TOTD 2020-2-22: Watches

(Fun off topic point, today’s date can be written in all 2s in the Japanese dating system.)

This topic was suggested by Dev. Generally it will be about watches. I was wondering what your first watches were. I can’t remember the brand but mine was a wind up watch that lost time. I would forget to wind it and broke it. I think I got it wet but I might have left it in a pocket and the washing machine killed it.

I think my first watch I bought for myself was a red led watch. They were only on the market for a short time before the more efficient LEDs took their place.

What was your first watch?
Which watch(es) did you buy for yourself?
Do you wear a watch now?

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61 thoughts on “TOTD 2020-2-22: Watches”

  1. My FIRST watch was given to me by a family friend when I was 8 or 9, to be worn when I “grew up”. My mother decided to wear it instead and I never got it back.

    My first watch that I actually wore was in high school. It was an Omega. I liked it a lot, but for some strange reason I took to wearing it on my right arm, and I’ve worn one on the “wrong” hand ever since. I packed it away in my duffle bag when I got to Nam. When my stuff got to me in the hospital, the watch had been stolen.

    In Nam I wore a Seiko electric. I didn’t have to worry about winding or what have you. Not a pretty watch but it did what it was suppose to. After I got married, my wife bought me a Tag Heuer watch, which I still have and wear from time to time. I wore it constantly until about 2000, when I bought a Tag Heuer chrono. I mostly wear that nowadays.

    I have my father’s watch, an International from Schaufhausen (?sp). He wore that every day. It’s a wind-up, gold, with a leather strap. My dress watch my parents gave me as my graduation gift from college. It is a Patek Philip, so obviously it’s a wind-up. It looks so thin although it isn’t really. Lovely watch.

    I am looking at a Breitling. I would consider trading in my Tag chrono or that. It is a beautiful watch, with a nifty leather but snap strap, a great face, all kinds of info on it, and still a classic looking watch. It is automatic, which I’ve never owned, but it would save me on batteries.

    We gave our son an expensive automatic Tag chrono for his graduation. I think the piece is lovely, but I’m not sure he wears it much these days. He has a couple automatics, and one of his Christmas gifts a number of years ago was a box in which you put your automatics and it kept them wound by moving them. Auto’s should not be run down nor left so for a long time.

    Everyone thinks I’m a lefty because I wear my watch on my right hand. It is just an anomoly; I cannot remember why I started doing that, but as I said, it was back in high school and it has stuck. I have tried to go to the left hand but I only last about 2-3 hours and have to move it back. Such is the power of habit.

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  2. I never could get into Rolex’s. There is something ostentatious about them. They are too thick, too big, too everything. To me they are a kind of “Look at me, now!” kind of watch and I prefer understated elegance. Subtle. Like the Patek. Unless you know about watches, you might only think it’s kind of a neat looking watch.

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  3. I think the brand I have bought the most from is Casio. They are inexpensive and come with timers and alarms. I don’t use alarms on watches but I love a timer. Recently the watch I wear is a sports watch that tracks my steps and heart beat. (Yes, DocLor and Gerry, I have a heart.) I am afraid that when it comes to timepieces my cell phone is what I go to a lot. My sports watch is smart and lets me know when a notification is happening on my phone. It is not an iWatch because those are too expensive and have had bad battery life. I have to charge mine every 7-10 days.

    I have an analog with a dead battery that is the closest thing to a watch with style. Maybe this post will get me to finally change that battery.

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  4. 10 Cents:
    Why did your mother wear your watch, Dev? Was it small like a lady’s watch?

    It was a rather elegant old watch. I think she just liked it. It wasn’t a “woman’s watch”. I mostly don’t like those. I got my wife a Tag womans watch – worst watch we ever had. It was CONSTANTLY in the shop for this or that. She wears a Tissot now.

    I have found (actually my wife did) a shop that will change your watch batteries for life free after paying the initial price. It’s about $50. Seeing as the watch repairman is now charging something like $70 to change a battery and test the watch to be waterproof (part of what you are suppose to do for dive watches), it’s a steal. AND they also test for waterproofing.

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  5. Drat! My post was “lost”. (I use “Drat” so as not to get bleeped.)

    My first watch was a Roy Rogers watch. I got it around 8 years old. Maybe because I would always be late for supper?

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  6. Devereaux:

    10 Cents:
    Why did your mother wear your watch, Dev? Was it small like a lady’s watch?

    It was a rather elegant old watch. I think she just liked it. It wasn’t a “woman’s watch”. I mostly don’t like those. I got my wife a Tag womans watch – worst watch we ever had. It was CONSTANTLY in the shop for this or that. She wears a Tissot now.

    I have found (actually my wife did) a shop that will change your watch batteries for life free after paying the initial price. It’s about $50. Seeing as the watch repairman is now charging something like $70 to change a battery and test the watch to be waterproof (part of what you are suppose to do for dive watches), it’s a steal. AND they also test for waterproofing.

    It is about $10 to change a battery here.

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  7. Devereaux:
    $70 to change a battery

    Scary!

