Never Again

Linda Sarsour said some bad things recently.

Apparently, she made the observation that Israel is built on Jewish supremacy.

I wouldn’t necessarily say supremacy. However, Israeli policies concerning Aliyah does bespeak a kind of homogeneity that is being forced out of other parts of the world. For instance, you can’t immigrate to Israel if you are a Christian… even if you are a Jew.

If traditional englishmen dared to claim that England was for traditional englishmen, everyone would claim that they were white supremacists and white nationalists.

So Linda Sarsour is just applying the rhetoric aimed at nationalists in the West to a very ardently nationalist country.

If nationalism = supremacy, which it does to Ben Shapiro, Jonah Goldberg, and a host of other conservative pundits, then Jewish nationalism is Jewish supremacy.

Maybe we should start asking ourselves if there really is something horribly wrong with it or not? Or is it only ok for the Jews? Because of their history?

Something I’ve been becoming embittered about is that I thought “Never Again” applied to all ethnic groups – never again would we let what happened to the Jews happen to anyone. It’s why I thought Holocaust education was important. But we have in this country an active campaign to dehumanize an entire ethnic group as what was done in the decades before the holocaust. But its anti-Semitic to compare the two.

So I have little respect for anyone claiming it is different because they are Jews. No. Either ethnic nationalism is right for everyone or it is right for no one. To argue otherwise IS, in fact, supremacy.

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94 thoughts on “Never Again”

  1. EThompson:
    I may have to respectfully disagree here. Israel may identify as a Jewish state (74% practice Judaism), but it has long welcomed Christians and even Muslims.

    I don’t think you understand what is being argued.

    Israel has laws that actively promote it as a Jewish state, regardless of how accommodating they are to religious minorities.

    Why does pointing that out (and quoting laws) bother you so much? Because it goes against everything you’ve been told is morally right?

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  2. Mate De:
    I’m not sure if Israel functions in the same manner but just because there are other religions that thrive in that country still would make it a Jewish state because that is the dominate religion and laws would have to comply with Jewish law? Is that correct?

    Not historically. After all that would defeat the purpose of “shabbos goys”.

    Recently, things have gotten weird in Israel due to the tension between secular and Orthodox Jews. The latter are trying to impose religiosity on the former. In the proposals, exemptions are made for Christians and Muslims, but that raises two issues: isn’t that officially making Israel a three religion state; and if a Christian does not want to take Saturday off work, must he take Sunday off work?

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  3. Stina:
    Israel has laws that actively promote it as a Jewish state, regardless of how accommodating they are to religious minorities.

    I’m always willing to learn so pls give me specific examples. Would appreciate it!

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  4. One thing of which people viewing Israel from afar may not know is that among the 74.2% of Israelis who consider themselves Jews, there is a whole spectrum of degrees of strict adherence to the religion and customs.  Israelis call the three major groups in English, “Secular” (67%), “Religious” (15%), and “Ultra-Orthodox” (haredi) (15%).  Among the Secular group, 43% describe themselves as fully secular (although most celebrate Passsover and Yom Kippur), and 23% as “traditionalists, but not very religious”.

    Thus, well over a majority of Israelis do not look to religious law as the primary influence in their lives.  Furthermore, the overwhelming majority of leaders in politics, business, and the military are secular.

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  5. John Walker:
    One thing of which people viewing Israel from afar may not know is that among the 74.2% of Israelis who consider themselves Jews, there is a whole spectrum of degrees of strict adherence to the religion and customs.  Israelis call the three major groups in English, “Secular” (67%), “Religious” (15%), and “Ultra-Orthodox” (haredi) (15%).  Among the Secular group, 43% describe themselves as fully secular (although most celebrate Passsover and Yom Kippur), and 23% as “traditionalists, but not very religious”.

    Thus, well over a majority of Israelis do not look to religious law as the primary influence in their lives.  Furthermore, the overwhelming majority of leaders in politics, business, and the military are secular.

    Yes.

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  6. Mate De:
    Not to be too much of a curmudgeon but I don’t understand term “protestant work ethic”.

    Google it. It’s how I’ve lived my entire life and I simply don’t have the energy to explain a fairly pervasive point de vue that founded this country.

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  7. EThompson:

    Mate De:
    Not to be too much of a curmudgeon but I don’t understand term “protestant work ethic”.

    Google it. It’s how I’ve lived my entire life and I simply don’t have the energy to explain a fairly pervasive point de vue that founded this country.

