Book Review: Diabolical

Milo Yiannopoulos has a well-deserved and hard-earned reputation as a controversialist, inciter of outrage, and offender of all the right people. His acid wit and mockery of those amply deserving it causes some to dismiss what he says when he’s deadly serious about something, as he is in this impassioned book about the deep corruption in the Roman Catholic church and its seeming abandonment of its historic mission as a bastion of the Christian values which made the West the West. It is an earnest plea for a new religious revival, from the bottom up, to rid the Church of its ageing, social justice indoctrinated hierarchy which, if not entirely homosexual, has tolerated widespread infiltration of the priesthood by sexually active homosexual men who have indulged their attraction to underage (but almost always post-pubescent) boys, and has been complicit in covering up these scandals and allowing egregious offenders to escape discipline and continue their predatory behaviour for many years.

Ever since emerging as a public figure, Yiannopoulos has had a target on his back. A young, handsome (he may prefer “fabulous”), literate, well-spoken, quick-witted, funny, flaming homosexual, Roman Catholic, libertarian-conservative, pro-Brexit, pro-Trump, prolific author and speaker who can fill auditoriums on college campuses and simultaneously entertain and educate his audiences, willing to debate the most vociferous of opponents, and who has the slaver Left’s number and is aware of their vulnerability just at what they imagined was the moment of triumph, is the stuff of nightmares to those who count on ignorant legions of dim followers capable of little more than chanting rhyming slogans and littering. He had to be silenced, and to a large extent, he has been. But, like the Terminator, he’s back, and he’s aiming higher: for the Vatican.

It was a remarkable judo throw the slavers and their media accomplices on the left and “respectable right” used to rid themselves of this turbulent pest. The virtuosos of victimology managed to use the author’s having been a victim of clerical sexual abuse, and spoken candidly about it, to effectively de-platform, de-monetise, disemploy, and silence him in the public sphere by proclaiming him a defender of pædophilia (which has nothing to do with the phenomenon he was discussing and of which he was a victim: homosexual exploitation of post-pubescent boys).

The author devotes a chapter to his personal experience and how it paralleled that of others. At the same time, he draws a distinction between what happened to him and the rampant homosexuality in some seminaries and serial abuse by prelates in positions of authority and its being condoned and covered up by the hierarchy. He traces the blame all the way to the current Pope, whose collectivist and social justice credentials were apparent to everybody before his selection. Regrettably, he concludes, Catholics must simply wait for the Pope to die or retire, while laying the ground for a revival and restoration of the faith which will drive the choice of his successor.

Other chapters discuss the corrosive influence of so-called “feminism” on the Church and how it has corrupted what was once a manly warrior creed that rolled back the scourge of Islam when it threatened civilisation in Europe and is needed now more than ever after politicians seemingly bent on societal suicide have opened the gates to the invaders; how utterly useless and clueless the legacy media are in covering anything relating to religion (a New York Times reporter asked First Things editor Fr Richard John Neuhaus what he made of the fact that the newly elected pope was “also” going to be named the bishop of Rome); and how the rejection and collapse of Christianity as a pillar of the West risks its replacement with race as the central identity of the culture.

The final chapter quotes Chesterton (from Heretics, 1905),

Everything else in the modern world is of Christian origin, even everything that seems most anti-Christian. The French Revolution is of Christian origin. The newspaper is of Christian origin. The anarchists are of Christian origin. Physical science is of Christian origin. The attack on Christianity is of Christian origin. There is one thing, and one thing only, in existence at the present day which can in any sense accurately be said to be of pagan origin, and that is Christianity.

Much more is at stake than one sect (albeit the largest) of Christianity. The infiltration, subversion, and overt attacks on the Roman Catholic church are an assault upon an institution which has been central to Western civilisation for two millennia. If it falls, and it is falling, in large part due to self-inflicted wounds, the forces of darkness will be coming for the smaller targets next. Whatever your religion, or whether you have one or not, collapse of one of the three pillars of our cultural identity is something to worry about and work to prevent. In the author’s words, “What few on the political Right have grasped is that the most important component in this trifecta isn’t capitalism, or even democracy, but Christianity.” With all three under assault from all sides, this book makes an eloquent argument to secular free marketeers and champions of consensual government not to ignore the cultural substrate which allowed both to emerge and flourish.

