TOTD 2020-2-26: Graphene Batteries

I saw this in my YouTube feed.

How important are graphene batteries?  Will they replace the Li-ion batteries in phones? What other types of batteries show promise?

I was thinking how much of my life is connected to these portable energy sources. At one time about the only thing batteries were used for in my life was the a flashlight or portable radio. How about you and your former uses?

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14 thoughts on “TOTD 2020-2-26: Graphene Batteries”

  1. There is a tremendous amount of hype surrounding graphene, this company Real Graphene, and so-called “graphene batteries”.  Note that they carefully (most of the time) refer to them as “graphene enhanced batteries”.  What the “enhanced” means is that it’s a lithium ion battery with graphene terminals on the cells replacing the metal currently used.  The battery chemistry is bog-standard lithium ion.  Real Graphene CEO Samuel Gong gives the game away in two quotes in this article:

    Graphene is an amazing conductor of heat and electricity. Lithium doesn’t like it when you put a lot of energy in and when you take a lot of energy out. We’ve applied graphene in two different ways. We mix it in the solution with lithium, plus we’ve add [sic] a composite layer, like a sheet of it, in the lithium battery. It acts as a conductor for the electricity, and doesn’t generate as much heat.

    and:

    Adding a graphene sheet doesn’t affect the attributes of a cell. It’s only one-to-five atomic layers thick, and this doesn’t affect the physical properties at all. It’s an easy plug-and-play, because the cells can be the same shape and size. You get the immediate benefits of graphene.

    There may be improvements on the margin due to the electrical and thermal properties of the graphene, but the performance of the battery remains those imposed by the electrochemical processes of a lithium ion cell.

    This has the general odour of “high-definition” gold-plated digital audio and video cables sold at outrageous prices to the uninformed and unwary.

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  2. John Walker:
    Note that they carefully (most of the time) refer to them as “graphene enhanced batteries”

    I noticed that as well as the Nobel Peace Prize error. The video has a late-night-TV infomercial odor about it. If anyone is interested, I’d be happy to sell you some Ginsu knives. How much would you pay for a knife like that? Before you answer…

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  3. drlorentz:

    John Walker:
    Note that they carefully (most of the time) refer to them as “graphene enhanced batteries”

    I noticed that as well as the Nobel Peace Prize error. The video has a late-night-TV infomercial odor about it. If anyone is interested, I’d be happy to sell you some Ginsu knives. How much would you pay for a knife like that? Before you answer…

    I had no idea when I first saw this commercial it had nothing to do with Japan. “Ginsu” means nothing. They did sell a lot of them.

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  4. drlorentz:

    John Walker:
    Note that they carefully (most of the time) refer to them as “graphene enhanced batteries”

    I noticed that as well as the Nobel Peace Prize error. The video has a late-night-TV infomercial odor about it. If anyone is interested, I’d be happy to sell you some Ginsu knives. How much would you pay for a knife like that? Before you answer…

    For the last near decade, whenever a certain person starts off a sentence: “In Japan…” I think of that commercial.

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  5. 10 Cents:
    Open at your own risk.

    Interesting. I hadn’t heard about Ginsu involvement in this incident. Amusingly, my phone autocompletes ginsu as Ginsburg. Coincidence? I don’t think so.

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  6. John Walker:
    There is a tremendous amount of hype surrounding graphene, this company Real Graphene, and so-called “graphene batteries”.

    They have zero apparent patent footprint (18-month lag before anything becomes public and they only were founded in the US last year – see below – they possibly have a greater presence in China) and their one trademark application was self-filed (rather than using an attorney). 

    RetrievePDF

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