This Week’s Book Review – Ghost Galleon

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.

Book Review

‘Ghost Galleon’ a treasure trove of history, archaeology

By MARK LARDAS

Jan 11, 2020

“Ghost Galleon: The Discovery and Archaeology of the San Juanillo on the Shores of Baja California” by Edward P. Von der Porten, Texas A&M University Press, 2019, 248 pages, $60

In 1997, San Francisco-based Edward Von der Porten, a noted marine archaeologist, learned of an unknown Manila galleon wreck on California’s coast. The discovery led to a hunt for the wreck and 20 years studying it.

Von der Porten’s “Ghost Galleon: The Discovery and Archaeology of the San Juanillo on the Shores of Baja California” captures the result of that effort.

One of Von der Porten’s study areas was Chinese porcelain, a frequent cargo in the Manila galleons. These returned to Mexico with Far East goods: porcelains, silks, beeswax and spices. He previously studied the porcelains captured from the Spanish but abandoned by Francis Drake near San Francisco Bay. When he saw a photograph of a plate described as “excavated from an unpublished site off the California coast,” he recognized it as from a wrecked Manila Galleon. He sought out the discoverers of the plate, who showed him where they had found it.

The site, in Baja, California, yielded hundreds more Chinese porcelain potsherds on Von der Porten’s first expedition. The mix of different styles indicated it was one of the earliest galleons in this trade. Study could yield much knowledge about the Manila galleons, 16th-century China and the Philippines.

The book describes Von der Porten’s two-decade effort extracting the secrets of the wrecked galleon, including its identity. He visited the site at least every other year, studying the objects discovered. Readers follow as he pieces together the ship’s name, its history and its cargo from the fragments of porcelain, blocks of wax and metal fragments.

“Ghost Galleon” contains chapters describing the ship, its background and the 16th-century transpacific trade. It’s an adventure, describing the ups and down of both the San Juanillo’s crew and the archaeologists trying to untangle its mysteries.

It’s also a family story. Von der Porten was accompanied by his wife, a son, a grandson, and daughters-in-law on the numerous expeditions (the grandson eventually became a marine archaeologist). Lavishly illustrated, “Ghost Galleon” is a marvelous tale for those fascinated by old ships or stories of people working together on a hunt of discovery.

Mark Lardas, an engineer, freelance writer, amateur historian, and model-maker, lives in League City. His website is marklardas.com.

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2 thoughts on “This Week’s Book Review – Ghost Galleon”

  1. Can’t remember whether you reviewed the two dive books, one on the German U-boat found in about 210 feet of water off the shore of New Jersey. The other was a search for the final resting place of one of the pirate ships (?Blackbeards perhaps) in the Caribbean. Both were interesting.

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  2. Devereaux:
    Can’t remember whether you reviewed the two dive books, one on the German U-boat found in about 210 feet of water off the shore of New Jersey. The other was a search for the final resting place of one of the pirate ships (?Blackbeards perhaps) in the Caribbean. Both were interesting.

    Did not. Missed them when they came out, and I review current books (less than one year old) for the Galveston paper.

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