Do like to track things?

I like systems so I find it interesting to see how an ordered package goes through a delivery process. It is especially fun for me when the package starts a half a world away. This is new because I can remember the old way that took seemingly forever to get a package to a port thento a ship. After that the ship went across an ocean to another port to find a truck. A few trucks had to go to a few delivery centers then to a front door with the package. Hopefully,I could catch the package on the first delivery. Now the system gives me tracking numbers. An email lets me know the package is on its way. The package gets sent to an airport after a local delivery center. The package then flies “business” class to the main airport in Japan. Right now the package is going through “immigration”. It looks like the package will take less than a week to get to me. This is amazing for a non-expedited package. (I could be wrong since the original delivery was supposed to be 16 days.)

Do you follow your shipments? What is the furthest you had something delivered? What was the longest time for you between an order and delivery?

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17 thoughts on “Do like to track things?”

  1. 10 Cents:
    Do you follow your shipments?

    I don’t just follow them; I stalk them. It’s gotten even worse since the US Postal Service inaugurated something called Informed Delivery, wherein you can see images of every letter (or, as they call them, mailpieces) that has been delivered to your address.

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  2. drlorentz:

    10 Cents:
    Do you follow your shipments?

    I don’t just follow them; I stalk them. It’s gotten even worse since the US Postal Service inaugurated something called Informed Delivery, wherein you can see images of every letter (or, as they call them, mailpieces) that has been delivered to your address.

    You’ve gone postal, bro. 🙂

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  3. 10 Cents:

    drlorentz:

    10 Cents:
    Do you follow your shipments?

    I don’t just follow them; I stalk them. It’s gotten even worse since the US Postal Service inaugurated something called Informed Delivery, wherein you can see images of every letter (or, as they call them, mailpieces) that has been delivered to your address.

    You’ve gone postal, bro. 🙂

    You don’t hear about postal workers shooting up their workplaces. Either it’s not happening anymore or it’s so common that it’s no longer worthy of reporting.

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  4. drlorentz:

    10 Cents:

    drlorentz:

    10 Cents:
    Do you follow your shipments?

    I don’t just follow them; I stalk them. It’s gotten even worse since the US Postal Service inaugurated something called Informed Delivery, wherein you can see images of every letter (or, as they call them, mailpieces) that has been delivered to your address.

    You’ve gone postal, bro. 🙂

    You don’t hear about postal workers shooting up their workplaces. Either it’s not happening anymore or it’s so common that it’s no longer worthy of reporting.

    I think they discontinued that service due to budget cuts.

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  5. I love FedEx.

    But my favorite delivery tale is from 1983, when FedEx was very very new.

    Snooks got a call on Friday morning early, from her boss who was in Helsinki at a factory.   He had been diverted by the client into working on a major data corruption problem.   He decided that the only reliable way to restore their normal operations was to obtain the backup that the company had in Knoxville.   Snooks loaded the backup database onto a Winchester drive and spent the next several hours desperately phoning around for a shipper.

    Consolidated Freight said that they just happened to have a flight leaving Knoxville that would allow pretty direct connections through.   Snooks drove to Consolidated Freight early Friday afternoon.   The drive arrived in Helsinki in the middle of Saturday afternoon.   That means the drive had only spent about four hours being transferred on the ground because it would have had to have been in the air all the rest of that time.

    Snooks’s boss was a real hero when the client came in on Monday to a completely restored system.

    There was no tracking.   We had never heard of tracking back then.   Snooks could only cross her fingers and hope.   She didn’t even find out what a great success it was until Tuesday morning.

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  6. Like MJBubba’s story, this is not so much about tracking as it is about the early days of express shipment.

    In one instance, we had to get a proposal to the Imperial Capital by early the following morning. At that time, FedEx wasn’t quite fast enough. Delta Airlines used to have a service called Captain’s Pouch (something like that). If you drove your package to the airport, they’d put the package on a specific Delta flight and they’d get it to the destination on the other end.

    In another case, we had to send a classified document to the Imperial Capital. At the time, one was not allowed to use FedEx; only the Postal Service was authorized for handling such documents. Since the document had to be there by the next morning, we booked a flight and sent a secretary on a red-eye. People with clearances are allowed to be couriers. Since this was the pre-mobile phone era, that package couldn’t be tracked either.

