Airbus unveils ‘blended wing body’ plane design

Airbus unveils ‘blended wing body’ plane design after secret flight tests

I dunno, where are the passenger windows?

6+
avataravataravataravataravataravatar

Author: G.D.

I'm from Pensyltucky. Can trace my ancestry directly to whom the present day national anthem of Poland is written about.

16 thoughts on “Airbus unveils ‘blended wing body’ plane design”

  1. ctlaw:
    What is this? A plane for ants?!

    What are the problems with this design, CT?

    A normal wing flexes. This doesn’t look like it will flex. Is that important? I think the flexing absorbs things so it makes for a more comfortable flight.

    1+
    avatar
  2. G.D.:
    I dunno, where are the passenger windows?

    Aircraft designers have been wanting to get rid of windows for a long time.  They’re heavy, especially in the added structure that’s needed to compensate for a non-stress-bearing hole in the fuselage.  They’re also a maintenance headache.  The argument is that on many current wide-body planes the fraction of the seats who can actually look out of a window is already small.  Windows are also a bone of contention with the customers between those who want to look out and those who want to pull down the shade.

    Here is a proposal for a business jet with virtual windows which essentially makes the airplane transparent to passengers.

    Emirates is already installing virtual windows in their first class middle suites on long-haul 777s.

    5+
    avataravataravataravataravatar
  3. John Walker:
    Emirates is already installing virtual windows in their first class middle suites on long-haul 777s.

    In the spirit of Brexit, British Airways should program its virtual windows on flights to the continent to simulate a wing of Lancaster bombers.

    7+
    avataravataravataravataravataravataravatar
  4. 10 Cents:

    ctlaw:
    What is this? A plane for ants?!

    What are the problems with this design, CT?

    A normal wing flexes. This doesn’t look like it will flex. Is that important? I think the flexing absorbs things so it makes for a more comfortable flight.

    1+
    avatar
  5. ctlaw:

    10 Cents:

    ctlaw:
    What is this? A plane for ants?!

    What are the problems with this design, CT?

    A normal wing flexes. This doesn’t look like it will flex. Is that important? I think the flexing absorbs things so it makes for a more comfortable flight.

    I got the joke. I wondered if you studied about flying wings.

    1+
    avatar
  6. Manufacturers have been discussing blended wing bodies for decades. There are lots of problems.

    First, cylindrical fuselages are very simple pressure vessels. The fuselage of a blended wing aircraft is quite complex in its stress behavior. It is almost guaranteed that any design will eventually experience premature structural failure somewhere.

    Engine location creates a lot of problems. Noise prevents integration of the engines into the fuselage in distinction to military aircraft. Additionally, access to the engines for maintenance is a problem if they are anywhere other than under wing.

    Location of passenger and cargo doors is an issue.

    Also, anything approaching manual control is impossible.

    3+
    avataravataravatar
  7. drlorentz:

    ctlaw:
    What is this? A plane for ants?!

    Why not? There are ants in space. Why not have ants on a plane?

    Somehow it don’t seem like it would make for a good movie, on the other hand “Snakes on a Plane” wasn’t a good movie either.

    0

  8. “Blended wing body?” It’s called a lifting body and the concept has been around for over a century. It is inefficient at low airspeed — too much drag for the lift — so it went into the “not yet” bin. NASA started goofing around with it in the early 60s.

    4+
    avataravataravataravatar
  9. Percival:
    “Blended wing body?” It’s called a lifting body and the concept has been around for over a century. It is inefficient at low airspeed — too much drag for the lift — so it went into the “not yet” bin. NASA started goofing around with it in the early 60s.

    Did any one see changes to the leading edges at slow speeds?

    0

Leave a Reply