Sirajuddin Haqqani

Team Trump is negotiating with the Taliban. Y’all may consider me to be a hawk, but I do not object to negotiations, and I do not have a reason to oppose a draw-down of American troops in Afghanistan. A majority of the recently-active Ratburghers have told me that they favor a complete withdrawal, and I am on record as opposing that rash proposal. There is no need to review that here, but I cannot control where y’all want to go in the comments.

Rather, this particular post is aimed at the New York Times. They published an op-ed from a terrorist. He may be a representative of the Taliban, but in this instance he is a fugitive terrorist on the FBI’s international wanted list for killing Americans.

I refuse to give NYT any clicks, so I will not be linking directly. I read several accounts of the op-ed. Here are portions excerpted from the article at Military Times:

We did not choose our war with the foreign coalition led by the United States. We were forced to defend ourselves,” Sirajuddin Haqqani, who the FBI has labeled a designated global terrorist, wrote in an op-ed for the New York Times Thursday. “The withdrawal of foreign forces has been our first and foremost demand.” …

Haqqani also vowed the Taliban would guarantee that a new Afghanistan would foster stability and safety. …

There was a lot of push-back against the NYT for this op-ed. All the different articles put their own spin. This is from lower in the article at Military Times:

It is sad that the (New York Times) has given their platform to an individual who is on a designated terrorist list. He and his network are behind ruthless attacks against Afghans and foreigners,” a palace spokesman Sediq Sediqqi said, according to Reuters.

I was immediately struck by the fact that the New York Times did not run an accompanying “fact check” on the Taliban. You know they would never print anything from Team Trump without sliming it ten ways to Sunday.

I was also immediately struck by the chutzpah of the Taliban, right from the opening.

We did not choose our war with the foreign coalition led by the United States. We were forced to defend ourselves….

Let’s review who chose that war. After the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, it was shortly determined that the attack had been carried out by Saudi nationals (15 Saudis, two from the Emirates, one Egyptian, and one Lebanese) who were affiliated with and sponsored by Al Qaeda. The leader of the plot had been an associate of Osama bin Laden, leader of Al Qaeda, who at the time was taking credit for the attack and threatening further attacks. Bin Laden was living at a terrorist training camp in Afghanistan. At least four of the 9/11 terrorists had spent time at Al Qaeda training in Afghanistan.

President W told the Taliban to evict bin Laden and Al Qaeda from Afghanistan. The Taliban refused, with their usual scoffing and mocking. President W bombed the five Al Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan. The Taliban began to help Al Qaeda rebuild the camps. President W bombed the camps again.

Foreign journalists were stopped at a Taliban roadside checkpoint and murdered, as was an Afghan Christian.

The Taliban refused a renewed ultimatum from President W. They pledged to rebuild those terror training camps and build additional terrorist training camps. They issued an international call to interested jihadiis from all Muslim lands to come to Afghanistan to join the international jihad. They promised to export death and terror “to America, to the West and to the Jews.”

By that time President W had very publicly assembled a coalition of allies to forcibly evict the Taliban regime from Afghanistan. There were daily accounts in international news media for over five weeks during the buildup to war (which began seven weeks after the 9/11 attack).

So, who chose war?

9+
avataravataravataravataravataravataravataravataravatar

7 thoughts on “Sirajuddin Haqqani”

  1. I think this is as simple, on one level, as we can see from the opening sentence.  USA, IT’S YOUR FAULT!
    Think the NYT is gonna pass up an opportunity to publish that sentiment, from any quarter?

    MJB. thanks for your  review of the facts.

    5+
    avataravataravataravataravatar
  2. June 7th, 1944

    Following the Allied landings in Normandy yesterday, the New York Times presents this view from German Reichsführer SS Heinrich Himmler, denouncing this “invasion by a foreign coalition of our European heimat”.  He said, “we will defend our homeland”.  Roosevelt administration officials contacted by the Times declined to comment.

    7+
    avataravataravataravataravataravataravatar
  3. The new series Homeland has Haqqani in it part of a peace negotiation. Was this a precognition on part of the scriptwriter?

    “There’s a world-weariness to the start of this season of Homeland befitting the final run of a show about the current state of the tired world. As Saul Berenson and Carrie Mathison try to broker a seemingly impossible peace in the Middle East, they both bring up how long they’ve been involved in this complex dance. The marker of “18 years” (since 9/11) comes up more than once, and there’s just something in the body language of Claire Danes and Mandy Patinkin that reflects the repetitive nature of what they’re attempting, almost a hope that if you bang your head against the wall long enough then maybe it will break. It’s a nice tone to use for the final season, although it could get a little wearying for viewers if it holds too long.

    “Catch and Release” is really about two parallel missions by Carrie and Saul. Carrie has to find a way to convince Abdul Qadir G’ulom (Mohammad Bakri) to walk back his comments on the prisoners of war set to be released by the Afghan government to pull them closer to peace with the Taliban. And Saul receives intel from Max that the in-hiding Taliban leader Haissam Haqqani (Numan Acar) is honestly interested in peace. Max needed that surveillance equipment to work so they could be sure that the peace efforts by Haqqani were legitimate, and it appears they are. Sadly, Saul’s excitement over a long-delayed peace forces him to make a crucially wrong decision that could destroy it for another generation.

    First, Carrie has to get past the fact that she saw Yevgeny coming out of G’ulom’s office. Why would an Afghan leader be talking to Yevgeny? Are the Russians and Afghans working together again? Almost more disturbing is the final scene of the episode in which Yevgeny implies Carrie knows why he’s there. Well, at least she knew once, but she can’t even remember the majority of her time in captivity. Is it possible she didn’t just give intel in her manic state but set plans in motion of which she is now a part?”

    https://www.vulture.com/2020/02/homeland-recap-season-8-episode-2-catch-and-release.html

    3+
    avataravataravatar
  4. John Walker:
    June 7th, 1944

    Following the Allied landings in Normandy yesterday, the New York Times presents this view from German Reichsführer SS Heinrich Himmler, denouncing this “invasion by a foreign coalition of our European heimat”.  He said, “we will defend our homeland”.  Roosevelt administration officials contacted by the Times declined to comment.

    My view of the New York Times is at this very level of treason.

    3+
    avataravataravatar

Leave a Reply