TOTD 2020-2-17: Why so biased?

I was thinking why are we so in favor of one side. We have two hands but all the dexterity is on the “right” side.  I put right in quotes because the strong side is sometimes on the left.

Out of curiosity how many of you are even-handed? How strong is your weak side?

For a challenge try writing with your opposite hand 5 minutes a day for a week. See how bad or good you are.

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43 thoughts on “TOTD 2020-2-17: Why so biased?”

  1. 10 Cents:
    Why so biased?

    The term you’re looking for is not “biased”, but rather “chiral”, the distinction between left- and right-handedness, a word coined by Lord Kelvin in 1894.

    Chirality occurs everywhere in the universe,  Almost all of the molecules of biology are chiral: if you replace them with their mirror images, they either do nothing or have a pernicious effect.  In particle physics, the neutrino occurs only as a left-handed particle.

    When I was a kid (fifth or sixth grade), I taught myself to do mirror writing, Leonardo-style, with my left hand.  I got pretty good at it, and even recognised that when I viewed the writing in a mirror it had some of the same features of my normal handwriting with the right hand.  I decided that skill would not advance my ultimate career as a WordPress administrator, so I let it lapse.

    Prior to 1956, it had been thought that all of the laws of physics were invariant under a change of parity (or chiral transformation, or mirror reflexion).  But experiment showed this to be incorrect: the weak interaction, such as beta decay, violates parity and hence the universe (at least for matter, as opposed to antimatter, and time flowing forward) has a preferred handedness.

    In the macro-world, the distinction between left and right is more obvious than in quantum mechanics.  Left invariably ends up with prison camps, starvation, and mountains of skulls, while right leads to prosperity, freedom, immortality, and the stars.

    Choose wisely.

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  2. John Walker:

    10 Cents:
    Why so biased?

    The term you’re looking for is not “biased”, but rather “chiral”, the distinction between left- and right-handedness, a word coined by Lord Kelvin in 1894.

    Chirality occurs everywhere in the universe,  Almost all of the molecules of biology are chiral: if you replace them with their mirror images, they either do nothing or have a pernicious effect.  In particle physics, the neutrino occurs only as a left-handed particle.

    When I was a kid (fifth or sixth grade), I taught myself to do mirror writing, Leonardo-style, with my left hand.  I got pretty good at it, and even recognised that when I viewed the writing in a mirror it had some of the same features of my normal handwriting with the right hand.  I decided that skill would not advance my ultimate career as a WordPress administrator, so I let it lapse.

    Prior to 1956, it had been thought that all of the laws of physics were invariant under a change of parity (or chiral transformation, or mirror reflexion).  But experiment showed this to be incorrect: the weak interaction, such as beta decay, violates parity and hence the universe (at least for matter, as opposed to antimatter, and time flowing forward) has a preferred handedness.

    In the macro-world, the distinction between left and right is more obvious than in quantum mechanics.  Left invariably ends up with prison camps, starvation, and mountains of skulls, while right leads to prosperity, freedom, immortality, and the stars.

    Choose wisely.

    More evil has been done by right handed people since they have sinister brains.

    How long did you mirror write? Was it hard to learn?

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  3. Remember, only left handed people are in their right mind.

    10 percent of the population is left-handed, only about 1 percent are truly able to alternate between both hands. As for sock puppets, who have no hands, it’s still a mystery how he posts things on here. He must be typing with his nose.

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  4. G.D.:
    Remember, only left handed people are in their right mind.

    10 percent of the population is left-handed, only about 1 percent are truly able to alternate between both hands. As for sock puppets, who have no hands, it’s still a mystery how he posts things on here. He must be typing with his nose.

    So 90% of the evil is cause by righties. Facts don’t lie.

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  5. 10 Cents:
    how many of you are even-handed?

    In all humility I must admit to remarkable even-handedness in my distribution of justice and mercy throughout my realm, thank you.

    10 Cents:
    How strong is your weak side?

    Weak side?

    All right, in school they exhorted us to learn to do rectal exams on cattle using our off-arms.  They claimed that this would free our writing hands for the taking of notes.  Forget that!  The client does that, and while we are talking together while working together.

    They claimed that, were we to be injured, we would have an easier comeback while gaining proficiency with our inborn first-choice arms.  Forget that!  I was darn well not going to be injured; always the client has been right there with me next to the cow, keeping everything steady.

    They claimed it would be worth the effort.  Forget that much effort!  I was way too lazy to subscribe to their program.

    So, like Einstein, I stick with the left hand and do not look back.

