Life in the Fast Lane

Over the past months I have been fasting and going low carbs and almost no sugar. It has been a good way to get my portion sizes down per meal. I found out that not eating at times wasn’t going to kill me. In fact I was quite prepared to handle any “long winter” without eating.

What has been your experience with fasting? Or maybe I should get your BMI to validate your preparations for “long winters”. Also if you have experience in low carb diets that would be helpful.

My progress so far is I dropped a few sizes and looks like a few years. I have bet a friend to a 7 kilo race with lunch going to the winner. (Grams not meters.) I am about half way to the finish line.

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47 thoughts on “Life in the Fast Lane”

  1. I posted some time ago that I was amazed when I tried eliminating carbs.  I just looked up the Atkin s diet online, no Keto supplements or anything.  Amazed at how much I could eat, of meat,  including bacon, chicken salad, salami, and butter, mayo—and that my “stored” fat, specifically muffin-top  fat, still melted away! Weighing myself after I involuntarily fasted for a day during my “summer ague” , I was almost kinda scared to see that I weighed less than  I had before I got pregnant, less than I had for most of my time in college.

    Every once in a while, as I did the morning I was recovering from the fever, I will feel I really really need a bit o’  Carb,, like my body wants  some food energy  it can use right away.  And I obliged it.  Sister Jenny and I have always been fond of each other; I wouldn’t deny her  a reasonable request.

    Ive never been  a thin person (except for a brief Weight Watchers’ assay in my 20s, which, sadly, did not last; apparently it seldom does) and I never will be.  I’m not thin now ( though my BMI is within acceptable limits).  But to have shed the troublesome, slothful 5-7 lbs which bedeviled my wardrobe is, to me, a cause for rejoicing!

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  2. Hypatia:
    I posted some time ago that I was amazed when I tried eliminating carbs.  I just looked up the Atkin s diet online, no Keto supplements or anything.  Amazed at how much I could eat, of meat,  including bacon, chicken salad, salami, and butter, mayo—and that my “stored” fat, specifically muffin-top  fat, still melted away! Weighing myself after I involuntarily fasted for a day during my “summer ague” , I was almost kinda scared to see that I weighed less than  I had before I got pregnant, less than I had for most of my time in college.

    Every once in a while, as I did the morning I was recovering from the fever, I will feel I really really need a bit o’  Carb,, like my body wants  some food energy  it can use right away.  And I obliged it.  Sister Jenny and I have always been fond of each other; I wouldn’t deny her  a reasonable request.

    Ive never been  a thin person (except for a brief Weight Watchers’ assay in my 20s, which, sadly, did not last; apparently it seldom does) and I never will be.  I’m not thin now ( though my BMI is within acceptable limits).  But to have shed the troublesome, slothful 5-7 lbs which bedeviled my wardrobe is, to me, a cause for rejoicing!

    I do like allowing more fat into my diet.

    I was having trouble with a bulge in my mid sock but that is mostly gone.

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  3. Tell me dear Soxy ( although at your time of life , you may never have entertained such thoughts) would you rather die fat or thin?

    I’m thinkin’ William the Conqueror,  a man of girth who died  still in possession of  his accumulated wealth of fat.  Stuffed into a too-small stone coffin kept above- ground a few days too long, his body  bloated  and exploded  in the church!  Way to go!  

    Both of my parents loved food and were well-fleshed, at times rather excessively so,  all their lives. (And I am like unto them.)  But during the long agon,  the death march toward quietus , they shed it all.  I could encompass my mother’s upper arm with my hand,  by the end,  as easily as I could her wrist.  “Get thee to my lady’s chamber, and tell her: let her paint an inch thick, to this  favor she must  come!” My father was a tall, broad man; not extraordinarily tall, really, but there was something about him which made people remark all his life—admiringly—on his physical magnitude.   As the flesh fell away, it was a daily horror to me to be confronted, somewhere in my vision that I couldn’t look away from, with the size and weight of that skeleton.  Those huge, dense bones, so handsomely accoutred all my life, stripped to the “beggarly habiliment”, as Yeats put it.

