BuzzFeed Glosses Amazon Review Fraud

Premium Member ctlaw pointed out a fascinating recent phenomenon on the recent RAMU: fraudulent reviews of Amazon products, accomplished not through the review process, but by the seller swapping out well-reviewed products for chintzy junk that doesn’t work, leaving the positive reviews in place.

Here’s a well-done overview of some aspects of Amazon review fraud.  I don’t care much for BuzzFeed, but they’re good at two things — hit and run content, and SEO.

BuzzFeed News found items across many different Amazon categories — electronics, cookware, health and personal care — that include reviews that refer to wildly different products.

This earbuds listing includes a May 15 review that reads, “If you are looking for a long lightning charger, this is the one to get.” Based on a detail in the review, it appears the charging cable was added as a product “color” variation (“Earphones 46”) to the earbud listing by the manufacturer, CaseyPop.

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9 thoughts on “BuzzFeed Glosses Amazon Review Fraud”

  1. This one was a book that had 2000 reviews averaging 4.5.

    https://smile.amazon.com/Headphone-Adapter-Compatible-Splitter-Telephone/dp/B07T7H7GQN/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=lightning+splitter&qid=1562709731&s=gateway&sr=8-2

    This particular type of product (lightning splitters) is a particularly significant area for such fraud. You will see product where most have an average rating of 1 star yet a few have a 3+ star rating. Select one of those and then look at the reviews and you will see many are for different products.

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  2. ctlaw:
    This particular type of product (lightning splitters) is a particularly significant area for such fraud. You will see product where most have an average rating of 1 star yet a few have a 3+ star rating. Select one of those and then look at the reviews and you will see many are for different products.

    Another:

    https://smile.amazon.com/Splitter-Lightning-Headphone-Connector-Compatible/dp/B07R412ZVN/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?keywords=lightning+splitter&qid=1563503175&s=gateway&sr=8-2-spons&psc=1#customerReviews

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  3. Analysis by the Guardian shows products that have actually been given one-star ratings appear alongside rave reviews of better quality items, making it impossible for consumers to judge the true value of what they are about to buy.

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/apr/05/amazon-shoppers-misled-by-bundled-product-reviews

     

    Natalie Hitchins, the head of home products and services at the consumer group Which? commented on Amazon’s practices, stating: “If online retailers are incorrectly grouping customer reviews for different products together, there is a real risk that their customers will be misled.” She added: “We need to know we can rely on the information that retailers provide about the products they sell. Online retailers must up their game and ensure reviews are presented in a clear and accurate way.”

    https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2019/04/06/report-amazon-customers-misled-by-bundled-reviews/

     

     

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  4. G.D.:
     

    Right — the article is a year old, so those particular items have long since gone the way of all things.  ctlaw also provided some hot examples in the comments which by now, you have found.

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  5. Haakon Dahl:

    G.D.:

    Right — the article is a year old, so those particular items have long since gone the way of all things.  ctlaw also provided some hot examples in the comments which by now, you have found.

    The links in my comment #6 are from April and June and are active.

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