Yiannopoulos, Milo. Diabolical. New York: Bombardier Books, 2018. ISBN 978-1-64293-163-1.

Here is a one hour interview with the author by Michael Voris of Church Militant.

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Author: John Walker

Founder of Ratburger.org, Autodesk, Inc., and Marinchip Systems. Author of The Hacker's Diet. Creator of www.fourmilab.ch.

39 thoughts on “Book Review: Diabolical

  1. The Catholic church effed him, now he’s effin’ the church.  Love it!

    I just don’t know that Catholicism is as important in the world as Catholics think.  I think a lot of people  still think of Central and South America  as strongholds of the old Spanish mission style Catholicism, ( Even Mexico: guess they never read The Power and The Glory..).  Lemme tell you that in Guatemala, which I had the misfortune to visit a few years ago, evangelical Christianity is much, much bigger and hotter.  On Saturday and Sunday nights in the hamlet of Santiago Atitlan, every street corner had at least one such congregation with extremely loud nouveau Christian music blaring into the streets, and through the windows we could see frenetic sacred dancing with gossamer ecclesiastical banners.  The services were hours long, reported my daughter who was dragooned into attending with the local family she was living with in connection with her college research project.   Nuh-uh, these people are not priest-ridden.   I agree Rome is a sewer, But I think a lot of Christians in the world have already moved away into alternative— I won’t say more modern—systems.

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  2. Hypatia:
    I agree Rome is a sewer, But I think a lot of Christians in the world have already moved away into alternative— I won’t say more modern—systems.

    And they have for decades. I have numerous Catholic friends who have deserted the church because they believe it has deserted them. As one good friend said to me years ago: “I suffered through 17 yrs of parochial school with terrorizing nuns and some physical abuse (for girls- the infamous knuckle rapping).

    On the other hand, a generation later, my niece and nephews attended parochial schools and got a very sound, classical education and all got into excellent colleges and flourished. (In other words, they all have good jobs now and nobody is back home living in the basement.)

    As a born Protestant turned secular, I’m always interested to hear opinions on Judeo-Christian religions because I’m not exactly a Biblical scholar.

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  3. Really interesting interview, I listened to it all. I agree with him that the church needs to clean house thoroughly. I frequently note that any new priest-abuse allegations in the news gloss over the sex of the victims, and I suspect it’s not because they are sparing the victims. It’s because the media does not want it to become obvious that it is almost always boys that are abused, which hangs a lantern on the problem of homosexuality in the clergy.

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  4. Pedophile priests and their enablers deserve the firing squad. And I say that as a lifelong Catholic. Time to clean house and make the rubble bounce.

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  5. Mike LaRoche:
    Also, time to purge all anti-American traitors from the Church, such as this guy. *spit*

    I tread lightly here because I am not Catholic but I think you should write a post about Pope Francis. He is no Jean Paul II who I admired greatly: handsome, athletic, and a Resistance fighter.

    I went out of my way to visit the palace where this good man lived in Krakow.

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  6. Mike LaRoche:
    Pedophile priests and their enablers deserve the firing squad. And I say that as a lifelong Catholic. Time to clean house and make the rubble bounce.

    “Pedophile priests” is a mass media label intended to obfuscate the problem.   It was coined by the Boston paper that broke the story in 2002.   For over 15 years mass media has been using the term to make Americans think that the Catholic clergy is rife with pedophiles.

    Per Pencilvania’s comment #5, the problem is homosexual priests.   Remember those hundreds of “pedophile” cases unearthed last July by the Atty General of Pennsylvania?   That was a total of records for a century for the entire state.   Only a couple of dozen could accurately be called cases of pedophilia.   The rest of the cases involved victims who were boys ages 13 – 17 at the time.   The perpetrators were mostly dead by the time the report came out last year, with only a couple of dozen of those cases, involving fewer than ten priests, from this century.

    The real scandal was the way bishops had covered up for homosexual priests who had preyed on young boys.   There is still a reckoning for the Church of Rome, which is still hiding and obscuring the problems.   Pope Francis’s famous conference this past February was designed to take advantage of pro-homosexual mass media by developing new measures aimed at pedophilia, which is clearly not the real problem.

