Nubia

There’s an exhibition at Boston’s art museum on Nubia. This is a region that includes parts of Egypt and Sudan along the Nile. The exhibition “…examines power, representation, and cultural bias—in the ancient world, in the early 20th century, and today.” The principal focus of the explanatory materials is race. Visitors are lectured about how Nubians weren’t really Egyptians but were actually black, that one should not fall prey to stereotypes and that race is a social construct. Or as Derb would say, “blackety black blackety blackety black.”

The point of the exhibition seemed to be to connect Egyptian cultural achievements with sub-Saharan Africa. Quote from the exhibition blurb:

As a result, their [Nubian] story has been told in large part by others—in antiquity by the Egyptians, who used propaganda to cast Nubia as the barbaric “other,” and in the early 20th century by American and European scholars and archeologists who brought cultural bias to their work.

Is this thing for real or just another bit of post-modernist revisionism? If only we had an archeologist among us who could shed some light on this. Oh, wait, we do. Help!

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Author: King-elect

photon whisperer & quantum mechanic

14 thoughts on “Nubia”

  1. As a result, their [Nubian] story has been told in large part by others—

    Isn’t that any civilization that didn’t have a written language?

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  2. Mate De:

    As a result, their [Nubian] story has been told in large part by others—

    Isn’t that any civilization that didn’t have a written language?

    I think these guys did have a written language, allegedly.

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  3. Is the adjective Nubian or Nubile?

    Would I be wrong to assume that the place a culture was in affected the color of the skin? Global positioning matters. It also changes the amount of work that can be done.  It is the Goldilocks Effect. Some places are too hot or too cold.

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  4. Calling Roxie !

    Here is an archaeology site that focuses on Sudan:

    https://issuu.com/sudarchrs

    Here is an article at Boston Globe about the current exhibit.   The article is behind their paywall, but the headline tells the story:
    ‘Ancient Nubia Now’ corrects the record on the MFA’s African art collection
    George Reisner gave the MFA the best collection of Nubian objects in the world. He also saddled it with a racist stain that the museum is determined to undo.
    https://www.bostonglobe.com/2019/10/24/arts/ancient-nubia-now-corrects-record-mfas-african-art-collection/

    The beef is that over a century ago Egyptologists were all British, French, German and American, and they simply assumed that a society comprised of black Africans in Sudan would have to be inferior to the grand things they found in Egypt.

    It turns out that there were older things in Egypt, but they have not survived, in large part because later Egyptians repurposed carved stones for their own works.   It also turns out that there is much to be explored in Sudan, which is still there primarily because it is so hard to get to and so hard to find under the desert sands.

    The new exciting finds from Sudan date from three or four millennia BC.

    Here is another article.   But the site I linked at the top of this comment is where you could really learn stuff.   The exhibit teaser site has some interesting things also.

    https://undark.org/2018/02/19/nubia-sudan-amara-west-archaeology/

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  5. drlorentz:
    Visitors are lectured about how Nubians weren’t really Egyptians but were actually black, that one should not fall prey to stereotypes and that race is a social construct.

    How is someone actually black if race is a social construct?

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  6. Henry Castaigne:

    drlorentz:
    Visitors are lectured about how Nubians weren’t really Egyptians but were actually black, that one should not fall prey to stereotypes and that race is a social construct.

    How is someone actually black if race is a social construct?

    You obviously have not studied the sacred texts of the Church of Woke.

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  7. Apparently, this exhibit is part of a larger movement at the Boston museum and others that the Boston Globe refers to as an “apology tour.”

    Maybe it’s just me, but the Museum of Fine Arts’ 150th anniversary next year is starting to feel as festive as a ritual of self-flagellation. Its grand announcement, convened last month for both press and the museum world alike, was a solemn affair; its plans, step by step, read as unvarnished repentance. To kick things off, the museum opened “Women Take the Floor” in September , a sprawling apology for its poor performance over the decades in collecting and showing the work of women (there’s even an admission, right up there on the museum’s wall: Less than 4 percent of the 90,215 works the MFA acquired between 2008 and 2018 were by women). “Ancient Nubia Now,” a display of the MFA’s prized collection from the ancient African civilization that opened just this week, leads off by acknowledging the “racial prejudice” scholars brought to the study of Nubia from the beginning — including, it concedes, the museum’s own.

    The museums are fully converged.

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  8. 10 Cents:
    Is the adjective Nubian or Nubile?

    Would I be wrong to assume that the place a culture was in affected the color of the skin? Global positioning matters. It also changes the amount of work that can be done.  It is the Goldilocks Effect. Some places are too hot or too cold.

    DO NOT GOOGLE “NUBILE”.  Did it at work to settle an argument.  Immediately provided links and hasty explanation to security.

    But I was right.  OFFICIALLY, it just means marriageable.

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  9. drlorentz:
    Apparently, this exhibit is part of a larger movement at the Boston museum and others that the Boston Globe refers to as an “apology tour.”

    Maybe it’s just me, but the Museum of Fine Arts’ 150th anniversary next year is starting to feel as festive as a ritual of self-flagellation. Its grand announcement, convened last month for both press and the museum world alike, was a solemn affair; its plans, step by step, read as unvarnished repentance. To kick things off, the museum opened “Women Take the Floor” in September , a sprawling apology for its poor performance over the decades in collecting and showing the work of women (there’s even an admission, right up there on the museum’s wall: Less than 4 percent of the 90,215 works the MFA acquired between 2008 and 2018 were by women). “Ancient Nubia Now,” a display of the MFA’s prized collection from the ancient African civilization that opened just this week, leads off by acknowledging the “racial prejudice” scholars brought to the study of Nubia from the beginning — including, it concedes, the museum’s own.

    The museums are fully converged.

    This is to be expected, unless you are provisioning a Museum of Mediocrity.  The “greater male variability hypothesis“, which is well-supported by studies which aren’t smothered in a bathtub for obviously galloping off the reservation, predicts that almost anything worthy of putting in a museum will have a male origin.

    Note that women would own the mediocre space, not the inferior space, as that too, is populated overwhelmingly by men.  Stupid females cannot hold a candle to the awesome, bloodline-changing stupidity of males.  How many women have you ever seen in the Darwin Awards?  Women have better sense than the most spectacularly self-filtering males.

    Annnnd, I’m going to continue this in a separate thread… INSERT LINK HERE

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  10. drlorentz:

    Mate De:

    As a result, their [Nubian] story has been told in large part by others—

    Isn’t that any civilization that didn’t have a written language?

    I think these guys did have a written language, allegedly.

    It’s all Greek to me.

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