Charting the Narrative

“White Privilege” in New York Times articlesIn a number of comments on various posts here over the last year or so, and asides in main posts, I have discussed my conclusion that there is an organised mechanism, akin to a public relations firm, which is generating the “narrative” that seems to occupy the minds of the legacy media and politicians associated with them at any given moment.  I have no concrete evidence to back up this belief, but the existence of JournoList between 2007 and 2010 (which was shut down after its public exposure) indicates that prominent media figures are interested in and willing to co-ordinate their efforts in favour of the causes they advocate.

My conviction that the narrative of the moment is actively manufactured, disseminated among top-level figures in the media and “progressive” politics, and then passed down through the ranks by a mechanism akin to an old-time “phone tree” (in which most of the ultimate recipients are unaware of the origin of the themes and specific phrases they parrot), is that the way each new obsession simultaneously appears within hours to days on the lips and in the printed works of hundreds of supposedly independent players simply doesn’t fit the model of the organic diffusion of information.  Further, when precisely the same phrases are used by widely-separated speakers, and a neatly packaged interpretation of an unexpected event is presented a day or two after it happens, that doesn’t look like a bottom-up process.  And finally, when you observe this phenomenon again and again, with precisely the same pattern, that reinforces the suspicion that something is going on to make it happen.  As Ian Fleming had his supervillain Auric Goldfinger say, “Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it’s enemy action.”

The idea of some kind of Cominform developing, distributing, and adjusting a narrative aimed at advancing the slaver agenda is not new.  You can see a wickedly funny take on it in Deplora Boule’s superb novel, The Narrative, and a thriller based upon the idea in the Glenn Beck-produced and not terribly good books The Overton Window and The Eye of Moloch.  But is something like this really going on?   I have suggested for some time that, if so, it could be tracked down through patient, shoe-leather reporting, developing sources among low-level employees on the staff of prominent politicians and top tier news media, then following the flow of information back to its source.  I believe it may be the story of the decade, at least as big as the ongoing disclosures of bias among Internet search and social media companies which were discovered by the same kind of process.

Just as even subtle bias leaves its fingerprints on results which can be tested independently by outside observers, the presence of what I will call the Narrative Machine should be detectable by analysis of the products of those it ultimately informs.

Two researchers working independently, Zach Goldberg of  Georgia State University and David Rozado of Otago Polytechnic in New Zealand, performed analyses of the frequency of words and phrases in articles published in the New York Times, an outlet one would certainly expect to be plugged into the top tier of the Narrative Machine.  Both did their research using the LexisNexis database, which is not available for free but to which their institutions subscribe.  To enable research by independent investigators without LexisNexis subscriptions, Rozado “scraped” all articles published between 1970 and 2018, and created a “New York Times Media Analytics” Web site which allows exploration of the frequency of word appearances in text over that time period.  (The database only supports queries for single words such as “intersectionality”, but does not allow searching for phrases such as “white supremacy”.  This limits its utility for many queries you’d like to run.)

Rozado prepared two large “narrative dashboards” of the relative frequency of the use of words and phrases in the New York Times between 1970 and 2018.  In each chart the horizontal axis is time and the vertical axis shows normalised word or phrase frequency, where the year in which the word was used most frequently is the maximum of 1.0 and years when it was never mentioned are 0.0.  Behold the power of this fully-weaponised narrative.  (Click the charts to enlarge in a separate window/tab.)

New York Times Word Usage Frequency (1970–2018), 1 of 2

New York Times Word Usage Frequency (1970–2018), 2 of 2

Now, there are many startling and enlightening things about these charts, which will reward your extended examination.  Of course, like any deep dive into data, there are dozens of other analyses you’ll immediately want to run, in particular comparisons of relative frequencies of different words and phrases to the same scale, or comparison of graphs among supposedly independent media outlets, but unless you have access to LexisNexis you can’t do this.

The data plotted by Zach Goldberg are remarkably similar, and exhibit the same “hockey stick” with a dramatic take-off around 2013 for many current hot-button terms.

The striking discontinuity starting around 2014 was named “The Great Awokening” by Matthew Yglesias in Vox, citing public opinion polls, but saying relatively little about causation.  The data from Goldberg and Rozado are evidence, albeit from a single media outlet (though one from whom many others, especially mainstream broadcasters, set their priorities), that this “Awokening” was coincident with, or preceded by, a massive increase in media focus on the keywords with which the “woke” are obsessed.  Steve Sailer has explored this in his essay “The Great Awokening Conspiracy Theory” in Taki’s Magazine.