    Would you rather be a handful of dry bones at the end, flaring up and burning like kindling in an instant, or proving a disappointment   to the blind ravenous scavengers of the earth? Or would you rather make a great crackling sizzle for the crematorium or rich feast  for the graveyard vermin?

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  4. Hypatia:
    Tell me dear Soxy ( although at your time of life , you may never have entertained such thoughts) would you rather die fat or thin?

    I’m thinkin’ William the Conqueror,  a man of girth who died  still in possession of  his accumulated wealth of fat.  Stuffed into a too-small stone coffin kept above- ground a few days too long, his body  bloated  and exploded  in the church!  Way to go!  

    Both of my parents loved food and were well-fleshed, at times rather excessively so,  all their lives. (And I am like unto them.)  But during the long agon,  the death march toward quietus , they shed it all.  I could encompass my mother’s upper arm with my hand,  by the end,  as easily as I could her wrist.  “Get thee to my lady’s chamber, and tell her: let her paint an inch thick, to this  favor she must  come!” My father was a tall, broad man; not extraordinarily tall, really, but there was something about him which made people remark all his life—admiringly—on his physical magnitude.   As the flesh fell away, it was a daily horror to me to be confronted, somewhere in my vision that I couldn’t look away from, with the size and weight of that skeleton.  Those huge, dense bones, so handsomely accoutred all my life, stripped to the “beggarly habiliment”, as Yeats put it.

    Would you rather be a handful of dry bones at the end, flaring up and burning like kindling in an instant, or proving a disappointment   to the blind ravenous scavengers of the earth? Or would you rather make a great crackling sizzle for the crematorium or rich feast  for the graveyard vermin?

    Do I get a third choice?

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  5. 10 Cents:

    Hypatia:
    Tell me dear Soxy ( although at your time of life , you may never have entertained such thoughts) would you rather die fat or thin?

    I’m thinkin’ William the Conqueror,  a man of girth who died  still in possession of  his accumulated wealth of fat.  Stuffed into a too-small stone coffin kept above- ground a few days too long, his body  bloated  and exploded  in the church!  Way to go!  

    Both of my parents loved food and were well-fleshed, at times rather excessively so,  all their lives. (And I am like unto them.)  But during the long agon,  the death march toward quietus , they shed it all.  I could encompass my mother’s upper arm with my hand,  by the end,  as easily as I could her wrist.  “Get thee to my lady’s chamber, and tell her: let her paint an inch thick, to this  favor she must  come!” My father was a tall, broad man; not extraordinarily tall, really, but there was something about him which made people remark all his life—admiringly—on his physical magnitude.   As the flesh fell away, it was a daily horror to me to be confronted, somewhere in my vision that I couldn’t look away from, with the size and weight of that skeleton.  Those huge, dense bones, so handsomely accoutred all my life, stripped to the “beggarly habiliment”, as Yeats put it.

    Would you rather be a handful of dry bones at the end, flaring up and burning like kindling in an instant, or proving a disappointment   to the blind ravenous scavengers of the earth? Or would you rather make a great crackling sizzle for the crematorium or rich feast  for the graveyard vermin?

    Do I get a third choice?

    In my experience, no.

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  6. Hypatia:
    would you rather die fat or thin?

    Well, as far back as Hippocrates around 400 B.C., it has been observed that there’s a negative correlation between excess weight and lifespan.  Here is the “Live Longer” section from the “Losing Weight” chapter of The Hacker’s Diet.

    Live longer

    Fat men are more likely to die suddenly than the slender.

    —Hippocrates, Aphorisms, c. 400 B.C.

    Every day you see plenty of fat people and lots of old people, but have you noticed how few old, fat people you see? All those geezers who make it into their eighties and nineties and call it the “prime of life” seem to be the lean, wiry type, don’t they? This isn’t because people suddenly feel compelled to lose weight sometime in their fifth or sixth decades. As the original hipster pointed out 2400 years ago, it’s because the fat ones are dying off early.