    Amazon has watch-repair kits that always include a special vise for holding the watch upside-down.  After squinting at a few youtube videos, I settled on an approach to removing the back of the case.  It involves a letter-opener in one hand and a heavy leather glove on the other!

    After replacing the battery and gawking in wonder at the insides of the watch, I replace the back with an inexpensive “watch press set.”

    How do they test for waterproofing when the ratings are for various depths that won’t fit on a workbench?  I’m missing something obvious here.

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  8. jzdro:

    Devereaux:
    $70 to change a battery

    Scary!

    Amazon has watch-repair kits that always include a special vise for holding the watch upside-down.  After squinting at a few youtube videos, I settled on an approach to removing the back of the case.  It involves a letter-opener in one hand and a heavy leather glove on the other!

    After replacing the battery and gawking in wonder at the insides of the watch, I replace the back with an inexpensive “watch press set.”

    How do they test for waterproofing when the ratings are for various depths that won’t fit on a workbench?  I’m missing something obvious here.

    I have at least three (3) Timex watches, I’ll never learn, that when I took them in to get the batteries replaced, even with expensive, (more expensive looking than that, but same principal), watch press sets, the back would never get on or stay on.

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  9. I was given a watch in high school but never liked wearing it and gave up wearing it.

    In the early 1980s I had an outside job for a couple of years, so I bought a cheap wristwatch.  Mostly I carried it in my pocket.   When I was able to get an inside job I quit wearing a watch.   I use my computer to remind me of appointments, most of which I arrive at early.

    Snooks gets Older Son to change her watch battery.   He is really good at tasks like that.   He had worked for a couple of years as a locksmith, and acquired some useful fine motor skills.

    Older son recently bought himself a watch.  It was one he stumbled upon at Reddit.  There was a post about these cool high-quality Soviet watches with 24-hour clock faces.  He bought one from the late 1960s.   It is a striking watch.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/Watches/comments/5frroq/raketa_anyone_have_experience_with_the_brand/

    I don’t know the vintage of the Raketa in the picture; I grabbed this off the internet at Etsy, since Older Son won’t visit here until tomorrow.

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  10. jzdro:

    Devereaux:
    $70 to change a battery

    Scary!

    Amazon has watch-repair kits that always include a special vise for holding the watch upside-down.  After squinting at a few youtube videos, I settled on an approach to removing the back of the case.  It involves a letter-opener in one hand and a heavy leather glove on the other!

    After replacing the battery and gawking in wonder at the insides of the watch, I replace the back with an inexpensive “watch press set.”

    How do they test for waterproofing when the ratings are for various depths that won’t fit on a workbench?  I’m missing something obvious here.

    They put it in a special container that has water and can be put under pressure. They leave it in for some period of time, then look for water in the case. If there is water, the seal is bad and must be replaced.

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  11. MJBubba:
    I was given a watch in high school but never liked wearing it and gave up wearing it.

    In the early 1980s I had an outside job for a couple of years, so I bought a cheap wristwatch.  Mostly I carried it in my pocket.   When I was able to get an inside job I quit wearing a watch.   I use my computer to remind me of appointments, most of which I arrive at early.

    Snooks gets Older Son to change her watch battery.   He is really good at tasks like that.   He had worked for a couple of years as a locksmith, and acquired some useful fine motor skills.

    Older son recently bought himself a watch.  It was one he stumbled upon at Reddit.  There was a post about these cool high-quality Soviet watches with 24-hour clock faces.  He bought one from the late 1960s.   It is a striking watch.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/Watches/comments/5frroq/raketa_anyone_have_experience_with_the_brand/

    I don’t know the vintage of the Raketa in the picture; I grabbed this off the internet at Etsy, since Older Son won’t visit here until tomorrow.

    That looks like a military watch. They and airline people, seem to be the only ones who use a 24-hr clock to avoid confusion.

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  12. My parents bought me a Wittnauer watch when I was a kid. It was cool because it was square instead of round but I was afraid to wear it much for fear of losing or breaking it. I also had a Timex (takes a licking, keeps on ticking) for everyday use. The Wittnauer doesn’t work to well but the Timex is just fine. It lives in a junk drawer with several other watches I’ve used over the years. I abandoned wearing a watch about ten years ago except for special occasions when I use a Pulsar my wife gave me sometime in the aughts.

    The Timex is strictly mechanical; you wind it every couple of days. It is user-serviceable: you can oil it. When the EMP hits, I’ll be the only one who knows what time it is.

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  13. MJBubba:
    Older son recently bought himself a watch.  It was one he stumbled upon at Reddit.  There was a post about these cool high-quality Soviet watches with 24-hour clock faces.  He bought one from the late 1960s.   It is a striking watch.

    That is one cool watch.

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  14. drlorentz:
    My parents bought me a Wittnauer watch when I was a kid. It was cool because it was square instead of round but I was afraid to wear it much for fear of losing or breaking it. I also had a Timex (takes a licking, keeps on ticking) for everyday use. The Wittnauer doesn’t work to well but the Timex is just fine. It lives in a junk drawer with several other watches I’ve used over the years. I abandoned wearing a watch about ten years ago except for special occasions when I use a Pulsar my wife gave me sometime in the aughts.