    Just pointing out that The puritan’s did not invent a work ethic that derived from frugality, and discipline. It was already a long established tradition.

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  8. Mate De:

    EThompson:

    Mate De:
    Not to be too much of a curmudgeon but I don’t understand term “protestant work ethic”.

    Google it. It’s how I’ve lived my entire life and I simply don’t have the energy to explain a fairly pervasive point de vue that founded this country.

    Just pointing out that The puritan’s did not invent a work ethic that derived from frugality, and discipline. It was already a long established tradition.

    Frankly, I don’t care who invented it; I appreciate those who implemented it in this country.

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  9. Mate De:

    EThompson:

    Mate De:
    Not to be too much of a curmudgeon but I don’t understand term “protestant work ethic”.

    Google it. It’s how I’ve lived my entire life and I simply don’t have the energy to explain a fairly pervasive point de vue that founded this country.

    Just pointing out that The puritan’s did not invent a work ethic that derived from frugality, and discipline. It was already a long established tradition.

    But less of a tradition in Catholic countries, Mate De. 🙂

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  10. 10 Cents:

    Mate De:

    EThompson:

    Mate De:
    Not to be too much of a curmudgeon but I don’t understand term “protestant work ethic”.

    Google it. It’s how I’ve lived my entire life and I simply don’t have the energy to explain a fairly pervasive point de vue that founded this country.

    Just pointing out that The puritan’s did not invent a work ethic that derived from frugality, and discipline. It was already a long established tradition.

    But less of a tradition in Catholic countries, Mate De. 🙂

    C’est vrai.

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  11. 10 Cents:

    Mate De:

    EThompson:

    Mate De:
    Not to be too much of a curmudgeon but I don’t understand term “protestant work ethic”.

    Google it. It’s how I’ve lived my entire life and I simply don’t have the energy to explain a fairly pervasive point de vue that founded this country.

    Just pointing out that The puritan’s did not invent a work ethic that derived from frugality, and discipline. It was already a long established tradition.

    But less of a tradition in Catholic countries, Mate De. 🙂

    I beg to differ. The Germans and French were both very Catholic and very industrious. I think it may have more to do with some other characteristic besides Catholicism.

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  12. Robert A. McReynolds:

    10 Cents:

    Mate De:

    EThompson:

    Mate De:
    Not to be too much of a curmudgeon but I don’t understand term “protestant work ethic”.

    Google it. It’s how I’ve lived my entire life and I simply don’t have the energy to explain a fairly pervasive point de vue that founded this country.

    Just pointing out that The puritan’s did not invent a work ethic that derived from frugality, and discipline. It was already a long established tradition.

    But less of a tradition in Catholic countries, Mate De. 🙂

    I beg to differ. The Germans and French were both very Catholic and very industrious. I think it may have more to do with some other characteristic besides Catholicism.

    How about the other Catholic countries, Robert? I noticed you mentioned more northern countries. (I want to be proved wrong.)

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  13. Robert A. McReynolds:
    I beg to differ. The Germans and French were both very Catholic and very industrious. I think it may have more to do with some other characteristic besides Catholicism.

    Religion is a very small knob in work ethic.  The big knob is probably opportunity.  I believe capitalistic society with at least a belief in meritocracy will have a much higher work ethic regardless of religious beliefs.

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  14. 10 Cents:
    Robert, how about the current French Work Ethic?

    Prior to the French Revolution the French were very industrious. They build canals to increase trade routes. Colonized parts of North America, Africa and Asia obviously they made beautiful cathedrals. The French are a very hard working, industrious people but the echoes of the revolution still remain today. The yellow vest revolt is evidence of that.
    Americans shouldn’t be too cocky our star can fall the same as any other country.

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  15. JTOmland:

    Robert A. McReynolds:
    I beg to differ. The Germans and French were both very Catholic and very industrious. I think it may have more to do with some other characteristic besides Catholicism.

    Religion is a very small knob in work ethic.  The big knob is probably opportunity.  I believe capitalistic society with at least a belief in meritocracy will have a much higher work ethic regardless of religious beliefs.

    Where do you think meritocracy comes from?

    I think how one views the world matters a lot. One’s religion or lack of it informs their views. I agree that for some people religion is a small knob but I don’t think that is universal or seen throughout history.