    This is the most fundamental reason to lose weight: to live longer. Whatever you value in life, you can’t enjoy it if you’re dead! What’s the trade-off between a few bad days in the course of a diet, or even low-level irritation for several months, against living for five or ten more years? Of seeing your grandchildren grow up? Of seeing your life’s work serve as the foundation for the next generation? Of finally getting the money out of your IRA? Of a happy retirement on the Moon? Whatever…death disqualifies you from every activity.

    Dieting is unpleasant and bad days are wretched, but dropping dead is worse. Tomorrow will be better.

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  7. JW of course I agree; otherwise I wouldnta  written my first comment.  But really, when we’re talkin’ dying (not living), which is worse: “dropping” dead— or slipping, declining , waning into death?  Doesn’t everybody kinda fantasize about just, instantly ceasing to be, at the very pinnacle of physical satiety, whether sated with achievement, with happiness, with wine and meat?  That’s what I was getting at.

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  8. John Walker:
    Dieting is unpleasant and bad days are wretched …

    It is indeed and this is why they always fail. Whenever I hear you can eat chocolate cake in small portions, I shake my head. Eating sugar and carbs is every bit of an addiction as taking an opiate. If you put a 16 oz bag of Doritos in front of me, I’ll eat the whole thing in one sitting so those kinds of food stay out of my house.

    Lifestyle changes make the difference. I’ve been on the “clean” diet for 20 years; grilled or broiled protein, vegetables, BIG salads, and yams. I sub Doritos with pretzels when I feel compelled to snack (carbs, but less fat).

    It works mostly because I’m never hungry and disregard portion control. I can eat as much grilled chicken as I like, gain no weight and feel full.

    What causes weight gain is what we do to natural foods- frying, dressings, sauces, etc. I’ve learned in the past three decades that food in its natural state tastes damn good. I might vomit if I ate a Big Mac now because my body is trained to enjoy simplicity.

    Deprivation is not the answer either.

    P.S. Re: Vegetarians and vegans- you’ll always be overweight because you can’t substitute pure, undressed protein that keeps you healthy and slim with pasta or bread.

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  9. 10 Cents:
    What has been your experience with fasting?

    I have been eating one meal a day ever since I was about 18 years old.  I got into this habit while working as a mainframe computer programmer while going to engineering school.  Systems programmers got their test time between 20:00 and 02:00 (when customers weren’t using the machine), and the programmers would come in to work in mid-afternoon, go out to dinner, and then come back to use the machine.  I had become so used to this, I continued it ever after.  I’d always heard that this is a bad idea, but it worked fine for me.

    I’d never heard the phrase “Intermittent Fasting” before the first Life Extension Conference in October 2010.  This was the first time I’d ever heard that eating once a day was a good idea, and why.  It was this conference which got me interested in the Paleo diet and, after reading Loren Cordain’s The Paleo Diet and Arthur De Vany’s The New Evolution Diet, I decided to try it in December 2010.  Here are my experiences reported one year later.  Simultaneously, I started experimenting with a dietary supplement programme which I have revised repeatedly over the last decade.

    Over the years, I have revised my interpretation of Paleo, but still concentrate on minimising carbohydrates and obtain most of my calories from fat and protein.

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  10. 10 Cents:

    Hypatia:
    I posted some time ago that I was amazed when I tried eliminating carbs.  I just looked up the Atkin s diet online, no Keto supplements or anything.  Amazed at how much I could eat, of meat,  including bacon, chicken salad, salami, and butter, mayo—and that my “stored” fat, specifically muffin-top  fat, still melted away! Weighing myself after I involuntarily fasted for a day during my “summer ague” , I was almost kinda scared to see that I weighed less than  I had before I got pregnant, less than I had for most of my time in college.

    Every once in a while, as I did the morning I was recovering from the fever, I will feel I really really need a bit o’  Carb,, like my body wants  some food energy  it can use right away.  And I obliged it.  Sister Jenny and I have always been fond of each other; I wouldn’t deny her  a reasonable request.