    The Timex is strictly mechanical; you wind it every couple of days. It is user-serviceable: you can oil it. When the EMP hits, I’ll be the only one who knows what time it is.

    When the EMP hits remember the little hand is for the hours and the big hand is for the minutes.

    Could we do a test with your Timex? I was thinking of strapping you wearing the Timex and see if it passes the licking. I am betting on the Timex just so you know.

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  15. drlorentz:

    MJBubba:
    Older son recently bought himself a watch.  It was one he stumbled upon at Reddit.  There was a post about these cool high-quality Soviet watches with 24-hour clock faces.  He bought one from the late 1960s.   It is a striking watch.

    That is one cool watch.

    Commie!

    On a regular watch the time between numerals for the minute hand is five minutes where this the interval is 2.5 minutes. Interesting. I wonder why the 24 hour watches/clocks never caught on.

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  16. I’ve had a few watches, here and there.  I, too, wore my watch on my right hand – despite being right-handed – for a long time.

    I can’t remember my first watch but it was early in my life (maybe age 7 or 8).  After it, I had a few Mickey Mouse watches and loved them.  My favorite iteration went through the wash and was never the same.  I also had a series of Swatches in the 80s (oh-so-80s). Then, I quit wearing a watch altogether until about 8 years ago.  We were in Switzerland and I saw the Swiss Railway clocks and knew that was a good time piece: simple, uncluttered, easy to read.  My current office clock and my wristwatch, are therefore Mondaines.  I opted to buy the men’s version because its larger size makes it easy for me to  look at it discreetly and be able to see it easily while at work.

    I also have my father-in-law’s old Spiro Agnew watch.

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  17. Susan in Seattle:
    I’ve had a few watches, here and there.  I, too, wore my watch on my right hand – despite being right-handed – for a long time.

    I can’t remember my first watch but it was early in my life (maybe age 7 or 8).  After it, I had a few Mickey Mouse watches and loved them.  My favorite iteration went through the wash and was never the same.  I also had a series of Swatches in the 80s (oh-so-80s). Then, I quit wearing a watch altogether until about 8 years ago.  We were in Switzerland and I saw the Swiss Railway clocks and knew that was a good time piece: simple, uncluttered, easy to read.  My current office clock and my wristwatch, are therefore Mondaines.  I opted to buy the men’s version because its larger size makes it easy for me to  look at it discreetly and be able to see it easily while at work.

    I also have my father-in-law’s old Spiro Agnew watch.

    “Spiro of ‘76” was going to be a great slogan. Your father-in-law must have been a staunch Republican.

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  18. Susan in Seattle:
    My current office clock and my wristwatch, are therefore Mondaines.  I opted to buy the men’s version because its larger size makes it easy for me to  look at it discreetly and be able to see it easily while at work.

    I like the clean design. You’ve identified an excellent reason for continuing to use a watch instead of relying on one’s phone: being able to sneak a peek. I get bored at meetings and certain social gatherings.

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  19. drlorentz:

    Susan in Seattle:
    My current office clock and my wristwatch, are therefore Mondaines.  I opted to buy the men’s version because its larger size makes it easy for me to  look at it discreetly and be able to see it easily while at work.

    I like the clean design. You’ve identified an excellent reason for continuing to use a watch instead of relying on one’s phone: being able to sneak a peek. I get bored at meetings and certain social gatherings.

    Don’t do it during a presidential debate, Doc.

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  20. Susan in Seattle:

    10 Cents:

    Susan in Seattle:

    I also have my father-in-law’s old Spiro Agnew watch.

    “Spiro of ‘76” was going to be a great slogan. Your father-in-law must have been a staunch Republican.

    Ahhh, hahahahahaha!

    I think only Spiro Agnew had a watch. Can you think of another politician?

    https://www.justcollecting.com/miscellania/spiro-agnew-watch

    Agnew was a vocal critic of anti-war protestors and liberal demonstrators throughout the Vietnam War, and was seen as a joke by many Democrats. His public persona became a caricature, and a popular joke asked the question “Did you know that Mickey Mouse wore a Spiro Agnew watch?”

    The Californian Democrat Dr. Hale E. Dougherty decided to design and market the watches as another joke, but was amazed when they became popular across the United States. Agnew soon became annoyed by the watch which portrayed him as a ‘cartoon character’ and attempted to sue Dougherty, although the case was eventually settled out of court.

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  21. 10 Cents:

    drlorentz:

    Susan in Seattle:
    My current office clock and my wristwatch, are therefore Mondaines.  I opted to buy the men’s version because its larger size makes it easy for me to  look at it discreetly and be able to see it easily while at work.

    I like the clean design. You’ve identified an excellent reason for continuing to use a watch instead of relying on one’s phone: being able to sneak a peek. I get bored at meetings and certain social gatherings.

    Don’t do it during a presidential debate, Doc.

    If the president personally invites me, I promise not to be bored.

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