    The whole mess with ex-Cardinal McCarrick was the way he had cruised among the seminarians for decades, driving some out of the priesthood in order to escape his foul advances.   Many priests and other bishops knew about his proclivities but kept it quiet.   Last year Archbishop Viganò revealed that Cardinal Wuerl and Pope Francis knew all about McCarrick but rehabilitated him anyway.

    The whole situation is a scandal, in particular it is an ecclesial scandal according to canon law.

    Milo may very well be on target, but he will not get a friendly hearing from anyone within the Church of Rome who has standing or position to be able to do anything about the problem.

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  7. Hypatia:
    I just don’t know that Catholicism is as important in the world as Catholics think.

    A third of the world is Christian.   Half of all Christians are in fellowship with the Church of Rome.

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  8. Mike LaRoche:
    Pedophile priests and their enablers deserve the firing squad. And I say that as a lifelong Catholic. Time to clean house and make the rubble bounce.

    We’ve discussed this several times before so I know you will not be shocked/offended at my question:

    Judeo-Protestant rabbis and ministers serve their congregations well as married men and women with children. This is a natural and positive element of human life.

    What non-Catholics will never understand is why your church forces priests to live  a chaste and patriarchal life and then wonders why homosexuality/pedophilia occurs?

    It doesn’t make sense to me. The rules and regulations of the Catholic church appear (to an outsider) as an open invitation to perverts who are not permitted to live as nature intended.

    You can fully commit to your religious values and enjoy a family as well. In fact, I would imagine a priest would be more effective in the confessional if he could relate to the problems of his parish from a more personal perspective. No?

    Now don’t get mad at me, Mike. You know I’ve thought this forever.

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  9. MJBubba:

    Hypatia:
    I just don’t know that Catholicism is as important in the world as Catholics think.

    A third of the world is Christian.   Half of all Christians are in fellowship with the Church of Rome.

    And 25% of the world is Islamic (80% Sunni/20% Shia). Numbers aren’t everything.

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  10. Hypatia:
    The Catholic church effed him, now he’s effin’ the church.

    I think he is trying to save the church, and eff its destroyers.

    All I know of Milo I know from an interview with Jordan Peterson in which he impressed me as a brave and independent thinker.  On the subject of homosexuality, he thinks it’s disordered and an undesirable condition. He thinks marriage should be between a man and a woman. On the other hand he is legally married to a man. So that’s disappointing, but human.

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  11. If you didn’t already love him, that “Christine Blazing Faggot” skit  somebody published a few weeks ago should put you over the top.

    Is he trying to save the church?  Here’s the funny thing: as a gay man,  in actual practice the church has been a refuge for guys like him, sanctuary where they could live on a same-sex  environment and have access to their ideal, the ephebes.   One of the prominent gays on R> explicitly argued that in connection with a debate about the abuse scandals: gays were driven to the church because of homophobia in the larger society (as if there wasn’t always a gay demi-monde!)   And paradoxically, at the same time, the church has traditionally condemned and punished homosexuality.  The church has been their refuge and their scourge.

    Is Milo advocating “hate the sin ,love the sinner”, which I think, is the position most consistent with Christ’s actual words?  If Milo thinks homosexuality is “disordered and undesirable” , does he want to embrace the cure?  (Laughably, you might  think priestly celibacy woulda been the cure, ha! )

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  12. EThompson:

    MJBubba:

    Hypatia:
    I just don’t know that Catholicism is as important in the world as Catholics think.

    A third of the world is Christian.   Half of all Christians are in fellowship with the Church of Rome.

    And 25% of the world is Islamic (80% Sunni/20% Shia). Numbers aren’t everything.

    Agreed; numbers aren’t everything.

    But “over a billion members” is a pretty good number.

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  13. MJBubba:
    But “over a billion members” is a pretty good number.

    Agree especially since there are 1.8 billion Islamists and say, if only 10% are jihadists, that’s an intimidating number as well.

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  14. In the interview with Jordan Peterson, Milo said he wished conversion therapy worked.

