TOTD 2020-1-24: Who was that masked man?

Are you now wearing or have you ever worn a surgical type mask in public?

In Japan, people wear masks around allergy, cold, and flu season. Sometimes it is for prevention of getting something and at other times it is to prevent giving something. What do you think of the practice?

If worn should one go for style or basic function?
Here is an example of a stylish mask.

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34 thoughts on “TOTD 2020-1-24: Who was that masked man?”

  1. drlorentz:

    John Walker:
    People who over-winter in Antarctica speak of the phenomenon where, as the last summer flights depart, there’s a period of around two weeks where everybody recovers from their colds and builds immunity to everybody else’s bugs, and then for the rest of the winter they’re free of the nose rhinos.  Then spring comes and the flights resume, and look out—it’s sneeze season again.

    In The Friendly Arctic, Stefánsson tells of how different parties of arctic explorers would catch each other’s colds when they crossed paths.

    Were they wearing fur lined surgical masks? I bet not.

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  2. Robert A. McReynolds:
    I actually wore one the first time the other day when I went to the doctor with a terrible fever. Turns out I had strep throat. It made my wife feel better for me to wear it in the car as we had our son with us and I certainly did not want him to get strep.

    The doctor’s waiting room is a great place to collect germs.   Wearing a mask there is probably a very good idea.

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  3. John Walker:

    Kozak:
    Yeah, those masks don’t really work.   If you want a mask that works you need an N95 mask.  You can get them at medical supply houses or hardware stores.

    I have a friend who regularly wears N95 surgical masks (which you can order on Amazon) on airline flights.  He says it dramatically reduces the incidence of the post-flight cold, particularly on long flights where the dehydration compounds with the effects of recirculated air.  He says that people look at him funny, but if you knew him, you’d understand how little he cares about that.

    I always take 3 grams of Vitamin C for 2 days before and after an airline flight (as opposed to 1 gram normally).  You may think this a-Pauling, but I haven’t been nailed by a post-flight cold in around 8 years.

    People who over-winter in Antarctica speak of the phenomenon where, as the last summer flights depart, there’s a period of around two weeks where everybody recovers from their colds and builds immunity to everybody else’s bugs, and then for the rest of the winter they’re free of the nose rhinos.  Then spring comes and the flights resume, and look out—it’s sneeze season again.

    Oh, I always used to get terrible sinus  infections after a flight.  One time in France I remember thinking it was so tragic: I couldn’t smell or taste the wonderful food—it was like being in a movie about France.

    And I also used to get them after our annual college friends reunion.  I knew that was exposure to bugs from different regions.

    And then, the worst: having a child in kindergarten.  Those li’l bozos are the irresistible vectors for all kinds of murrains.

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  4. Hypatia:
    a child in kindergarten

    Or a child in elementary school, or a child in middle school, or a child in high school.

    My whole family became instantly healthier the day we started homeschooling.

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