I LOVE Mayonnaise!

Just a bit of nothing, to season some of the heavy commenting on things political or important.

I love mayonnaise. I put it on sandwiches, and even on strange things like rice. I learned in high school to eat what was called a “peanut between with”. It was the cheapest thing you could buy at the grill, and consisted of peanut butter “between” two pieces of toast – WITH – mayonnaise! It’s delicious, especially at 10:15 in the morning when you’re a starving teenager.Lunch wasn’t until 1:00 PM.

I still put it on my peanut butter sandwiches. I put it on burgers (when I eat them – usually 1/2 these days as I can’t eat that much). I eat cooked rice with mayonnaise on the side. All my friends and their wives know this and if at dinner at their homes and there’s rice, I get a little side dish of mayo by my plate.

When I started hunting my wife made the ultimatum that if I killed it, I had to cook it. So I taught myself how to cook. I learned about rues, about brazing, about making chili, about different seasonings (I put some sage, among other things, in burgers I make). AND I learned to make this killer “potato salad” from my grandmother’s cookbook. It requires you make the mayonnaise, and that absolutely MAKES the dish.

So now with time on my hands, if I’m not being lazy I will make up a batch (relatively small) of mayo. I usually use lemon rather than vinegar to blanch it, but either is OK. I have even used things like wine vinegar, although I haven’t been so bold as to try balsamic vinegar as the astringent.

I have also taken to making crab cakes because I love the taste and they are great for lunch or dinner. And I make a quick-and-dirty aioli sauce that only uses mayonnaise, lemon juice, and garlic cloves. No need to beat the dedickens out of the mayo and garlic to make an “authentic” aioli sauce; this works nicely. One of these days I will make the mayo from scratch for this, to see if it makes a difference.

?What little idiosyncratic food do you guys love.

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20 thoughts on “I LOVE Mayonnaise!”

  1. I sincerely hope you’re one of those lanky types with a high metabolism. Mayonnaise and peanut butter sandwiches, oh my! Rice with mayonnaise!!

    I have a good one for you- cornbread sticks fried in lard. Yes, I admit to inhaling these as a kid with a southern mother but those days are long gone. Arugula salad with hearts of palm and a teaspoon of olive oil is my current appetizer du jour. Grilled flounder with lemon juice and asparagus for main. It used to sound boring but after all this time, the thought of a Big Mac makes me nauseous. 🙂

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  2. Can’t say I’m crazy about Big Macs either. But in those days I was on the varsity crew. Crew burns about 14.5 cal/min, so rowing for a couple hours burned some real calories. This on top of that of normal, healthy teenage boys (about 22-2400 cal per day). And remember, I entered high school at age 13, being 6’ tall and weighing 167 lbs. So I was not a small guy. Didn’t grow much after that, but put on muscle – and learned to use my body more co-ordinatedly. And lastly a small town in New Hampshire didn’t really have much to offer by way of junk food in the early 60’s.

    I don’t eat that much today. We just had swordfish steak, one of my favorites, and I couldn’t finish a half pound steak and some peas. I manage to hold my weight within a couple lbs fluctuation. But the gym must be doing something because while my weight is steady my pants are getting looser.

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  3. Recently I started eating natto which is fermented soy beans. They add an interesting taste to things. I add it to eggs or salad. It is also high on nutrition.

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  4. EThompson:
    I sincerely hope you’re one of those lanky types with a high metabolism. Mayonnaise and peanut butter sandwiches, oh my! Rice with mayonnaise!!

    I have a good one for you- cornbread sticks fried in lard. Yes, I admit to inhaling these as a kid with a southern mother but those days are long gone. Arugula salad with hearts of palm and a teaspoon of olive oil is my current appetizer du jour. Grilled flounder with lemon juice and asparagus for main. It used to sound boring but after all this time, the thought of a Big Mac makes me nauseous. 🙂

    ?So what do you order when you go out to a nice restaurant and splurge.

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  5. Devereaux:
    I love mayonnaise.

    Moi aussi.  I spent the better part of six months, off and on, (mostly off) reverse-engineering a blue cheese salad dressing that I’d become accustomed to in California but which I couldn’t get in Switzerland.  In the article, I noted that “it’s mostly mayonnaise”.  An actual French chef responded that, from his experience as a «saucier», essentially every sauce was more or less mayonnaise or tomato sauce with “secret ingredients”.  I love ’em both.

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  6. Devereaux:

    EThompson:
    I sincerely hope you’re one of those lanky types with a high metabolism. Mayonnaise and peanut butter sandwiches, oh my! Rice with mayonnaise!!