    I am sure many homosexual men chose priesthood as sort of a cure – an honorable and productive life option that was open to them when other options were closed. And then they couldn’t live up to their ideal, which we all can understand.  But the seduction of teenage boys is too despicable for words.

    Milo was social-banned for saying he did not feel like a victim of the priest who seduced him at 14.  Very interestingly, he says in the last two years he has come to understand and somewhat agree with the outrage. He now has a teenage stepson and says he would unleash furies on an older man who seduced his stepson. So he just needed to grow up a bit and get a larger perspective.

    Actually I suspect Milo was really social-banned for saying the older man-younger man dynamic is a widespread thing. I wouldn’t know if that is true but I know if it is, Big Gay won’t let you say so. Milo’s opinion is he was banned for no particular reason, he just made too many people uneasy so they found an excuse.

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  15. “Made too many people uneasy” is so true!  F’rinstance, if I think too much about sodomy, I can’t help but find it disgusting, in spite of the fact that I love Milo’s totally accurate perspective on Western civ.

    I’ve said before, I think on the Christine Blazing  Faggot post, that I can’t share the horror about “seduction of teenaged boys”.  From everything I read, both ancient and modern, sex is pretty much all teenaged boys want, all they think about.  They’ve all got Portnoy’s complaint. I’d imagine the urge is the same no matter which way their inclination lies.  I guess it depends if you equate seduction with rape; I don’t.  And man-boy love, while kinda repulsive in detail to me, is not at all outside the human mainstream.  Samesex marriage is.

    for whatever reason, I’m just very happy if Milo is making a comeback!   I read he was head over heels in debt and I hope his book pulls him outta that hole.

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  16. Hypatia:
    And man-boy love, while kinda repulsive in detail to me, is not at all outside the human mainstream.

    Or the annals of history but I’ll be frank, it crosses a personal line in the sand for me. No reason either gender should introduce kids (and that’s what they are) to things they aren’t ready for which is why there are statutory rape laws, age limits to drive a car, enlist in the military and to buy a beer in a bar (although I admittedly question that one) !

    I think the drinking age should be lower and the military recruitment age should be raised to 21.

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  17. Man-boy love is definitely outside of the mainstream and has always been outside of the mainstream of human behavior.

    Much is made of the ancient Greeks and their practices.   Their practices are known because the Romans snickered and ridiculed the Greeks for it.   Both Muslims and Pagans look down on societies where it is practiced (Afghanistan).   It is offensive.   It offends physically, culturally and spiritually.

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  18. Jojo:
    In the interview with Jordan Peterson, Milo said he wished conversion therapy worked.

    If he honestly thinks this, then he should try it.

    Of course, he would have to make sure it is legal where he is, because some states have outlawed it.

    The idea that it cannot work is propaganda from Big Gay, spread by Leftist mass media.

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  19. Hey, Catholic Ratburghers, I want to see one of you respond to Ms. EThompson’s comment #12.

    If you don’t, then you may have to endure a response from a confessional Lutheran.

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  20. MJBubba:
    Man-boy love is definitely outside of the mainstream and has always been outside of the mainstream of human behavior.

    Much is made of the ancient Greeks and their practices.   Their practices are known because the Romans snickered and ridiculed the Greeks for it.   Both Muslims and Pagans look down on societies where it is practiced (Afghanistan).   It is offensive.   It offends physically, culturally and spiritually.

    Yeah, you’re right those  Romans were  straight- laced models of normalcy; I reckon thats why Caligula made  his horse a consul…

    And I read somewhere that, additionally or in the alternative to the 72 virgins, the Koran promises—boys!!   Kinda like the vegan option at a reception….

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  21. MJBubba:
    Hey, Catholic Ratburghers, I want to see one of you respond to Ms. EThompson’s comment #12.

    If you don’t, then you may have to endure a response from a confessional Lutheran.

    Don’t I get in enough “debates” around here without another instigator? In any case, I was making no attacks or criticisms of another’s religion (unless you’re a Muslim and that doesn’t define as one in my book). I’m genuinely puzzled as to why a problem and a serious one at that isn’t fixed. I was only giving what I considered a practical solution.

    So who’s the Lutheran ?

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