Baking an Onion

This is one each big yellow onion, two chops (top and bottom), and a little hollow dig into the top, filled with grass-fed butter and covered with oregano.
Oven preheated  320F, cold pan with a plop of avocado oil.  Letting it go forty minutes.  Goal is to slow bake it.
It should be creamy, herb-y, sweet and more than a little messy.

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14 thoughts on “Baking an Onion”

  1. Long story short, I could have let it go for about an hour.  I deliberately went low on temp and used a cold pan in order that it not simply fry from the feet on up, and to give it as much opportunity to become roasted in its own juices (and butter), rather than just a damn hot onion.

    The outer layers were just what I wanted, but inside, it was more hot onion than baked tasty thing.  So I added butter to the pan and am no frying the thoroughly wedged onion (cut like an orange and the spread about the pan).

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  2. Man!  Food coma KNOCKED ME OUT!

    This particular video squashed something, so that the naturally synth-y distorted sound washing the whole thing is exaggerated into a hiss on the vocals and a relentless blown-speaker effect on the synth.

    Compression — like onion — is great in moderation.

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  3. Robert A. McReynolds:
    Haak where is the meat? I know there have been some cuts here and there for the military but I didn’t think it was that bad! Seriously though, that looks and sounds amazing.

    I hear ya.  I eat so much meat that I am actually trying to come up with things to put WITH it.   Then this onion thing dropped out of the internet like a polyp from the head of Zeus, and I had to try it — three weeks later…

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  4. Don’t let the knife fool you.  All I did with that was smash some garlic.  I got six chicken breasts in a value pack, and set about freezing.  I packaged five, and cooked one right then and there –visible trying to hide behind the “soy” sauce.

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  5. Robert A. McReynolds:
    Haak where is the meat?

    When I make roasted meat, such as Chinese Roast Pork or Easter Roast Goat, I always cut an onion in half and place it on top of the roast.  Its juices marinate the meat as it cooks, and the wafteromes from the roast season the onion.  When you cook it the Fourmilab way (220° C for 75 minutes) both will be perfect.

    I’ve never tried roasting an onion by itself.  I’d probably try doing it in a small glass casserole to keep it from drying out, and adding some seasoning such as lardons.  I’m glad to see it worked out—I’d guess that the butter kept the oven roasting from drying it out too much.

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  6. John Walker:

    Robert A. McReynolds:
    Haak where is the meat?

    When I make roasted meat, such as Chinese Roast Pork or Easter Roast Goat, I always cut an onion in half and place it on top of the roast.  Its juices marinate the meat as it cooks, and the wafteromes from the roast season the onion.  When you cook it the Fourmilab way (220° C for 75 minutes) both will be perfect.

    I’ve never tried roasting an onion by itself.  I’d probably try doing it in a small glass casserole to keep it from drying out, and adding some seasoning such as lardons.  I’m glad to see it worked out—I’d guess that the butter kept the oven roasting from drying it out too much.

    John, I like your idea so much that next time I roast an onion I’m going to cut a goat in half and throw that in there too.

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