19 thoughts on “Food for thought…..”

  1. I looooove this!   My fave such phrase ever was “ breeches of propriety beneath the cloak of discretion”. I also once heard someone say another person lacked “pistache”.

    my adult reading students were particularly prone to such phrases,  having never seen the words spelled out.  “Flea bargain.” “Oldtimer’s disease.”

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  2. Oh god I love “damp squid”!

    Sometimes these malapropisms can be almost witty. “Embarking up the wrong tree”, f’rinstance.

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  3. 10 Cents:

    G.D.:

    10 Cents:
    Where did you find this, Gerry?

    Well, I DO browse around the web more than here.

    It is good to give credit if one can to the writer. It is well done.

    I wish I knew where it originally came from, I will research it. But this copy of the image, well it came from a general area of Facebook.

    10 Cents, this looks like a lost cause in finding the origin. A search on Google resulted with thousands of results. I’m sorry.

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  4. This sort of thing happens a lot in the newspapers.  Big Media forced all the old reporters into retirement, getting rid of journalists who actually knew stuff.

    So, for example, we get the WashPo [edit: NYT] reporter who described the cardinal processing with his crow’s ear.

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  5. MJBubba:
    This sort of thing happens a lot in the newspapers.  Big Media forced all the old reporters into retirement, getting rid of journalists who actually knew stuff.

    So, for example, we get the WashPo reporter who described the cardinal processing with his crow’s ear.

    I DO NOT believe this!!!!😂😂😂

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  6. Hypatia:

    MJBubba:
    This sort of thing happens a lot in the newspapers.  Big Media forced all the old reporters into retirement, getting rid of journalists who actually knew stuff.

    So, for example, we get the WashPo reporter who described the cardinal processing with his crow’s ear.

    I DO NOT believe this!!!!😂😂😂

    OK, OK, I looked it up.  Sure enough, I had it wrong.  It wasn’t WashPo, it was the New York Times, describing the funeral of Pope John Paul II.

    “The 84-year-old John Paul was laid out in Clementine Hall, dressed in white and red vestments, his head covered with a white bishop’s miter and propped up on three dark gold pillows,” wrote Ian Fisher of the New York Times. “Tucked under his left arm was the silver staff, called the crow’s ear, that he had carried in public.”

    http://www.tmatt.net/columns/2006/04/year-17-reporters-crows-ears-karma-light-nuns

    From that same article, here is another excerpt:

    This is the kind of error that believers love to cite as evidence that too many journalists don’t know which way is up when it comes to religion. Believe me, I receive more than my share of emails offering other examples. Did a BBC producer really write a subtitle saying that “Karma Light” nuns had gathered to mourn the pope?

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  7. MJBubba:
    Did a BBC producer really write a subtitle saying that “Karma Light” nuns had gathered to mourn the pope?

    Even this secular Protestant knows better than to call a Carmelite … Karma Light. The ignorance here isn’t even worthy of a snark.

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  8. MJBubba:

    Hypatia:

    MJBubba:
    This sort of thing happens a lot in the newspapers.  Big Media forced all the old reporters into retirement, getting rid of journalists who actually knew stuff.

    So, for example, we get the WashPo reporter who described the cardinal processing with his crow’s ear.

    I DO NOT believe this!!!!😂😂😂

    OK, OK, I looked it up.  Sure enough, I had it wrong.  It wasn’t WashPo, it was the New York Times, describing the funeral of Pope John Paul II.

    “The 84-year-old John Paul was laid out in Clementine Hall, dressed in white and red vestments, his head covered with a white bishop’s miter and propped up on three dark gold pillows,” wrote Ian Fisher of the New York Times. “Tucked under his left arm was the silver staff, called the crow’s ear, that he had carried in public.”

    http://www.tmatt.net/columns/2006/04/year-17-reporters-crows-ears-karma-light-nuns

    From that same article, here is another excerpt:

    This is the kind of error that believers love to cite as evidence that too many journalists don’t know which way is up when it comes to religion. Believe me, I receive more than my share of emails offering other examples. Did a BBC producer really write a subtitle saying that “Karma Light” nuns had gathered to mourn the pope?

    You are KILLING me!!😂😂😂😂😂😂😂

    …..but oh!  If only it had been “Karma Lite”…

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