On August 15th, 2019, Slate published “The New York Times Unites vs. Twitter”, a transcript of a “town hall” meeting of executive editor Dean Baquet with staffers upset over the recent kerfuffle over the printing, then changing, a front page headline which initially read “TRUMP URGES UNITY VS. RACISM”, later “revised” to “ASSAILING HATE BUT NOT GUNS”.  This article does not speak directly to the issue of the Narrative Machine, but it is instructive to hear an exchange like this:

Baquet: I think that that word it loses its power by the second or third time. I do. I think that these words—can I talk about the use of the word lie for one second?

Staffer: As long as you come back to my original question.

Baquet: I will, I will. I’m not running away from you, you know me.

I used the word lie once during the presidential campaign, used it a couple times after that. And it was pretty clear it was a lie, and we were the first ones to use it. But I fear that if we used it 20 times, 10 times, first, it would lose its power. And secondly, I thought we would find ourselves in the uncomfortable position of deciding which comment by which politician fit the word lie. I feel the same way about the word racist.

This is precisely what we’ve observed from the outside: a word, like “racist”, becomes used up, loses its effectiveness, and must be replaced by a new term such as “white nationalist” or “white supremacist”, which have just recently been rolled out and now we’re hearing everywhere.  It is not probative of the existence of a Narrative Machine that an executive editor is instructing his staff on the currently effective terminology, but it is consistent with the top-down model.  In particular, read the concluding exchange which begins with the question:

Staffer: Hello, I have another question about racism. I’m wondering to what extent you think that the fact of racism and white supremacy being sort of the foundation of this country should play into our reporting. Just because it feels to me like it should be a starting point, you know? Like these conversations about what is racist, what isn’t racist. I just feel like racism is in everything. It should be considered in our science reporting, in our culture reporting, in our national reporting. And so, to me, it’s less about the individual instances of racism, and sort of how we’re thinking about racism and white supremacy as the foundation of all of the systems in the country. And I think particularly as we are launching a 1619 Project, I feel like that’s going to open us up to even more criticism from people who are like, “OK, well you’re saying this, and you’re producing this big project about this. But are you guys actually considering this in your daily reporting?”

In case you’re curious, this is the “1619 Project”.  I predict it will contain the next batch of phrases from the Narrative Machine, including “If you want to understand the brutality of American capitalism, you have to start on the plantation.”

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Author: John Walker

Founder of Ratburger.org, Autodesk, Inc., and Marinchip Systems. Author of The Hacker's Diet. Creator of www.fourmilab.ch.

78 thoughts on “Charting the Narrative”

  1. This is so sophisticated I can’t be sure I’m getting it all.  And…Is there a solution?  Can we fight back?  Is the 1619 Project a countering strategy, or just research? As I wrote elsewhere, why are geniuses always evil?

    But I am being driven insane by the words’n’phrases, among them

    above the law

    nation of immigrants

    in the shadows (ref illegal,aliens)

    a better life.      (See above)

    breaking up families (see above)

    diversity

    white privilege

     

    …as we say in church: are there others you would name?

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  2. Imagine that – the 1619 project (sic) says out loud it intends to rewrite “reframe” history. I am sure glad that doesn’t happen much here. In their attempt to remain sane, one of the favorite, whispered aphorisms of those enjoying the workers’ paradise of the erstwhile Soviet Union was that, “In the Soviet Union, the past …. is very hard to predict.” It feels to me like the pressure in this country is rising exponentially.

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  3. Hypatia:
    Is the 1619 Project a countering strategy, or just research?

    It is the narrative, or perhaps, a trial run of the new, updated narrative.  From the New York Times Magazine site:

    The 1619 Project is a major initiative from The New York Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are.