    Ive never been  a thin person (except for a brief Weight Watchers’ assay in my 20s, which, sadly, did not last; apparently it seldom does) and I never will be.  I’m not thin now ( though my BMI is within acceptable limits).  But to have shed the troublesome, slothful 5-7 lbs which bedeviled my wardrobe is, to me, a cause for rejoicing!

    I do like allowing more fat into my diet.

    I was having trouble with a bulge in my mid sock but that is mostly gone.

    Soxy, we call that bulge a “fatted calf”.

    ( I was gonna refrain, but after your “Pyramid scheme” remark…)

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  11. Hypatia:

    10 Cents:

    Hypatia:
    I posted some time ago that I was amazed when I tried eliminating carbs.  I just looked up the Atkin s diet online, no Keto supplements or anything.  Amazed at how much I could eat, of meat,  including bacon, chicken salad, salami, and butter, mayo—and that my “stored” fat, specifically muffin-top  fat, still melted away! Weighing myself after I involuntarily fasted for a day during my “summer ague” , I was almost kinda scared to see that I weighed less than  I had before I got pregnant, less than I had for most of my time in college.

    Every once in a while, as I did the morning I was recovering from the fever, I will feel I really really need a bit o’  Carb,, like my body wants  some food energy  it can use right away.  And I obliged it.  Sister Jenny and I have always been fond of each other; I wouldn’t deny her  a reasonable request.

    Ive never been  a thin person (except for a brief Weight Watchers’ assay in my 20s, which, sadly, did not last; apparently it seldom does) and I never will be.  I’m not thin now ( though my BMI is within acceptable limits).  But to have shed the troublesome, slothful 5-7 lbs which bedeviled my wardrobe is, to me, a cause for rejoicing!

    I do like allowing more fat into my diet.

    I was having trouble with a bulge in my mid sock but that is mostly gone.

    Soxy, we call that bulge a “fatted calf”.

    ( I was gonna refrain, but after your “Pyramid scheme” remark…)

    Luckily, you will pick someone more succulent. May I suggest Damocles. (I want him to feel wanted.)

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  12. For the most part one does not feel hungry because when you fast you are nourished by stored fat. The body wants to eat and knows where the good stuff is. It does get bothersome when the body is searching for “the switch” at times but when it kicks in one feels satiated.

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  13. I have gotten very serious for the last 300 days on a paleo/keto/insulin resistance combo low carb diet, eating mostly good fats and meats plus lots of vegetables. It has moved my blood sugar from borderline type II diabetes to low normal and I have lost considerable weight.

    Rules that work for me.

    1. Must do at least 400 active calories a day of exercise, cardio daily and weights added every other day

    2. I can never eat more than 70 net grams of carbs a day. I average about 45-50.

    3. Dropping wheat and grains has reduced arthritis pain by about 80%

    4. I have added the 16/8 fast, food cycle. I eat only in an 8 hour window and I have moved from three meals to two.  Around 6am I do have ‘bulletproof” coffee with MCT oil and a tsp of ghee to fire up the ketosis. It kills my hunger until 1030 am.

    5. Ignore all food advice I learned growing up about fats, carbs and cholesterol, it was not just wrong, but wrong in the worst direction.

    I have achieved a point where excess carbs or sugar make me feel queasy. I sleep with about 75% being “deep” sleep and I wake up ready to go.

    My cardiologist, kidney specialist and GP are amazed and supportive. They keep throwing more tests at me.

    Cholesterol is down to norm, blood sugar is down to norm, blood pressure is down to almost norm, all chemicals measured are in normal range. All directly related to the last 300 days of diet and exercise.

    Being a crazed control junkie, I track all food eaten, wear sensors  for blood sugar, heart rate, blood oxygen, steps, calories burned, resting and active heart rate, respiration because without feedback I would never change behavior. (I still like gauges on my dashboard. I would like to kill the idiot who invented the ‘engine’ light)

    It was stupid to wait until I was 67 to get serious about this again.