    Still, a person has to be prepared to improvise when the usual avenues of action are compromised: use anything that comes to hand, whether the off-hand, or even, say, a saddle, or something:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ebmfnob7ItY

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  6. My father was ambidextrous and so is my daughter and granddaughter. I had polio at three and it took until about until 12 to get complete use of my left arm and leg.  I still favor my right arm but not noticeably. I really worked on using my left for basketball but never had great confidence going left, thus a PHCHEESE and not NBA.

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  7. PhCheese:
    My father was ambidextrous and so is my daughter and granddaughter. I had polio at three and it took until about until 12 to get complete use of my left arm and leg.  I still favor my right arm but not noticeably. I really worked on using my left for basketball but never had great confidence going left, thus a PHCHEESE and not NBA.

    I have never been around an ambidextrous person. What is different about them?

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  8. I am really strong to the right side.  I see better and have greater dexterity (both hand and foot).

    I would have to work hard and patiently for many hours in order to write anything with my left hand.

    I am a pretty good touch typist, though, so I was able to train my left hand for that.

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  9. 10 Cents:

    G.D.:
    Remember, only left handed people are in their right mind.

    10 percent of the population is left-handed, only about 1 percent are truly able to alternate between both hands. As for sock puppets, who have no hands, it’s still a mystery how he posts things on here. He must be typing with his nose.

    So 90% of the evil is cause by righties. Facts don’t lie.

    So how does “your evilness”, oops I forgot you gave up that moniker, (what is it this week, Hummm was it your majesty? no that was last month, oh whatever), happen to be within the 90% since you as a refugee from a clothes drier lint trap, without any hands, arms or legs continue to be the “Sauron” of Ratburger without equal?

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  10. John Walker:

    G.D.:
    He must be typing with his nose.

    Do socks have noses?  Just askin’—don’t mean to be nosey.

    I was being polite, being a “sock” he could be using his little toe. Or something else that some people use socks for…

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  11. Back to seriousness, as to your question, 10 Cents, I doubt I could write with my left hand, while I consider it rather dexterous, necessary in lots of handyman stuff, writing is not something I could do. But it is a rather interesting question and challenge you made for yourself, writing with your left hand. But may I question the use of the word “strong” in your OP? As far as strength goes, I believe both my left and right hand are equally strong. (Again I refer to dexterity and strength as required in many applications of a tinkerer and handyman. ) As to arm strength, my left lags by very little.

    Please clarify your use of “strength” in your OP.

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  12. I once was able to write reasonably though it wasn’t pretty. I have always been able to shoot left handed almost as well as right handed. Indeed, in cowboy matches I routinely shot my Winchester 1897 shotgun left handed because I could see the ejection port more easily to toss the next cartridge in.

    Fighter planes have a stick for attitude control, as opposed to a yoke in transport type aircraft. It was noted in WWII that when jumped by an unseen enemy the pilots tended to break to the left because it was easier to push the stick leftward than to pull it rightward. In the average gunfight, most gunmen hold their weapons in their right hands. Thus, when you first engage an opponent, moving sharply to your left will give you an advantage because most shooters have a harder time moving their weapons (in their right hands) to their right – for the same reason as the pilots above. Not a huge thing, but it might save your life.

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  13. G.D.:
    Back to seriousness, as to your question, 10 Cents, I doubt I could write with my left hand, while I consider it rather dexterous, necessary in lots of handyman stuff, writing is not something I could do. But it is a rather interesting question and challenge you made for yourself, writing with your left hand. But may I question the use of the word “strong” in your OP? As far as strength goes, I believe both my left and right hand are equally strong. (Again I refer to dexterity and strength as required in many applications of a tinkerer and handyman. ) As to arm strength, my left lags by very little.

    Please clarify your use of “strength” in your OP.

    I used strong in both senses of the word dexterity and muscle. It is rare that the non-dexterous side is weak excepting for disease.

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  14. Devereaux:
    I once was able to write reasonably though it wasn’t pretty. I have always been able to shoot left handed almost as well as right handed. Indeed, in cowboy matches I routinely shot my Winchester 1897 shotgun left handed because I could see the ejection port more easily to toss the next cartridge in.

    Fighter planes have a stick for attitude control, as opposed to a yoke in transport type aircraft. It was noted in WWII that when jumped by an unseen enemy the pilots tended to break to the left because it was easier to push the stick leftward than to pull it rightward. In the average gunfight, most gunmen hold their weapons in their right hands. Thus, when you first engage an opponent, moving sharply to your left will give you an advantage because most shooters have a harder time moving their weapons (in their right hands) to their right – for the same reason as the pilots above. Not a huge thing, but it might save your life.

    Good points.
    I think most people with a little practice can bring their “weak” side up to reasonable dexterity. (I might be wrong.)