    Here is a table of contents from the issue.  Articles include:

    • America Wasn’t a Democracy, Until Black Americans Made It One
    • American Capitalism Is Brutal. You Can Trace That to the Plantation.
    • A New Literary Timeline of African-American History
    • How False Beliefs in Physical Racial Difference Still Live in Medicine Today
    • What the Reactionary Politics of 2019 Owe to the Politics of Slavery
    • How Segregation Caused Your Traffic Jam
    • Why Doesn’t America Have Universal Health Care? One Word: Race
    • Why American Prisons Owe Their Cruelty to Slavery
    • How America’s Vast Racial Wealth Gap Grew: By Plunder
    • Their Ancestors Were Enslaved by Law. Now They’re Lawyers.
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  4. There’s certainly plenty of cause for concern. However, the evidence is weak that this is an organized narrative along the lines of JournoList. Human societies are capable of spontaneous self-organization. Capitalist markets are a prime example. The marketplace of ideas is no different. An idea is floated and those who like it and agree propagate it. Memes provide a low-level example: Carpe Donktum makes an amusing meme and the next thing you know the president is retweeting it. 

    Take implicit bias as a case study. Way back in 2006, I heard a talk by Mahzarin Banaji, the promoter-in-chief of the Implicit Association Test (IAT), which got the implicit bias ball rolling. Her talk was weak and immediately pinned my BS-meter all the way on the right. This paper, published in 2009, quantified how weak the evidence was. But results using the test itself were originally published in 1998. Now compare these dates with the timeline for “implicit bias” in the NYT.

    These things take time to percolate up. After a false start c. 2008, it started to take off around 2013 and spiking up in 2015/16, possibly because of Trump.

    The lesson is that politics is downstream from culture. More precisely:
    biology–>culture–>institutions–>politics  [h/t Zman]
    The battle for the institutions was lost long ago. The only hope is to rebuild the culture in a manner more congenial to freedom and in closer contact with reality. Until that happens, everything else is a waste of time.

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  5. Do you remember the word gravitas to describe  Dick Cheney? Half the MSM were saying it while the other half was looking it up in the dictionary.

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  6. In my thinking, perhaps incorrect or incomplete, the “progressive” sphere — the progosphere, as it were — is basically a Borg-like colony.  A relative handful of thought-drivers reside at its center, and they manufacture and disseminate the Narrative, to be imbibed by the believers.   Even though sometimes radical shifts are sometimes deemed necessary, the eternal now in which they exist does not admit that it has ever been different.  Past dalliances with odious concepts such as eugenics and racism are not denied or ignored as much as expunged from memory.  Inconsistencies are denied, deviations are denounced, and divergences are quickly equilibrated. 

    I’ve been (gently) asking my progosphere-trapped friends if they remember back when the D-party spoke frequency about the middle class and how illegals were actively hurting them.  It’s funny, it really wasn’t all that long ago, but it’s so difficult for them to recall…

    It reminds me of this frightening passage from 1984 (some editing applied):

    Winston was taking part in a demonstration in one of the central London squares at the moment when it happened. It was night, and the white faces and the scarlet banners were luridly floodlit. The square was packed with several thousand people, including a block of about a thousand schoolchildren in the uniform of the Spies. On a scarlet-draped platform an orator of the Inner Party, a small lean man with disproportionately long arms and a large bald skull over which a few lank locks straggled, was haranguing the crowd. […] His voice, made metallic by the amplifiers, boomed forth an endless catalogue of atrocities, massacres, deportations, lootings, rapings, torture of prisoners, bombing of civilians, lying propaganda, unjust aggressions, broken treaties. It was almost impossible to listen to him without being first convinced and then maddened. […]

     

    The speech had been proceeding for perhaps twenty minutes when a messenger hurried on to the platform and a scrap of paper was slipped into the speaker’s hand. He unrolled and read it without pausing in his speech. Nothing altered in his voice or manner, or in the content of what he was saying, but suddenly the names were different. Without words said, a wave of understanding rippled through the crowd. Oceania was at war with Eastasia! The next moment there was a tremendous commotion. The banners and posters with which the square was decorated were all wrong! Quite half of them had the wrong faces on them. It was sabotage! The agents of Goldstein had been at work! There was a riotous interlude while posters were ripped from the walls, banners torn to shreds and trampled underfoot. The Spies performed prodigies of activity in clambering over the rooftops and cutting the streamers that fluttered from the chimneys. But within two or three minutes it was all over. […] The Hate continued exactly as before, except that the target had been changed.

    We’ve always been at war with Eastasia, comrade.

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  7. PhCheese:
    Do you remember the word gravitas to describe  Dick Cheney? Half the MSM were saying it while the other half was looking it up in the dictionary.

    Here is the time series for “gravitas”.

