Christmas Cheer, according to George S. Patton, Jr.

Patton was a serious man, and thankfully he left behind two missives that defined his leadership within the realm of Christmas during the legendary Battle of the Bulge.  First is the prayer he commissioned from Third Army Chaplain Msgr. Francis O’Neill for better fighting weather and then his personal Christmas greeting to his troops.  As the Commander of the Third Army, as a Lieutenant General (three stars, like Flynn), and as a God fearing man, he spoke from his heart with a two-part Christmas message to his Army.

“Almighty and most merciful Father, we humbly beseech Thee, of Thy great goodness, to restrain these immoderate rains with which we have had to contend. Grant us fair weather for Battle. Graciously hearken to us as soldiers who call Thee that, armed with Thy power, we may advance from victory to victory, and crush the oppression and wickedness of our enemies, and establish Thy justice among men and nations. Amen.”  Then his greeting:  “To each officer and soldier in the Third United States Army, I wish a Merry Christmas. I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty, and skill in battle. We march in our might to complete victory. May God’s blessings rest upon each of you on this Christmas Day. -G.S. Patton, Jr. Lieutenant General, Commanding, Third United States Army.”

https://townhall.com/columnists/larryprovost/2019/12/15/the-story-of-general-pattons-prayer-n2557760

10+
avataravataravataravataravataravataravataravataravatar

4 thoughts on “Christmas Cheer, according to George S. Patton, Jr.”

  1. 10 Cents:
    Don’t you just love the King James language in these prayers!

    I read somewhere about how the language of the KJV heavily influenced a lot of American English.  The speeches and private letters of our founding fathers was redolent in its KJV.

    4+
    avataravataravataravatar
  2. Haakon Dahl:

    10 Cents:
    Don’t you just love the King James language in these prayers!

    I read somewhere about how the language of the KJV heavily influenced a lot of American English.  The speeches and private letters of our founding fathers was redolent in its KJV.

    For many families in might have been their only book. The primers used Bible verses I think too.

    2+
    avataravatar
  3. My father spent that Christmas in a boxcar on the way to a German prison camp. He had almost exclusively fun and entertaining stories about the time in a boxcar and prison camp overall. There were no doubt other stories but he did not tell them; I think that was an expression of manliness then (and now.)

    5+
    avataravataravataravataravatar

Leave a Reply