Gas Who?

In a lively IRL conversation with a brilliant Ratty  (hi Phil!) and my equally brilliant husband, we agreed that,  if we got rid of farting cows à la Green New Deal,  and all Earthlings started eating vegan, our human collective gaseous eruptions  would be voluminous,  and probably  exceed any negative effects of bovine emanations.  Food for thought…..

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8 thoughts on “Gas Who?”

  1. Hypatia:
    … if we got rid of farting cows à la Green New Deal,  and all Earthlings started eating vegan, our human collective gaseous eruptions  would be voluminous,  and probably  exceed any negative effects of bovine emanations.

    I realise this was in jest, but it wouldn’t work that way.  Cows produce such a large volume of methane (on the order of 100 kg per year, the overwhelming majority emitted from the mouth rather than the other end) because as ruminants they have bacteria in their digestive tract which ferment the cellulose into simple molecules which serve as nutrients, with methane gas a primary by-product of the fermentation.  Humans do not have these bacteria (nor is their digestive tract suitable to support them) which is why we can’t eat grass or other high-cellulose plants.  The plants we can eat contain molecules we can digest, and that digestion produces limited amounts of methane.

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  2. John Walker:

    Hypatia:
    … if we got rid of farting cows à la Green New Deal,  and all Earthlings started eating vegan, our human collective gaseous eruptions  would be voluminous,  and probably  exceed any negative effects of bovine emanations.

    I realise this was in jest, but it wouldn’t work that way.  Cows produce such a large volume of methane (on the order of 100 kg per year, the overwhelming majority emitted from the mouth rather than the other end) because as ruminants they have bacteria in their digestive tract which ferment the cellulose into simple molecules which serve as nutrients, with methane gas a primary by-product of the fermentation.  Humans do not have these bacteria (nor is their digestive tract suitable to support them) which is why we can’t eat grass or other high-cellulose plants.  The plants we can eat contain molecules we can digest, and that digestion produces limited amounts of methane.

    Oh.

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  3. Well, there goes my hopes of harnessing a renewable resource. I could have had a natural gas farm and sold franchises.

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  4. John Walker:
    I realise this was in jest, but it wouldn’t work that way.

    Party-pooper.  (-:

    The customer that gave me an excuse to stop by Hypatia’s place threw me right into the frying pan Monday morning….

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  5. Phil Turmel:

    John Walker:
    I realise this was in jest, but it wouldn’t work that way.

    Party-pooper.  (-:

    The customer that gave me an excuse to stop by Hypatia’s place threw me right into the frying pan Monday morning….

    Lightly sauteed or burned to a crisp, Phil?

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