    Time series of “gravitas” between 1970 and 2018

    There were no references at all before 1989, 5 in 1989, 8 in 1990, 0 again in 1991, 6 in 1992, 8 in 1993, then back to zero in 1994.  In 1995 it jumped up to 17 and has never fallen below 16 since.  Between 1999 and 2000 it vaulted from 30 to 77 (presumably the “Cheney bump”) and hit its record in 2006.  It then plunged back in 2008, but has been rattling around ever since.  It’s like once the word gets into their vocabulary, they keep on finding ways to use it.

    (The chart is in terms of frequency among the corpus, not absolute number, so there is not a direct correlation between number of appearances and frequency as plotted on the chart.)  You can make your own queries at the New York Times Media Analytics site.

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  8. drlorentz:
    However, the evidence is weak that this is an organized narrative along the lines of JournoList. Human societies are capable of spontaneous self-organization. Capitalist markets are a prime example. The marketplace of ideas is no different. An idea is floated and those who like it and agree propagate it.

    That’s been my general model.  But if that’s the case, then what I’d expect to see in the dashboard of such a wide variety of terms is spikes occurring at random times as individual ideas hit critical mass or are triggered by events, then decay as other concerns replace them.  You certainly see some of those in the data: for example “avian flu” when that was a hot story, “VCR” when that technology took off, “nuclear energy” around Three Mile Island, etc.  But what’s downright crazy is seeing a dozens of largely unrelated terms take off toward the sky all at the same time around 2013–2014.  I don’t see anything like that happening across such a broad spectrum of terms (of course, we have to keep in mind that the terms were selected from a present-day perspective, and that other terms would have been chosen at points in the past) all at once over the almost half century in the database.  At a glance, this looks like Heinlein’s “Year of the Jackpot” [PDF].  I hope the ending is better.

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  9. I just read the article on the 1619 project. HO-SHEE-LIT!   (  Pardon my Chinese…) I only hope Trump is right and the NYT really IS “failing”.

    The USA was NOT founded 1n 1619.; a patchwork of colonies were.    Yeah, most people think of 1776 as our country’s birthday—and they’re right.  What I have been arguing for years is that it was not the US who brought the Africans here: it was the now so sanctimonious English, Dutch, French, and Spanish. That didn’t seem to have occurred to a lot of people. I know it’s ridiculous, but  I almost feel responsible, as if this is a concerted effort to refute MY unpopular but heretofore unanswerable argument.

    Slavery held us back. After the Civil War with the sharecropper system, 63% white and every man free, we grew more cotton than ever before.

    Whats the goal here? I guess to get white people, as we have been  exhorted, to “cancel” ourselves?  OH I am so depressed!  Now, the US has to be blamed for all the sins of the Colonial powers—and they are legion!—all their bloody wars and massacres? YTF not, if we can be blamed for their importation of African slaves to their captured territories?

    O Ratty, do you think we can dig our way outta this one?

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  10. That is really useful work.   Congrats to Z. Goldberg and D. Rozado.

    Of course they can give up any thought of ever finding employment in journalism or academia.

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  11. Hypatia:
    Whats the goal here? I guess to get white people, as we have been  exhorted, to “cancel” ourselves?  OH I am so depressed!  Now, the US has to be blamed for all the sins of the Colonial powers—and they are legion!—all their bloody wars and massacres? YTF not, if we can be blamed for their importation of African slaves to their captured territories?

    Yes, absolutely, the goal is to build white guilt, spread white guilt, talk up white guilt, and ultimately use white guilt as leverage to get whites to stay home and not vote.   The Left is comfortable giving up on whites entirely; they know they will always retain a thin veneer of white elites, and they will also be able to scare a lot of white single women.   Otherwise, they are finding that turning white people into an enemy is working as a strategy to appeal to voters of color.

    Fortunately for us, that seems to be failing as a strategy.   Witness the latest from Zogby:

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/washington-secrets/zogby-poor-performances-of-democrats-boost-trumps-approval-to-51-up-with-blacks-hispanics

    Good for you for pushing back against the red-write of history.   African slaves were purchased by the traders who were working the African coasts and found ready sellers, primarily Muslims.   The European colonial powers were taking African slaves to work colonial plantations all over the world.   They saw the British New World colonies as no different.

    Thankfully the American colonies did turn out differently.

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  12. Hypatia:
    Slavery held us back. After the Civil War with the sharecropper system, 63% white and every man free, we grew more cotton than ever before.