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  14. TKC 1101:
    I have gotten very serious for the last 300 days on a paleo/keto/insulin resistance combo low carb diet, eating mostly good fats and meats plus lots of vegetables. It has moved my blood sugar from borderline type II diabetes to low normal and I have lost considerable weight.

    Rules that work for me.

    1. Must do at least 400 active calories a day of exercise, cardio daily and weights added every other day

    2. I can never eat more than 70 net grams of carbs a day. I average about 45-50.

    3. Dropping wheat and grains has reduced arthritis pain by about 80%

    4. I have added the 16/8 fast, food cycle. I eat only in an 8 hour window and I have moved from three meals to two.  Around 6am I do have ‘bulletproof” coffee with MCT oil and a tsp of ghee to fire up the ketosis. It kills my hunger until 1030 am.

    5. Ignore all food advice I learned growing up about fats, carbs and cholesterol, it was not just wrong, but wrong in the worst direction.

    I have achieved a point where excess carbs or sugar make me feel queasy. I sleep with about 75% being “deep” sleep and I wake up ready to go.

    My cardiologist, kidney specialist and GP are amazed and supportive. They keep throwing more tests at me.

    Cholesterol is down to norm, blood sugar is down to norm, blood pressure is down to almost norm, all chemicals measured are in normal range. All directly related to the last 300 days of diet and exercise.

    Being a crazed control junkie, I track all food eaten, wear sensors  for blood sugar, heart rate, blood oxygen, steps, calories burned, resting and active heart rate, respiration because without feedback I would never change behavior. (I still like gauges on my dashboard. I would like to kill the idiot who invented the ‘engine’ light)

    It was stupid to wait until I was 67 to get serious about this again.

    It is amazing how good the numbers can get and how simple this approach is.

    I feel chagrin that I didn’t know about this earlier.

    Keep it up, TKC.

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  15. 10 Cents:
    Luckily, you will pick someone more succulent. May I suggest Damocles. (I want him to feel wanted.)

    You would be surprised the number of people craving my succulent manflesh!

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  16. 10 Cents:
    I have to give credit to Stu in Tokyo for letting me know about this method and recommending the book “Obesity Code”.

    Yeah sure blame me!!

    im glad it’s working for you.

    Of course I like less of you, but hey, you don’t even live in Tokyo LOL

    Keep being a loser!

    cheers!

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  17. StuInTokyo:

    10 Cents:
    I have to give credit to Stu in Tokyo for letting me know about this method and recommending the book “Obesity Code”.

    Yeah sure blame me!!

    im glad it’s working for you.

    Of course I like less of you, but hey, you don’t even live in Tokyo LOL

    Keep being a loser!

    cheers!

    I noticed you liked your own comment, Stu. You are a brave man. You are doing the job an American would never do.

    I didn’t realize people lived in Tokyo. I thought the subsisted.

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  18. I would like some of the health professionals to weigh in.  How important is it to lose weight? Is diet as important as medicine or more important?

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  19. Well TC I figured I had to like my own post, as people know I know you, and actually tolerate you, so I have no friends to like my posts….. 😉

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  20. StuInTokyo:
    Well TC I figured I had to like my own post, as people know I know you, and actually tolerate you, so I have no friends to like my posts….. 😉

    I liked your current comment. (Someone had too.)

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  21. I think about this all the time:  how lucky we are to be living during a time, and in a place, where,  vis à vis food,  our biggest problem us that we tend to inadvertently eat too much of it!   Incredible.

    One of the  yardsticks for measuring government’s success, perhaps the most important, used to be whether it could secure enough caloric intake for the populace.

    “Solve world hunger!” Seems to have gone the way of “End our dependence on foreign oil!”  Done and done.  Obesity is now a bigger problem worldwide than hunger. (Except for areas where famine is being deliberately engineered.)

    A moment surrendered to gratitude is in order, doncha think?

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