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  16. Mate De:

    10 Cents:
    Robert, how about the current French Work Ethic?

    Prior to the French Revolution the French were very industrious. They build canals to increase trade routes. Colonized parts of North America, Africa and Asia obviously they made beautiful cathedrals. The French are a very hard working, industrious people but the echoes of the revolution still remain today. The yellow vest revolt is evidence of that.
    Americans shouldn’t be too cocky our star can fall the same as any other country.

    I was talking about the modern French.
    Why did the French revolt?

     

    LOL, I am smiling at reading in Japan about Americans shouldn’t be cocky. After the war no one thought the Big Three Auto Makers would ever be dethroned. Or that Detroit would fall on bad times.

    In Japan, people have a strong work ethic. Some of it comes from their religion and not wanting to let down their ancestors.

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  17. Mate De:

    10 Cents:
    Robert, how about the current French Work Ethic?

    Prior to the French Revolution the French were very industrious. They build canals to increase trade routes. Colonized parts of North America, Africa and Asia obviously they made beautiful cathedrals. The French are a very hard working, industrious people but the echoes of the revolution still remain today. The yellow vest revolt is evidence of that.
    Americans shouldn’t be too cocky our star can fall the same as any other country.

    Gosh, let’s talk about the French Revolution and compare it to ours because it speaks volumes of the different value systems.

    The American Revolution was about words, declarations, and Paine’s infamous pamphlets. Our violent activity pretty much began and ended with the Boston Tea Party. Meanwhile, the French decided to assassinate their monarchs and priests and actually impaled heads on posts for public viewing.

    Hamilton and Jefferson came to blows over these barbaric actions and you can guess whose side I have taken on this.

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  18. With that said at #69, I will admit some admiration for the French devotion to a STEM education and their total confidence in going nuclear.

    Polytechnique and Ecole Centrales are impressive universities as well.

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  19. Robert A. McReynolds:

    10 Cents:
    Robert, how about the current French Work Ethic?

    I would chalk that up more to cultural exhaustion than solely Catholicism. Not to mention they are still a rather industrious, at least for European standards.

    I noticed you took a long time to answer. I figured you were on strike or taking a long lunch, Robert. 😉 (I wish Blumroch was here because he would put us in our places with humor and style.)

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  20. EThompson:

    Mate De:

    10 Cents:
    Robert, how about the current French Work Ethic?

    Prior to the French Revolution the French were very industrious. They build canals to increase trade routes. Colonized parts of North America, Africa and Asia obviously they made beautiful cathedrals. The French are a very hard working, industrious people but the echoes of the revolution still remain today. The yellow vest revolt is evidence of that.
    Americans shouldn’t be too cocky our star can fall the same as any other country.

    Gosh, let’s talk about the French Revolution and compare it to ours because it speaks volumes of the different value systems.

    The American Revolution was about words, declarations, and Paine’s infamous pamphlets. Our violent activity pretty much began and ended with the Boston Tea Party. Meanwhile, the French decided to assassinate their monarchs and priests and actually impaled heads on posts for public viewing.

    Hamilton and Jefferson came to blows over these barbaric actions and you can guess whose side I have taken on this.

    You do realize that Paine was pamphleteering in France too? Jefferson’s support for the French Revolution was merely based on their desire to throw off monarchy. Jefferson certainly voiced concern over the Terror perpetrated by R. Pierre. But I also will not gloss over Jefferson’s radicalism when it comes to the people revolting against authority.

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  21. Robert A. McReynolds:
    You do realize that Paine was pamphleteering in France too?

    Of course because the Founders were originally in support of the revolution until it turned into a terrorist uprising.

    Jefferson did have a tendency to believe that the ends justify the means.

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  22. EThompson:

    Robert A. McReynolds:
    You do realize that Paine was pamphleteering in France too?

    Of course because the Founders were originally in support of the revolution until it turned into a terrorist uprising.

    Jefferson did have a tendency to believe that the ends justify the means.

    Yes, so long as those ends tended more towards liberty. That is not per se a bad thing. Ham-bone also had an ends-justify-the-means mentality, e.g., the Constitution. There is little argument that the final document from 1787 was something that he opposed. He left the convention within a week of it beginning because he knew his proposed system would not be accepted. He advocated for it because he understood–as would be played out in 1791 with the bank bill–that there were exploitable flaws in the language that could get him where he wanted to go. So ends justifying means is not an indictment of one’s philosophy…unless you disagree with the philosophy.

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