    I don’t know where you get this idea, and I do not believe that it actually represents much in the way of actual trends or any indication that slavery held us back.   There was plenty of sharecropping going on before the war, by free whites who were poor.   One branch of my family includes white sharecroppers before the War, who did not own any slaves.

    I think the great advances in cotton production had a lot more to do with the application of science and industry to agriculture.   Improvements to cotton breeding and improvements to farm implements and devices had a lot more to do with increases in production.   I will readily admit that sharecropping was more productive than slave plantations, but that is only part of the picture.

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  13. John Walker:
    But what’s downright crazy is seeing a dozens of largely unrelated terms take off toward the sky all at the same time around 2013–2014.

    Couldn’t that just be selection bias? I bet you could pick a bunch of terms that peaked around 2000-2001: terrorism, millennium, Islam. OK, so that’s an easy one.

    The thing is, the terms in the figures in the OP aren’t “unrelated.” They are part of a unified whole: substitution of grievance/identity politics for Western values. Your thesis is that there’s a coherent narrative. I agree but believe it to have arisen organically rather than by central planning. It’s also worth noting that there are language fads. Business-speak is the worst. You can play this game at Google Ngrams, which searches books and does allow for phrases (bigrams and more). “Total quality management” produces a nice spike.

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  14. MJBubba:

    Hypatia:
    Slavery held us back. After the Civil War with the sharecropper system, 63% white and every man free, we grew more cotton than ever before.

    I don’t know where you get this idea, and I do not believe that it actually represents much in the way of actual trends or any indication that slavery held us back.   There was plenty of sharecropping going on before the war, by free whites who were poor.   One branch of my family includes white sharecroppers before the War, who did not own any slaves.

    I think the great advances in cotton production had a lot more to do with the application of science and industry to agriculture.   Improvements to cotton breeding and improvements to farm implements and devices had a lot more to do with increases in production.   I will readily admit that sharecropping was more productive than slave plantations, but that is only part of the picture.

    First, my sympathies about the Civil War.  We had this out on another thread, where I was, frankly, stunned to hear that some DixieRattys  “cringe” when they hear The Battle Hymn of the Republic.( I think that was you, wasnt it? Truly: sorry.)

    I kinda  think you’ve proved my point: “sharecropping was more productive than slave plantations”. Sooooo, if all the agriculture in Dixie had been sharecropper operations instead of slave labor, I think we hafta conclude that it would have been more efficient from the beginning: slavery hindered, rather than fostered, cotton production.  That’s all.

    Our country would have been (even) better off without slavery.  Do you agree with that? Yes or no?

    (As for where I got the idea, I pretty sure it was one of Ann Coulter’s books, I dk which.  And I hope to God  that Ann will jump on this 1619 crapola.)

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  15. MJBubba:
    Fortunately for us, that seems to be failing as a strategy.   Witness the latest from Zogby:

    Good if true. I wonder if other polling firms support the stats on minorities that Zogby found.

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  16. Given the amount of money arrayed against the USA and the fact that it is in a very small number of hands would lead one to the conclusion that basic business marketing skills are being deployed to drive the messaging at the behest of these aligned interests. The media is very concentrated into a few large corporations, social media is also so a fair amount of cash buys the talent and access to create and send the drumbeat.

    Amazing that it could be derailed by one guy with a read on the people and a big damn mouth.

    It could be that freedom and prosperity is a better message requiring less force to drive it than coddled slavery and diminishing prospects for the future.

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  17. John Walker:

    drlorentz:
    However, the evidence is weak that this is an organized narrative along the lines of JournoList. Human societies are capable of spontaneous self-organization. Capitalist markets are a prime example. The marketplace of ideas is no different. An idea is floated and those who like it and agree propagate it.

    That’s been my general model.  But if that’s the case, then what I’d expect to see in the dashboard of such a wide variety of terms is spikes occurring at random times as individual ideas hit critical mass or are triggered by events, then decay as other concerns replace them.  You certainly see some of those in the data: for example “avian flu” when that was a hot story, “VCR” when that technology took off, “nuclear energy” around Three Mile Island, etc.  But what’s downright crazy is seeing a dozens of largely unrelated terms take off toward the sky all at the same time around 2013–2014.  I don’t see anything like that happening across such a broad spectrum of terms (of course, we have to keep in mind that the terms were selected from a present-day perspective, and that other terms would have been chosen at points in the past) all at once over the almost half century in the database.  At a glance, this looks like Heinlein’s “Year of the Jackpot” [PDF].  I hope the ending is better.