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  7. drlorentz:
    Like MJBubba’s story, this is not so much about tracking as it is about the early days of express shipment.

    In one instance, we had to get a proposal to the Imperial Capital by early the following morning. At that time, FedEx wasn’t quite fast enough. Delta Airlines used to have a service call Captain’s Pouch (something like that). If you drove your package to the airport, they’d put the package on a specific Delta flight and they’d get it to the destination on the other end.

    In another case, we had to send a classified document to the Imperial Capital. At the time, one was not allowed to use FedEx; only the Postal Service was authorized for handling such documents. Since the document had to be there by the next morning, we booked a flight and sent a secretary on a red-eye. People with clearances are allowed to be couriers. Since this was the pre-mobile phone era, that package couldn’t be tracked either.

    Did the Wright Brothers fly the plane? 🙂

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  8. I sell some of my greeting cards online but almost always get orders within the US. Last year I got a request from France. I took the package of cards to our PO here in a little suburb of Phila on Jan 7 and I got an email from the woman on Jan. 11 saying she received them. About a month before that I mailed a painting to a friend in Ireland – it took just about a month to get to her! I checked the tracking daily & for some reason it was routed to JAPAN before getting to the Emerald Isle. Now WHO could have created that disruption?*?*?*?

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  9. Pencilvania:
    I sell some of my greeting cards online but almost always get orders within the US. Last year I got a request from France. I took the package of cards to our PO here in a little suburb of Phila on Jan 7 and I got an email from the woman on Jan. 11 saying she received them. About a month before that I mailed a painting to a friend in Ireland – it took just about a month to get to her! I checked the tracking daily & for some reason it was routed to JAPAN before getting to the Emerald Isle. Now WHO could have created that disruption?*?*?*?

    Whistling and trying to look not guilty.

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  10. 10 Cents:

    Pencilvania:
    I sell some of my greeting cards online but almost always get orders within the US. Last year I got a request from France. I took the package of cards to our PO here in a little suburb of Phila on Jan 7 and I got an email from the woman on Jan. 11 saying she received them. About a month before that I mailed a painting to a friend in Ireland – it took just about a month to get to her! I checked the tracking daily & for some reason it was routed to JAPAN before getting to the Emerald Isle. Now WHO could have created that disruption?*?*?*?

    Whistling and trying to look not guilty.

    I thought as much.

    Dang you and your super powers, Sock Puppet!

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  11. Pencilvania:

    10 Cents:

    Pencilvania:
    I sell some of my greeting cards online but almost always get orders within the US. Last year I got a request from France. I took the package of cards to our PO here in a little suburb of Phila on Jan 7 and I got an email from the woman on Jan. 11 saying she received them. About a month before that I mailed a painting to a friend in Ireland – it took just about a month to get to her! I checked the tracking daily & for some reason it was routed to JAPAN before getting to the Emerald Isle. Now WHO could have created that disruption?*?*?*?

    Whistling and trying to look not guilty.

    I thought as much.

    Dang you and your super powers, Sock Puppet!

    Sabotage came from throwing a shoe in the machinery. Pikers! Nothing gums up things like a sock especially with a big static electric shock. Anyway one island nation looks like another.

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  12. We get a lot of things from Amazon and I enjoy tracking them.  In particular, it is always interesting to see where they start.  Amazon used to use FedEx or UPS, then seemed to switch to the Postal Service for the “last mile”.  That usually worked pretty well.  These days, they have switched to either Amazon branded vans or what appears to be some sort of Uber-like free-lance guys in their own cars.  The service has gotten much more erratic since then.  Often, I will see the notice that the package is “Out For Delivery” from a site that is fairly local, only to get a notice later that there has been a “Problem” and the package will be either late or I need to re-order it.

    We live out in the country and my theory is that when they used FedEx or the Post Office, the drivers knew the route pretty well.  The free-lance guys (who are always different) probably don’t understand the area at all.

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  13. My order is about to arrive. It has taken about a week to get from the East Coast to the middle of Japan. It could have been even shorter if I had been willing to pay the express rate. I wonder if this is a two way thing. Can a person in America order from Japanese Amazon and get the product in the same time?

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  14. It got here. I should check out my options to buy socks. My feet are a little too big for the country I live in.

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