13 thoughts on “Monday Meals 19-6-17: Edamame”

  1. When I first had Edamame as a side dish in a restaurant, I had no idea how to eat them (thanks for the info) and thought they were pretty darn stringy.

    If they are boiled or steamed and salted, are they like boiled peanuts?  Those seem to be a localized dish in the south, so you might not have come across them.

    I can remember sitting on the roof of my grandmother’s car at the drive in and eating them, throwing the shells on the ground.  That was in South Carolina.  My aunt would make them when we went to her place near Myrtle Beach.  You can buy them by the bag at local stands in South Carolina.

    On the other hand, my son and I used to ride the “Peanut Century”.  This was a Century (100 mile) bicycle ride through Southern Virginia and just the top of North Carolina.  The day before, they held the “Peanut Ride” for families.  It was a 15 mile ride through all the local peanut farms and each farm had a wide variety of peanut based foods.  I asked at each stop if they had any boiled peanuts and no one even knew what they were.

    I’ll have to try Edamame again.

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  2. WillowSpring:
    When I first had Edamame as a side dish in a restaurant, I had no idea how to eat them (thanks for the info) and thought they were pretty darn stringy.

    If they are boiled or steamed and salted, are they like boiled peanuts?  Those seem to be a localized dish in the south, so you might not have come across them.

    I can remember sitting on the roof of my grandmother’s car at the drive in and eating them, throwing the shells on the ground.  That was in South Carolina.  My aunt would make them when we went to her place near Myrtle Beach.  You can buy them by the bag at local stands in South Carolina.

    On the other hand, my son and I used to ride the “Peanut Century”.  This was a Century (100 mile) bicycle ride through Southern Virginia and just the top of North Carolina.  The day before, they held the “Peanut Ride” for families.  It was a 15 mile ride through all the local peanut farms and each farm had a wide variety of peanut based foods.  I asked at each stop if they had any boiled peanuts and no one even knew what they were.

    I’ll have to try Edamame again.

    I have never had boiled peanuts so I can’t tell you.

    Wonderful story! Did you keep up the bike riding later in life?

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  3. My sister introduced me to Edamame when she took me and a group of her friends out to Japanese food before her wedding. The authentic sushi took some getting used to; the edamame, however, was an instant hit for me.

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  4. 10 Cents:
    I have bought the frozen ones since they aren’t in season yet.

    They are tasty snacks. They seem to be in season around here; I saw some in the store last weekend.

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  5. boiled peanuts

    I tried some again last fall when we were in South Carolina.   foo.

    Boiled peanuts is one of those regional foods like poke sallet and chitlins.   They are poor peoples food.   Boiled peanuts is something to eat when there ain’t much else and your kids are hungry.   You boil them in the spring because you don’t trust last fall’s peanuts to be mold-free, and the mold that grows on peanuts can make you really sick.

    It has been a long time since I was so hard up that I had to eat real poor peoples’ food.

    We ate poke sallet and creasy greens because the spinach could be sold for real money.   I fail to understand how common poor peoples’ food becomes a must-have for the well-to-do when they go back home.   (I am talking about folk who were never so hard up as to have to eat those foods regularly.)

    (Pardon me, 10 Cents, for running off on a tangent.)

    Soybeans was something I never encountered until I was in college.   As beans go, soybeans are pretty good, and versatile.

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  6. MJBubba:
    boiled peanuts

    I tried some again last fall when we were in South Carolina.   foo.

    Boiled peanuts is one of those regional foods like poke sallet and chitlins.   They are poor peoples food.   Boiled peanuts is something to eat when there ain’t much else and your kids are hungry.   You boil them in the spring because you don’t trust last fall’s peanuts to be mold-free, and the mold that grows on peanuts can make you really sick.

    It has been a long time since I was so hard up that I had to eat real poor peoples’ food.

    We ate poke sallet and creasy greens because the spinach could be sold for real money.   I fail to understand how common poor peoples’ food becomes a must-have for the well-to-do when they go back home.   (I am talking about folk who were never so hard up as to have to eat those foods regularly.)

    (Pardon me, 10 Cents, for running off on a tangent.)

    Soybeans was something I never encountered until I was in college.   As beans go, soybeans are pretty good, and versatile.

    Bubba, it depends how things are made. I bet boiled peanuts can be made well.

    This reminds me of a story my Japanese father-in-law told me. When he was young he had to swim a long distance. What he and he friends would do is have a bag of beans. The beans would soften up in the salt water and the salt flavored them so he had a snack in the middle of his swim. Kind of a poor man’s trail snack.

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  7. 10 Cents:

    EThompson:
    Eat them three times a week with dinner. Steam with olive oil and seasoning. Love!

    Is this at a restaurant or at home?

    Home. Hard to find in a restaurant. Most diners don’t quite know how to eat them. 🙂

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  8. 10 Cents

    10 Cents:
    Wonderful story! Did you keep up the bike riding later in life?

    I did about 15 of the annual local centuries mostly by myself and several others with my older son.  We also did a ride on the C&O canal (about 180 miles) with camping along the way.

    The odd thing is that the local (Reston, Va) century looped out to the mountains and passed about 200 yards from where I live now.  Once we moved out here, I was too busy fixing up things to ride it again.  Most of the loops around here would include lots of gravel roads, so I got a “Mountain Bike” for that.  Now a days, I have neck problems, so I don’t think the road bike with its stretched out posture is for me.  I will probably get the mountain bike out for some short rides.

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  9. MJBubba:
    I tried some again last fall when we were in South Carolina.   foo.

    They are definitely an acquired taste.  My wife can’t stand their taste or  smell.  For me, it probably comes from the good times I associate with them.

    As for the other ‘poor folks’ food, even though I spent a lot of time in the south and my parents were both from there, I never had any.  Things like Collard Greens are a total mystery.  Same with Chitlins – even though my grandparents raised and slaughtered their own hogs.

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