    One would think, except our public thought generators (MSM, University, Entertainment Culture) aren’t a free marketplace. To carry the analogy further, the crappy ideas they propagate are artificially subsidized. So while you won’t see poor products die off of their own accord within these rigidly controlled marketplaces, you will see smaller numbers of consumers of these marketplaces overall.

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  18. As for where narratives come from: Influencer groups (the DNC, Indivisible, any number of political think tanks and agitation groups) issue briefs that contain talking points to their subscribers. That’s how you get identical phrases on the tips of so many tongues in the blink of an eye.

    And yes, many of these narratives are pre-written and await only the proper names, dates, and locations to be filled in. (I forget the exact instances, but sometimes, some outlets are in such haste to get the story out, they occasionally leave in a placeholder. Watch and you’ll see it sometime.) When the narrative requires a court action, a case will be initiated on purpose, custom-made for the pre-written story. (Same-sex marriage was advanced using this strategy.) Other narratives require a predictable action to occur (mass shootings being used to strip 2A rights, for example), but they are already written and ready to go the instant the bodies hit the floor.

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  19. Steve Sailer’s article “The Great Awokening Conspiracy Theory”, cited in the main post, speculates that perhaps the Great Awokening was ginned up by élites concerned with the rise of the “Occupy” movement and class warfare, to divert attention back to identity politics and inter-group grievances.

    The conspiracy theory is that the emergence of a socialist protest movement three years after the economic collapse of 2008 terrified the rich. But they noticed that Occupy was easily distracted from its class warfare by its urge to indulge the perpetually wounded feelings of the “progressive stack.” The more intersectional Pokémon Points that would-be speakers possess, the more likely they are chosen to orate.

    Rich white guys, who aren’t dumb, would have quickly figured out that their biggest worry is not-rich white guys. In contrast, privileging more intersectional personalities, such as black women, tended to get leftists sidetracked from discussing confiscatory taxes into passionate diatribes about how white Beckys were dissing their Afros.

    This theory that Woke Capital cynically conspired to divide and conquer economic leftism by promoting the Great Awokening sounds plausible enough. Certainly, Bernie Sanders feels that now-fashionable notions like reparations and open borders are millstones around the necks of any Democrats’ seriously hoping to stick it to the billionaires.

    Here is a bit of evidence supporting this theory.

    New York Times frequency of “occupy”, 1970 to 2018

    Notice how “occupy” took off like a rocket in 2011, jumping from 403 references to 3162, and 7751 places on the frequency list, all the way up to rank 1953.  Then it promptly cratered in 2012 and 2013, falling to rank 6156 with 788 references.  Note that 2013 is just when all of the charts associated with the “woke” agenda started climbing toward the sky.

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  20. I am in agreement with drlorentz and Deplora Boule.   The reason that we have not seen a replacement for Journolist is because no conspiracy is needed.   The journalists are all Leftists; they all think alike.   They react very swiftly, like fish in a school.   We have all seen videos of two hundred fish all turning at once as if by a verbal command.

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  21. John Walker:
    [Steve Sailer] speculates that perhaps the Great Awokening was ginned up by élites concerned with the rise of the “Occupy” movement and class warfare, to divert attention back to identity politics and inter-group grievances.

    If that was a deliberate strategy then it failed.

    The Democrat Anti-American Party is not now less likely to impose confiscatory taxes.

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  22. MJBubba:
    They react very swiftly, like fish in a school.   We have all seen videos of two hundred fish all turning at once as if by a verbal command.

    A useful word to add to one’s vocabulary (and concept to one’s armamentarium) is “murmuration”.  Investment advisor James Dines has used it for years to describe the flocking behaviour of investors toward fads and trends.  The fact that it is generally applied to starlings makes it particularly appropriate when describing equally destructive flocks of slavers.

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  23. Byron York wrote about the Time’s despicable project. Here’s how they plan to drive their garbage anti-American propaganda into children’s minds:

    [A] project with the aim of reframing U.S. history has to be more than a bunch of articles and podcasts. A major goal of The 1619 Project is to take the reframing message to schools. The Times has joined an organization called The Pulitzer Center — which, it should be noted, is not the organization that hands out the Pulitzer Prize — to create a 1619 Project curriculum. “Here you will find reading guides, activities, and other resources to bring The 1619 Project into your classroom,” the Center says in a message to teachers.

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