Once again, Texas steps in to save the Free World

You’re welcome Free World, we’re always happy to oblige!

First rare earth processing facility outside of China to be built in Texas.

Summary via Instapundit’s comment section:

OPEC: “We have the world in our grasp with our control of OIL!”
Texas: “Hey look at this basin chock full of oil gas we just happen to have here”

China: “We will size control of the world by limiting these RARE EARTHS we are in control of!”
Texas: “Well shucks, turns out all our least desirable dirt is just full of those Rare Earth things!”

https://www.foxbusiness.com/industrials/first-rare-earth-processing-facility-outside-of-china-to-be-built-in-texas
https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/332096/

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7 thoughts on “Once again, Texas steps in to save the Free World”

  1. 10 Cents:

    Damocles:
    China: “We will size control of the world by limiting these RARE EARTHS we are in control of!”

    I guess one “size” fits all in China.

    It would, if it weren’t for the heroic state of Texas!

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  2. In another blow for freedom, Texas governor Greg Abbott has just signed a bill banning red light cameras in Texas.  Some of these municipal revenue enhancers may remain for a few years because the bill contains a grandfather clause which allows cities that have contracts with operators of these cameras to remain in force until they expire.

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  3. John Walker:
    In another blow for freedom, Texas governor Greg Abbott has just signed a bill banning red light cameras in Texas.  Some of these municipal revenue enhancers may remain for a few years because the bill contains a grandfather clause which allows cities that have contracts with operators of these cameras to remain in force until they expire.

    That is awesome news!! Now if it just wasn’t so bloody hot. I would love to move back home but for the damned climate.

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  4. The thing with rare earth elements is not so much that they are rare, just that they are very diffused and messy to extract.  When China got into the business, they didn’t need to follow any pollution regulations, so their prices could be about 25% of domestic production which had EPA regulations.  That helped push US companies out of the market.  There is a very interesting article on the ChinaLaw blog https://www.chinalawblog.com/ which goes into some detail on this.  The premise is that China’s position in the market is a sign of weakness and not strength.

    Here is a quote from it:

    China takes the pollution, low wages and health risks and keeps that in China. China then exports the resulting product at a fantastically low price to foreign high tech companies who reap the benefit. The real value of rare earths lies in the downstream use of rare earth minerals in the high tech production process. This technology remains almost entirely in the hands of foreign companies. Very little has been transferred to China. It is the usual story: China does the dirty work, takes the environmental and labor consequences and reaps no reward either in terms of profit or in terms of technological advancement.

    This is hardly a sign of strength. It is an indicator of incredible weakness.

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