    I have a good one for you- cornbread sticks fried in lard. Yes, I admit to inhaling these as a kid with a southern mother but those days are long gone. Arugula salad with hearts of palm and a teaspoon of olive oil is my current appetizer du jour. Grilled flounder with lemon juice and asparagus for main. It used to sound boring but after all this time, the thought of a Big Mac makes me nauseous. 🙂

    ?So what do you order when you go out to a nice restaurant and splurge.

    That is a great question and the answer is that we frequent 3 restaurants regularly and are allowed to “redesign” the menu. Because we live in Florida, we have access to lots of good fish which we always order broiled plainly with lemon slices on the side, substitute fries/potatoes with steamed asparagus/broccoli and ask for salads with dressing on the side. My favorite dish in the whole wide world is seafood paella but our local Italian restaurant serves it on a bed of pasta (a no-no) so they’ll accommodate me with all seafood and no spaghettini with a small surcharge.

    Ah-Ha! I  knew I was right figuring you were tall …

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  7. I recently took a liking to menemen, which is a savory Turkish egg dish that’s usually eaten for breakfast. The only place near me that has it is a bakery down the street; they also make a fabulous baguette (bread comes with). Menemen is a bit like huevos rancheros but more stew-like. This is a hearty breakfast that will keep you going all day. This is important because breakfast is my main meal.

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  8. EThompson:
    Ah-Ha! I  knew I was right figuring you were tall …

    “Tall”is relative. My great grandfather was 2 meters (about 6’7”) tall. I’m no where near to that category. But my son is 6’3-1/2” tall. Try finding cars that fit that size well. My Corvettes were both tight for him. The old 911 worked, though.

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  9. drlorentz:
    I recently took a liking to menemen, which is a savory Turkish egg dish that’s usually eaten for breakfast. The only place near me that has it is a bakery down the street; they also make a fabulous baguette (bread comes with). Menemen is a bit like huevos rancheros but more stew-like. This is a hearty breakfast that will keep you going all day. This is important because breakfast is my main meal.

    ?Do they use ghee in the preparation or with the bread.

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  10. Devereaux:

    PhCheese:
    I have switched from mayonnaise to cultured butter.

    ?Do you make your own or buy already made. ?If the latter, which brand.

    I have a question for you mayonnaise lovers. How come store-bought mayonnaise is white? When I was a kid, my mother made mayonnaise at home and it was very yellow, presumably because of the egg yolks. First time I tried commercial mayonnaise I was sorely disappointed.

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  11. Devereaux:

    drlorentz:
    I recently took a liking to menemen, which is a savory Turkish egg dish that’s usually eaten for breakfast. The only place near me that has it is a bakery down the street; they also make a fabulous baguette (bread comes with). Menemen is a bit like huevos rancheros but more stew-like. This is a hearty breakfast that will keep you going all day. This is important because breakfast is my main meal.

    ?Do they use ghee in the preparation or with the bread.

    In the stew itself. The bread is just a regular baguette, well, just a part of one. It’s very rich.

    Picture of menemen from the restaurant. Can confirm that it is accurate.

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  12. drlorentz:

    Devereaux:

    PhCheese:
    I have switched from mayonnaise to cultured butter.

    ?Do you make your own or buy already made. ?If the latter, which brand.

    I have a question for you mayonnaise lovers. How come store-bought mayonnaise is white? When I was a kid, my mother made mayonnaise at home and it was very yellow, presumably because of the egg yolks. First time I tried commercial mayonnaise I was sorely disappointed.

    When you use vinegar to blanch, it turns white. Also it probably doesn’t have yellow mustard in it.

    In parts of France where friges are not widespread like here, women often make a batch of mayonnaise each morning, to use for the day. Some will use the whole egg, but most (I think) use only the yolk.

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  13. “When this girl at the museum asked me whom I like better, Monet or Manet, I said, “I like mayonnaise.” She just stared at me, so I said it again, louder. Then she left. I guess…to find some mayonnaise for me.”

    — Jack Handey

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  14. I love x100 mayonnaise, much to the despair of those around me.  Making your own is pretty easy as you know.  My first thought about balsamic vinegar is, “Nope” but that’s largely due to the goofy color that could result.  I bet it would taste great though.

    There are places in the world where the condiment for French Fries is mayonnaise.  How civilized.

    Mayonnaise, mayonnaise, mayonnaise.  Yum.

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  15. Susan in Seattle:
    Making your own is pretty easy as you know.

    Indeed.  But if you want to make your own, the key thing is getting pasturised eggs (or making your own, which I would not trust myself to do).  Otherwise, you run the risk of salmonella which is not fun and, if you’re aged or young, possibly Game Over.

    In Switzerland, I can buy mayonnaise in a tube made from pasteurised raw eggs and (less than 100%) olive oil, and it’s close enough to the real thing that all of the fuss in getting the last 5% isn’t worth it for me.

    Your kilometrage may vary.

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