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  15. 10 Cents:

    G.D.:
    Back to seriousness, as to your question, 10 Cents, I doubt I could write with my left hand, while I consider it rather dexterous, necessary in lots of handyman stuff, writing is not something I could do. But it is a rather interesting question and challenge you made for yourself, writing with your left hand. But may I question the use of the word “strong” in your OP? As far as strength goes, I believe both my left and right hand are equally strong. (Again I refer to dexterity and strength as required in many applications of a tinkerer and handyman. ) As to arm strength, my left lags by very little.

    Please clarify your use of “strength” in your OP.

    I used strong in both senses of the word dexterity and muscle. It is rare that the non-dexterous side is weak excepting for disease.

    Seriously I dunno about that. Ask around, have someone attempt to lift something with their non preferred arm. If you go to the gym, see how much weight or better yet, repetitions you can do arm curls with on each arm. I firmly believe that the non preferred side will be “weaker”.  Unless, that was noticed and exercises were performed to remedy that situation.

    https://www.menshealth.com/trending-news/a19522428/my-dominant-arm-is-stronger-than-my-other/

    https://www.aworkoutroutine.com/muscle-imbalances/

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  16. G.D.:
    Ask around, have someone attempt to lift something with their non preferred arm. If you go to the gym, see how much weight or better yet, repetitions you can do arm curls with on each arm. I firmly believe that the non preferred side will be “weaker”.

    This makes perfect sense.  Muscles are built due to use—something that’s not used will atrophy.  If you prefer one hand, then it and that arm will get used more and consequently be stronger.

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  17. My husband was born left-handed but when he started school that was considered ill-advised (how gauche!); and so he learned handwriting with his right hand. He has very pleasant, readable writing, and for sports he favors his left arm.

    I’m right-handed and on rare occasions when I have an injury or whatever on that hand, and try to brush my teeth with the other, I practically poke holes in my cheeks for the clumsiness of my left hand.

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  18. Devereaux:
    Thus, when you first engage an opponent, moving sharply to your left will give you an advantage because most shooters have a harder time moving their weapons (in their right hands) to their right – for the same reason as the pilots above. Not a huge thing, but it might save your life.

    That’s really interesting.  Perhaps for similar reasons, there are, apparently, a high proportion of left-handed people among the top fencing champions worldwide.  Their disproportionate success is often attributed to a lifetime of fencing against both left- and right-handed opponents, while the right-handers fence against the minority left-handers only a minority of the time.

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  19. jzdro:

    Devereaux:
    Thus, when you first engage an opponent, moving sharply to your left will give you an advantage because most shooters have a harder time moving their weapons (in their right hands) to their right – for the same reason as the pilots above. Not a huge thing, but it might save your life.

    That’s really interesting.  Perhaps for similar reasons, there are, apparently, a high proportion of left-handed people among the top fencing champions worldwide.  Their disproportionate success is often attributed to a lifetime of fencing against both left- and right-handed opponents, while the right-handers fence against the minority left-handers only a minority of the time.

    In baseball a left handed batter has an advantage to get to first base.

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  20. 10 Cents:

    jzdro:

    Devereaux:
    Thus, when you first engage an opponent, moving sharply to your left will give you an advantage because most shooters have a harder time moving their weapons (in their right hands) to their right – for the same reason as the pilots above. Not a huge thing, but it might save your life.

    That’s really interesting.  Perhaps for similar reasons, there are, apparently, a high proportion of left-handed people among the top fencing champions worldwide.  Their disproportionate success is often attributed to a lifetime of fencing against both left- and right-handed opponents, while the right-handers fence against the minority left-handers only a minority of the time.

    In baseball a left handed batter has an advantage to get to first base.

    In my case I am strong right dominant, but the sight in my left eye is so bad that learned to bat leftie.   I once thought of picking up golf, and made a big improvement by acquiring some left-handed clubs.  (I was making good progress on golf but gave it up for lack of time.)

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  21. jzdro:

    Devereaux:
    Thus, when you first engage an opponent, moving sharply to your left will give you an advantage because most shooters have a harder time moving their weapons (in their right hands) to their right – for the same reason as the pilots above. Not a huge thing, but it might save your life.

    That’s really interesting.  Perhaps for similar reasons, there are, apparently, a high proportion of left-handed people among the top fencing champions worldwide.  Their disproportionate success is often attributed to a lifetime of fencing against both left- and right-handed opponents, while the right-handers fence against the minority left-handers only a minority of the time.

    Generally speaking extension is weaker than flexion. So right-to-right fencers will have both their flexion sides in sync, as well as extension. Left-to-right fencing mismatches flexion vs extension. The lefty will win more often as he mirrors his opponents moves. rather than opposes. Righties could use the same tactics but are unaccustomed to seeing them.

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