Ted Boutros Chinafluffer Gets it Right

Beijing Bob pulls off an entirely factual and sensible statement, which I found over on worldometer as the most recent update:


“We understand that countries are trying to assess when and how they will be able to ease these measures.

The answer depends on what countries do while these population-wide measures are in place.

Asking people to stay at home and shutting down population movement is buying time and reducing the pressure on health systems, but on their own, these measures will not extinguish the epidemics.

The point of these actions is to enable the more precise and targeted measures that are needed to stop transmission and save lives. We call on all countries that have introduced so-called “lockdown” measures to use this time to attack the virus. You have created a second window of opportunity. The question is: how will you use it? There are 6 key actions that we recommend:

1. expand, train, and deploy your health care and public health workforce

2. implement a system to find every suspected case at the community level

3. ramp up production capacity and availability of testing

4. identify, adapt, and equipt facilities you will use to treat patients

5. develop a clear plan and process to quarantine contacts

6. refocus the whole of government on suppressing and controlling COVID-19

These measures are the best way to suppress and stop transmission so that when restrictions are lifted, the virus doesn’t resurge.

The last thing any country needs is to reopen schools and businesses only to be forced to close them again because of a resurgence

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO, March 25, 2020 [video]

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8 thoughts on “Ted Boutros Chinafluffer Gets it Right”

  1. I’m not sure that focusing “all of government” on the virus is the right mix. Government is inherently inefficient. Central planning is poor. There needs to be more response by local industry. I am pleased to hear that GM and Ford (I think) have committed to making ventilators. But their timelines seem a bit long. We created, built, tested, and started large-scale production of the P-51 Mustang fighter in something like 6 weeks. ?Where did that spirit and ability go.

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  2. Devereaux:
    I’m not sure that focusing “all of government” on the virus is the right mix. Government is inherently inefficient. Central planning is poor. There needs to be more response by local industry. I am pleased to hear that GM and Ford (I think) have committed to making ventilators. But their timelines seem a bit long. We created, built, tested, and started large-scale production of the P-51 Mustang fighter in something like 6 weeks. ?Where did that spirit and ability go.

    That spirit and ability was buried under mountains of bureaucracy and regulation. It has to be dug up and dusted off by archeologists with jackhammers.

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  3. Devereaux:
    We created, built, tested, and started large-scale production of the P-51 Mustang fighter in something like 6 weeks. ?Where did that spirit and ability go.

    I  had a fantasy the other day.  I was thinking about my colleagues that need to get new equipment built and running to make the N95 masks.

    I was envisioning the welders welding frames, electricians wiring devices, dock workers unloading parts and rushing them to the shop, and engineers figuring out how to do the whole project faster.  The corporate bureaucracy getting out of the way and letting people focus on the objective.  Nobody saying let’s meet on this next week and decide.  Nobody saying I will fab that up tomorrow.  Long hard days but the thrill of showing what can be done if you just turn people loose.  The true joy that comes when you are allowed to give it your all.

    Then my heart sank as I thought about the large interconnected network of what it takes to build equipment and make products.  Would other Americans be doing the same thing to get the connectors, the sensors, the motors, the drives, the steel, the fasteners … or would the parts necessary be coming from China?  For lack of a nail … Hopefully, we can strip down other equipment for any needed parts.

    I also doubt we can stop with the top down management approach.  For example, I wonder if anyone is jumping on an airplane or renting a private plane on their own authority because something needs to happen right now.

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  4. Letting the states execute is the way America is supposed to work. The ones who can will do well, the ones who cannot will be long remembered.  Governors who FUBAR a natural disaster are not often returned to office. Presidents are if the media covers for them.

    Get the friggin federal government out of the way, their sole focus should be border control and regulation killing in a time like this.

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  5. civil westman:

    Devereaux:
    I’m not sure that focusing “all of government” on the virus is the right mix. Government is inherently inefficient. Central planning is poor. There needs to be more response by local industry. I am pleased to hear that GM and Ford (I think) have committed to making ventilators. But their timelines seem a bit long. We created, built, tested, and started large-scale production of the P-51 Mustang fighter in something like 6 weeks. ?Where did that spirit and ability go.

    That spirit and ability was buried under mountains of bureaucracy and regulation. It has to be dug up and dusted off by archeologists with jackhammers.

    One of the good news items that Dr. Birx had today was an item from some association of anesthesiologists, in which she relayed that they said that most anesthesiologists have access to equipment that can be hacked to serve as ventilators in a pinch, and that this could go a long way towards resolving any ventilator shortage until all those new ventilators arrive.

    Are they talking about your idea of making a poor man’s ventilator by hacking an oxygen concentrator into a CPAP ?   That sounded like a good strategy to me.

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  6. MJBubba:

    civil westman:

    Devereaux:
    I’m not sure that focusing “all of government” on the virus is the right mix. Government is inherently inefficient. Central planning is poor. There needs to be more response by local industry. I am pleased to hear that GM and Ford (I think) have committed to making ventilators. But their timelines seem a bit long. We created, built, tested, and started large-scale production of the P-51 Mustang fighter in something like 6 weeks. ?Where did that spirit and ability go.

    That spirit and ability was buried under mountains of bureaucracy and regulation. It has to be dug up and dusted off by archeologists with jackhammers.

    One of the good news items that Dr. Birx had today was an item from some association of anesthesiologists, in which she relayed that they said that most anesthesiologists have access to equipment that can be hacked to serve as ventilators in a pinch, and that this could go a long way towards resolving any ventilator shortage until all those new ventilators arrive.

    Are they talking about your idea of making a poor man’s ventilator by hacking an oxygen concentrator into a CPAP ?   That sounded like a good strategy to me.

    Anesthesia machines are all equipped with ventilators. For every one used, an OR must go offline, however. In addition, they are not nearly as sophisticated as ICU ventilators – they give only regular timed breaths and take no account of the patient’s breathing cycle. This can be VERY unpleasant. Real ventilators operate on a principle called S-IMV (synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation), which times all breaths to the patient’s respiratory cycle.

    I haven’t heard of anyone suggesting my hack. It won’t be sufficient for the worst cases, but, I think could help at the margins. BTW, I just received the last item on my wish list: albuterol for nebulization. It was on backorder for about a month. All set up now, down to an extra-heavy-duty extension cord so I can plug my two concentrators into two different electrical circuits in different rooms. Not taking any chances of tripping breakers in a dire emergency. Maybe I really am paranoid.

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