is no good deed for which we will not be punished, no accepting stance which will not be called offensive, no compromise position which will not become an unacceptable affront the moment we step back to the compromise.

    Precisely—the whole “unskilled labour shortage” and “jobs Americans won’t do” is a stalking horse for an agenda of importing a compliant replacement for those recalcitrant legacy citizens who aren’t on board with the slaver agenda.  There’s no way they’re going home: they’re going to be voting (can’t have “second class people”, you know), having U.S. citizen kids, and before long, voting legally for the slavers.

    Guest worker programs can work well—Switzerland has been doing it for fifty years, and it’s a good deal for the country and the workers.  The country gets the labour, both permanent and seasonal (mostly in the hospitality industry) it needs, and the workers, originally from the south of Europe and increasingly from the east, earn between 40% more and twice what they would at home and can either remit funds to their families or build up a nest egg they can take home at retirement and live in luxury in their low-cost-of-living homelands.  But this only works because there aren’t politicians who want to replace the native population with new citizen/voters.  This is not the case in the U.S.

    Finally, where did the idea come from that people who get worthless credentials in bogus subjects of “higher education” are somehow entitled to well-paying make-work white collar jobs?  If they aren’t employable with their “college” skills, why shouldn’t they learn to work with their hands in honest, productive jobs, rather than bringing in people from other countries to do that work?  Finally, note that it is these low- and medium-level clerical white-collar jobs which are going to fall to automation well before trades such as plumbers, electricians, roofers, masons, welders, machinists, and heavy machine operators.

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  4. Who are you kidding, indeed.  Can you name a country where a guest worker program has ever worked as intended?

    I think it’s because, y’know, the guest workers are people, not robots.  They see the everybody in the host country living better than they did at home,  and living better  than the guest workers do in the host society. And also, being  human, they breed.

    Importation of guest workers, like introduction of non-native flora and fauna to counteract some perceived natural imbalance,  is always the genesis of a burgeoning invasion which cannot be controlled. 

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  5. Hypatia:
    And also, being  human, they breed.

    This is only a problem for countries which have adopted the suicidal practice of birthright citizenship, or jus soli.  This is mostly a Western Hemisphere thing, since those countries were traditionally separated by oceans from the source of their primary sources of immigrants.

    Jus soli around the world

    Dark blue is general (with some restrictions, usually excluding illegal aliens and tourists) jus soli, medium blue is restricted jus soli (often requiring at least one citizen parent), and light blue is countries which once had jus soli but have abolished it.  Only the U.S. and Canada have completely unrestricted jus soli and grant citizenship to children of illegal aliens and tourists.

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  6. Children of Germany’s Turkish gastarbiters  didn’t get birthright German citizenship.  But there they were, in the population.  And when Kohl tried to get ‘em out, there was a big outcry—nothing like the magnitude there would be today, of course.

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  7. John Walker:

    Hypatia:
    And also, being  human, they breed.

    This is only a problem for countries which have adopted the suicidal practice of birthright citizenship, or jus soli.  This is mostly a Western Hemisphere thing, since those countries were traditionally separated by oceans from the source of their primary sources of immigrants.

    Jus soli around the world

    Dark blue is general (with some restrictions, usually excluding illegal aliens and tourists) jus soli, medium blue is restricted jus soli (often requiring at least one citizen parent), and light blue is countries which once had jus soli but have abolished it.  Only the U.S. and Canada have completely unrestricted jus soli and grant citizenship to children of illegal aliens and tourists.

    Thanks for this.  Yes, birthright citizenship has got to go.  It is judicially-created  law and it can be judicially abolished.

    The 14th Amendment (1868) qualifies citizenship by requiring that the person be “subject to the jurisdiction” of the US.  These words cannot be regarded as mere surplusage.  Furthermore, there’s no mystery about why it was enacted: to protect the freed slaves and their progeny.

    The 5th Amendment (1791) already  guaranteed due process of law to all “persons”, citizens or not, born here or not.People who are here in derogation,rather than recognition, of our laws are not”subject to”our jurisdiction, any more than diplomats or invading soldiers and any children they may bear on our soil.

    And— are even tourists excluded today?  I have read that Chinese women are flying over here 9 months pregnant to give birth to a tiny quisling,  to be raised in a enemy culture, who can then return at 18 and claim full  US citizenship. An army of Manchurian  candidates.

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  8. Hypatia:
    And— are even tourists excluded today?

    No, not in the U.S. and Canada.  It’s called “birth tourism”, and it’s a thing, particularly among wealthy families in China and third world countries.  The newly-born U.S. citizen can, upon reaching adulthood, bring in the whole family from the Old Country through “family reunification”.

    It is a tremendous racket, and nobody is doing anything about it.

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  9. Ann Coulter has  a great column up today.  Our country is actually much worse off than Europe in terms of cultural/ethnic displacement.

    I hate the fact that she has turned on Trump—but on  the problem of illegal immigration,  unfortunately,  we have to admit that the problem has gotten hundreds of times worse since he took office.  (That’s after a brief period, immediately following the election when it declined by 90%—until illegals and their facilitators realized his party didn’t have his back.)

    And I got my second suspension Elsewhere for (according to them) alluding to the “fruitcake theory” of white genocide.  But look at the sources Ann quotes.

    What else would you call this determination  to eliminate my race?

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  10. Haakon Dahl:
    I had this thought upon watching a video about South Korea and their “overqualified” workforce, wherein a glut of college-educated workforce (as a demographic stratum) exists beside a crushing shortage of unskilled and low-skill labor.  The country is arguably over-educated.  Sound familiar?  This is the condition that the United States is in if we include only citizens.

    I am all for passing out visas to “overqualified” South Koreans because I know from traveling in that country that they will appreciate the opportunity, work hard and offset some of the brain drain we have suffered here.

    As for low-skill jobs in America, they were designed for high school and college kids to learn the ropes, get solid working experience and some good recommendations after they graduate. Oddly enough, parents don’t encourage their kids to do this as mine did; apparently Habitat for Humanity and Gap Year adventures are considered ‘de rigueur.’

    Not so. I bussed and waited tables for many of my teenage years, socked away some cash and learned how to interview effectively. I got a job in two seconds after college; graduated in May and reported for a great entry level job in NYC on July 1.

    Parents are not guiding their children effectively.

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